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Albert Hamilton Smith

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Albert Hamilton Smith

Birth
Tennessee, USA
Death
13 May 1947 (aged 81)
Maben, Oktibbeha County, Mississippi, USA
Burial
Webster County, Mississippi, USA Add to Map
Memorial ID
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A. H. Smith Passes After Nearly Sixty Years' Service --- Brother Smith was born February 6, 1866 in Tennessee. He moved to Lafayette County, Miss., near Oxford, when he was just a small boy. He moved a little farther south to Dancy about 1900. He began preaching the gospel when he was about twenty-one, and continued until his health failed about four years ago. He was always kind and humble in his preaching, yet stood firm on what he believed to be the truth of the Bible, never compromising with what he believed to be error. He preached in Alabama, Arkansas, and Texas, but most of his preaching was done in the state of Mississippi. It seems that he looked upon the neglected state and determined to break the bread of life to those who would be passed by otherwise. Many were his sacrifices for the cause he held as sacred and his faithful family shared in this. He felt keenly the responsibility for the small weak congregations; hence, made many trips to preach the truth at his own expense. The Lord gave him many souls to reward his labor. Even though he may not have been as widely known as some, those who knew him "esteemed him very highly in love for his works' sake." I had not known him personally until less than three years ago, when we moved to Columbus, Miss.; but I had known his reputation for good about twenty years, and, hence, I felt that I knew him the first time I met him. My father-in-law, J. E. Blain, who passed on in 1935. has told me many times how Brother Smith, Harris, and Jeffcoat taught him and Mrs. Blain the truth about thirty years ago. After being confined to his bed at Maben, Miss., about four years, he closed his eyes in death May 12 [tombstone has May 13], 1947, at the age of eighty-one. On May 14 his family and friends went with him back to the church and cemetery at Dancy where he had gone with many others and laid him to rest. Surely God has something better in store for him. Singing was arranged by friends and I made the talk. May God's richest blessings abide with his loved ones who mourn his departure. --- C. W. Brannon, Gospel Advocate, July 10, 1947, 499.

From the history of Beech Hill church of Christ, Benton Co., MS: "Often times preachers would be preaching for other congregations in the area and would preach at Beech Hill on Sunday afternoon, Thursday night or any time a service could be arranged not to conflict. These visiting preachers often came by horseback, wagon and some by train to Ripley where they were met by one of the members in a wagon. One such preacher was A. H. Smith from Dancy, Mississippi. He was a big, quiet, white haired man with a very gentle spirit. Homer Graves remembered riding with his father, Louis Graves, to meet the train and bring Brother Smith to their house to stay the week and preach two sermons daily. In 1996 when Homer and Hugh Graves were discussing this, Hugh recalled a sermon that Smith preached about the seven candlesticks."
A. H. Smith Passes After Nearly Sixty Years' Service --- Brother Smith was born February 6, 1866 in Tennessee. He moved to Lafayette County, Miss., near Oxford, when he was just a small boy. He moved a little farther south to Dancy about 1900. He began preaching the gospel when he was about twenty-one, and continued until his health failed about four years ago. He was always kind and humble in his preaching, yet stood firm on what he believed to be the truth of the Bible, never compromising with what he believed to be error. He preached in Alabama, Arkansas, and Texas, but most of his preaching was done in the state of Mississippi. It seems that he looked upon the neglected state and determined to break the bread of life to those who would be passed by otherwise. Many were his sacrifices for the cause he held as sacred and his faithful family shared in this. He felt keenly the responsibility for the small weak congregations; hence, made many trips to preach the truth at his own expense. The Lord gave him many souls to reward his labor. Even though he may not have been as widely known as some, those who knew him "esteemed him very highly in love for his works' sake." I had not known him personally until less than three years ago, when we moved to Columbus, Miss.; but I had known his reputation for good about twenty years, and, hence, I felt that I knew him the first time I met him. My father-in-law, J. E. Blain, who passed on in 1935. has told me many times how Brother Smith, Harris, and Jeffcoat taught him and Mrs. Blain the truth about thirty years ago. After being confined to his bed at Maben, Miss., about four years, he closed his eyes in death May 12 [tombstone has May 13], 1947, at the age of eighty-one. On May 14 his family and friends went with him back to the church and cemetery at Dancy where he had gone with many others and laid him to rest. Surely God has something better in store for him. Singing was arranged by friends and I made the talk. May God's richest blessings abide with his loved ones who mourn his departure. --- C. W. Brannon, Gospel Advocate, July 10, 1947, 499.

From the history of Beech Hill church of Christ, Benton Co., MS: "Often times preachers would be preaching for other congregations in the area and would preach at Beech Hill on Sunday afternoon, Thursday night or any time a service could be arranged not to conflict. These visiting preachers often came by horseback, wagon and some by train to Ripley where they were met by one of the members in a wagon. One such preacher was A. H. Smith from Dancy, Mississippi. He was a big, quiet, white haired man with a very gentle spirit. Homer Graves remembered riding with his father, Louis Graves, to meet the train and bring Brother Smith to their house to stay the week and preach two sermons daily. In 1996 when Homer and Hugh Graves were discussing this, Hugh recalled a sermon that Smith preached about the seven candlesticks."


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