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 Henry James Feltus

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Henry James Feltus

Birth
New York, New York County (Manhattan), New York, USA
Death
12 Jan 1926 (aged 79)
Bloomington, Monroe County, Indiana, USA
Burial
Bloomington, Monroe County, Indiana, USA
Plot
Mausoleum
Memorial ID
34490917 View Source

The Bloomington Weekly Star 1/15/1926--
HENRY J. FELTUS SIGNS '30' AFTER 53 ACTIVE YEARS
Notable Career of Star Editor is Ended
Final tribute was paid Thursday morning to the last early remains of Henry J. Feltus, veteran soldier and editor, and publisher of The Bloomington Star.
Draped in the Stars and Stripes, the casket bearing his body, was sealed in the Rose Hill mausoleum, beside the body of his devoted wife of fifty years, who died four years ago this month.
Death came to The Star's leader at 3:30, Tuesday afternoon, as he lay in his study at his residence on East Second Street--in the same room where for nearly four years he had worked at his labors as a newspaper writer. He was conscious until the afternoon he passed peacefully away. At the noon hour, although weakened by protracted illness, he chatted with his youngest son, Paul. Interest in his newspaper was relentless until the end. He died "in the harness", as he always had hoped to do. He was 80 years of age last August, and served as a newspaper man for more than 53 years.
Funeral services were held at ten o'clock Thursday morning at the Trinity Episcopal church of which he was a member, and last rites were pronounced at both the church and tomb by the Rev. A. Elliston Cole, rector. The active pallbearers were Charles Barnhill, George Henley, John H. Huntington, Wood Wiles, W. B. Smith and W. P. Dill. Honorary pallbearers were, John W. Cravens, Oscar Cravens, Walter Bradfute, Robert W. Miers, Joseph H. Campbell, Major Silas Grimes, Sanford Teter and Howard Tourner.
Henry J. Feltus was married on Feb. 13, 1872 to Catherine Ella Baird at St. Stephens Episcopal church in Terre Haute. Five children were born to them, all of whom survive, Mrs. Gertrude Romiser, Harry J. Feltus, Roy Feltus, John Feltus and Paul Feltus. All the children are residents of Bloomington at this time, with the exception of John Feltus, who is in business in Lexington, Ky.
Born August 15, 1846 in New York City, H. J. Feltus was the son of Lambert Moore Feltus and Eliza Greenwood Colton Feltus. His mother died when he was a child, but many happy years were spent with the father and a stepmother. Early days in New York City were vividly recalled by Mr. Feltus.
The romance of Henry J. Feltus' migration to the west was an interesting one. With his brother, Charles L. Feltus, he was to join his father in Cincinnati. The two boys were tagged and shipped by express addressed to their father, and arrived safely.
Practically all of Mr. Feltus' active career was a a soldier and newspaper man, for soon after his arrival west he enlisted in the Union army where he served until discharged when he started newspaper work.
His military career was an interesting one. Enlisting Jan. 4, 1864 in Troop C, 13th Indiana Cavalry, he was promoted to Corporal, then to Sergeant and to Regimental Sergeant-Major. Later, he was commissioned Adjutant of the Thirteenth Cavalry, and he and Major Silas Grimes of Bloomington were the only two living civil war officers in Monroe county up to the time of his death.
Henry J. Feltus fought in nearly all the great battles of the civil war. Among them were the battles of Nashville, Franklin, Huntsville, Decatur, Murfreesboro, Fot Gaines, Fot Blakely, Fort Spanish and the taking of the Mobile Coast Defenses. He also was on the famous Geirson's Raid through the south in 1865. He was wounded following the battle of Nashville by Rebel snipers, and always carried a scar from the bullet in his side. His discharge certificate was dated Nov. 18, 1865, with his age given as 21.
Early newspaper experience of Mr. Feltus was first gained in Terre Haute, Indiana, where he served as correspondent of the Cincinnati Enquirer. Following his marriage he moved to Greencastle and there established The Greencastle Star in 1872. In 1875 he moved his family, then his wife and daughter, to Bloomington to start a Democratic newspaper. The Bloomington Courier was established by him in 1875 and was published both as a weekly and daily until 1895 when the paper was sold to John W. and Oscar Cravens. The same year the Feltus Printing company was founded as a job printing plant, and a year later Harry Feltus, a son, began the publication of The Weekly Star in the Feltus printing office. In 1920 the Feltus Printing Company was reorganized by H. J. Feltus and son, who installed a modern printing plant for the publication of The Bloomington Star and other printing work.
H. J. Feltus served as postmaster of Bloomington under the last Cleveland administration, and his commission as postmaster, still retained, is dated Aug. 13, 1886, and is signed by President Cleveland. Mr. Feltus also served as a member of the city council of Bloomington.
Mr. Feltus was a member and past Exalted Ruler of the Elks lodge of Bloomington, and a beautiful tribute was paid to him at the meeting of that order Wednesday night.
He was the last of a family of three sons who preceded him many years by death.
Mr. Feltus was a member of a prominent Knickerbocker family, and his grandfather, Henry James Feltus I, was one of the first rectors of St. Stephens church, New York City. A picture of the Rev. Feltus hangs now in the parish house of St. Stephens in Gotham.
Mr. Feltus' father also was a civil war officer, and many of his uncles and cousins served their country in the army and in military academies. H. J. Feltus' eldest son was a soldier in the Spanish-American war and youngest son a soldier in the world war I.

