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LT Connally T. Lyon

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LT Connally T. Lyon

Birth
Death
17 Sep 1862
Sharpsburg, Washington County, Maryland, USA
Burial
Shepherdstown, Jefferson County, West Virginia, USA
Memorial ID
34083560 View Source

Article in The Abingdon Virginian, Abingdon, Virginia, Friday, 5 December 1862 reads...
OBITUARY
LIEUT. CONNALLY T. LYON

It is with feelings of the deepest regret, that I announce the death of Connally T. Lyon, son of Harrison and Margaret Lyon, of Scott County, Virginia and Lieut. of Co. A, 48th Reft. Va. Cols. Lieut. Lyon entered the service as a private in Capt. Vermillion's Company in July, 1861, when he was not 16 years of age, where he remained until he was killed instantly by a shot through the body, in the battle of Antietam, near Sharpsburg, Maryland, on the 17th September, 1862, whilst gallantly commanding his company. He fell in a foreign land, but his friends as a testimonial of the esteem in which they held him, removed his body within the limits of his native State, where it was decently buried. Belonging to General Loring's command, he suffered the hardships and privations of the Valley Mountain Campaign during the summer and fall of 1861. In December of that year, Gen. Loring joined Gen. Jackson at Winchester. After that, his Regiment became permanently attached to Gen. Jackson's Division, and was with it in the winter campaign to Bath and Romney. At the re-organization in April, 1862, young Lyon was elected third Lt. of his company. From that date, down to. his death, he was in all the movements of General Jackson's Division of the army. His kind and gentle manner made him friends wherever he was known, and his cheerfulness and fidelity in the discharge of his duties, won for him the respect and confidence of officers and men. Modest and retiring in the social circle, when the time for action came, this boy-officer was ever found at his post. At the battle of Cedar Run, he commanded his company, and so signally did he distinguish himself, that Gen. Jackson in passing, halted in admiration, to inquire who that "young officer" was. He gave his young life to the cause of his country, in one of the fiercest battles of the war, and as he lived beloved, so died lamented by his Regiment C.

Article in The Abingdon Virginian, Abingdon, Virginia, Friday, 5 December 1862 reads...
OBITUARY
LIEUT. CONNALLY T. LYON

It is with feelings of the deepest regret, that I announce the death of Connally T. Lyon, son of Harrison and Margaret Lyon, of Scott County, Virginia and Lieut. of Co. A, 48th Reft. Va. Cols. Lieut. Lyon entered the service as a private in Capt. Vermillion's Company in July, 1861, when he was not 16 years of age, where he remained until he was killed instantly by a shot through the body, in the battle of Antietam, near Sharpsburg, Maryland, on the 17th September, 1862, whilst gallantly commanding his company. He fell in a foreign land, but his friends as a testimonial of the esteem in which they held him, removed his body within the limits of his native State, where it was decently buried. Belonging to General Loring's command, he suffered the hardships and privations of the Valley Mountain Campaign during the summer and fall of 1861. In December of that year, Gen. Loring joined Gen. Jackson at Winchester. After that, his Regiment became permanently attached to Gen. Jackson's Division, and was with it in the winter campaign to Bath and Romney. At the re-organization in April, 1862, young Lyon was elected third Lt. of his company. From that date, down to. his death, he was in all the movements of General Jackson's Division of the army. His kind and gentle manner made him friends wherever he was known, and his cheerfulness and fidelity in the discharge of his duties, won for him the respect and confidence of officers and men. Modest and retiring in the social circle, when the time for action came, this boy-officer was ever found at his post. At the battle of Cedar Run, he commanded his company, and so signally did he distinguish himself, that Gen. Jackson in passing, halted in admiration, to inquire who that "young officer" was. He gave his young life to the cause of his country, in one of the fiercest battles of the war, and as he lived beloved, so died lamented by his Regiment C.


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Co. A, 18th Va

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