The Bloomington Weekly Star 1/15/1926--
HENRY J. FELTUS SIGNS '30' AFTER 53 ACTIVE YEARS
Notable Career of Star Editor is Ended
Final tribute was paid Thursday morning to the last early remains of Henry J. Feltus, veteran soldier and editor, and publisher of The Bloomington Star.
Draped in the Stars and Stripes, the casket bearing his body, was sealed in the Rose Hill mausoleum, beside the body of his devoted wife of fifty years, who died four years ago this month.
Death came to The Star's leader at 3:30, Tuesday afternoon, as he lay in his study at his residence on East Second Street--in the same room where for nearly four years he had worked at his labors as a newspaper writer. He was conscious until the afternoon he passed peacefully away. At the noon hour, although weakened by protracted illness, he chatted with his youngest son, Paul. Interest in his newspaper was relentless until the end. He died "in the harness", as he always had hoped to do. He was 80 years of age last August, and served as a newspaper man for more than 53 years.
Funeral services were held at ten o'clock Thursday morning at the Trinity Episcopal church of which he was a member, and last rites were pronounced at both the church and tomb by the Rev. A. Elliston Cole, rector. The active pallbearers were Charles Barnhill, George Henley, John H. Huntington, Wood Wiles, W. B. Smith and W. P. Dill. Honorary pallbearers were, John W. Cravens, Oscar Cravens, Walter Bradfute, Robert W. Miers, Joseph H. Campbell, Major Silas Grimes, Sanford Teter and Howard Tourner.
Henry J. Feltus was married on Feb. 13, 1872 to Catherine Ella Baird at St. Stephens Episcopal church in Terre Haute. Five children were born to them, all of whom survive, Mrs. Gertrude Romiser, Harry J. Feltus, Roy Feltus, John Feltus and Paul Feltus. All the children are residents of Bloomington at this time, with the exception of John Feltus, who is in business in Lexington, Ky.
Born August 15, 1846 in New York City, H. J. Feltus was the son of Lambert Moore Feltus and Eliza Greenwood Colton Feltus. His mother died when he was a child, but many happy years were spent with the father and a stepmother. Early days in New York City were vividly recalled by Mr. Feltus.
The romance of Henry J. Feltus' migration to the west was an interesting one. With his brother, Charles L. Feltus, he was to join his father in Cincinnati. The two boys were tagged and shipped by express addressed to their father, and arrived safely.
Practically all of Mr. Feltus' active career was a a soldier and newspaper man, for soon after his arrival west he enlisted in the Union army where he served until discharged when he started newspaper work.
His military career was an interesting one. Enlisting Jan. 4, 1864 in Troop C, 13th Indiana Cavalry, he was promoted to Corporal, then to Sergeant and to Regimental Sergeant-Major. Later, he was commissioned Adjutant of the Thirteenth Cavalry, and he and Major Silas Grimes of Bloomington were the only two living civil war officers in Monroe county up to the time of his death.
Henry J. Feltus fought in nearly all the great battles of the civil war. Among them were the battles of Nashville, Franklin, Huntsville, Decatur, Murfreesboro, Fot Gaines, Fot Blakely, Fort Spanish and the taking of the Mobile Coast Defenses. He also was on the famous Geirson's Raid through the south in 1865. He was wounded following the battle of Nashville by Rebel snipers, and always carried a scar from the bullet in his side. His discharge certificate was dated Nov. 18, 1865, with his age given as 21.
Early newspaper experience of Mr. Feltus was first gained in Terre Haute, Indiana, where he served as correspondent of the Cincinnati Enquirer. Following his marriage he moved to Greencastle and there established The Greencastle Star in 1872. In 1875 he moved his family, then his wife and daughter, to Bloomington to start a Democratic newspaper. The Bloomington Courier was established by him in 1875 and was published both as a weekly and daily until 1895 when the paper was sold to John W. and Oscar Cravens. The same year the Feltus Printing company was founded as a job printing plant, and a year later Harry Feltus, a son, began the publication of The Weekly Star in the Feltus printing office. In 1920 the Feltus Printing Company was reorganized by H. J. Feltus and son, who installed a modern printing plant for the publication of The Bloomington Star and other printing work.
H. J. Feltus served as postmaster of Bloomington under the last Cleveland administration, and his commission as postmaster, still retained, is dated Aug. 13, 1886, and is signed by President Cleveland. Mr. Feltus also served as a member of the city council of Bloomington.
Mr. Feltus was a member and past Exalted Ruler of the Elks lodge of Bloomington, and a beautiful tribute was paid to him at the meeting of that order Wednesday night.
He was the last of a family of three sons who preceded him many years by death.
Mr. Feltus was a member of a prominent Knickerbocker family, and his grandfather, Henry James Feltus I, was one of the first rectors of St. Stephens church, New York City. A picture of the Rev. Feltus hangs now in the parish house of St. Stephens in Gotham.
Mr. Feltus' father also was a civil war officer, and many of his uncles and cousins served their country in the army and in military academies. H. J. Feltus' eldest son was a soldier in the Spanish-American war and youngest son a soldier in the world war I.


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  • Maintained by: G Kirkley
  • Originally Created by: GLS
  • Added: 5 Mar 2009
  • Find a Grave Memorial ID: 34490917
  • Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/34490917/henry-james-feltus: accessed ), memorial page for Henry James Feltus (15 Aug 1846–12 Jan 1926), Find a Grave Memorial ID 34490917, citing Rose Hill Cemetery, Bloomington, Monroe County, Indiana, USA; Maintained by G Kirkley (contributor 49170853).