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Richard Edward “Dick” Whitsitt

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Richard Edward “Dick” Whitsitt

Birth
Hamilton County, Ohio, USA
Death
17 Mar 1881 (aged 50)
Colorado, USA
Burial
Denver, City and County of Denver, Colorado, USA Add to Map
Memorial ID
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Colorado Adjutant General 1861-1862

An original member of the Denver Town Company in 1858


The Riverside Cemetery Association was officially incorporated on April 1, 1876 with a capital stock of $2,000 divided into twenty shares. Richard Witsitt was among the original twenty stockholders.

WHITSITT, Richard Ed., a merchant handling gold dust, a stockholder of Denver City, and member of the first Constitutional Convention in 1859, was born 1830, died 1881, and is buried at Riverside Cemetery, Denver. He arrived at goldfields with the Leavenworth Company, Nov 16, 1858. They came via Pueblo District. The two Larimers, M. M. Jewett, and Folsom Dorsett accompanied the party also. He was Recorder of the County for a long time, was 1st Adj. Gen. of Colorado, member of the Wartime Territorial Council, Auditor of Colorado 1864-66. He was one of the founders of the Episcopal Church, Denver, Feb 11, 1860; operated a good deal in real estate, both in Kansas and Colorado. His wife is said to be Miss Miles, daughter of a pioneer who had a claim near Golden. He had a niece, Miss Emma M. Gerrish, who married Frank S. Marshall, in Los Angeles, California 1880. Having no children, it is said, the Whitsitts adopted about 1865 a Navajo Indian boy and reared him. William P. McClure once challenged Whitsitt, and a duel was fought in Oct 1859, on ground about a mile above Auraria and Denver, near Cherry Creek. Morton C. Fisher was Whitsitt's Second. McClure was hit by his adversary's ball and wounded, but the injury was healed in about a month later. A crowd of about 200 citizens witnessed the duel, which the Sheriff was unable to stop. It made a good deal of comment and speculation as to the cause for many years afterward, both of the parties being so prominent. Portraits of Whitsitt are in Hall's Colorado History, Vol. 1, p. 216, and in Smiley's History of Denver, p. 215.

Fiftyniners' Directory
Colorado Argonauts
1858-1859
Pikes Peak Region
Compiled by Henrietta E. Bromwell
Denver, Colorado 1926





Richard Ed. Whitsitt
Information Compiled by LaDonna Gunn

Traveling to the Pike's Peak region in November 1858, Richard (Dick) Ed. Whitsitt participated in the organization of several mining towns in the region. Whitsitt and his friend, General William Larimer, came to the area from Kansas, following the South Platte River trail.

From the outset, Whitsitt and Larimer intended on promoting and speculating town sites rather than prospecting for gold mines. As a result not only did Whitsitt participate in the organizing of Denver City in 1858, but also Whitsitt was a director of the Colorado City Town Company, founding the town on August 12, 1859.

Although Whitsitt lived in Denver, Whitsitt remained active in Colorado City. Whitsitt belonged to the El Paso Claim Club, a vigilante form of early civil government that recorded real estate claims and settled land disputes, lasting from 1859 to 1862. Whitsitt also advertised his services as a Denver real estate and collection agent in The Colorado City Journal in November 1861.

His name is among those listed on the Colorado soldier monument in front of the Colorado State Capital.
Colorado Adjutant General 1861-1862

An original member of the Denver Town Company in 1858


The Riverside Cemetery Association was officially incorporated on April 1, 1876 with a capital stock of $2,000 divided into twenty shares. Richard Witsitt was among the original twenty stockholders.

WHITSITT, Richard Ed., a merchant handling gold dust, a stockholder of Denver City, and member of the first Constitutional Convention in 1859, was born 1830, died 1881, and is buried at Riverside Cemetery, Denver. He arrived at goldfields with the Leavenworth Company, Nov 16, 1858. They came via Pueblo District. The two Larimers, M. M. Jewett, and Folsom Dorsett accompanied the party also. He was Recorder of the County for a long time, was 1st Adj. Gen. of Colorado, member of the Wartime Territorial Council, Auditor of Colorado 1864-66. He was one of the founders of the Episcopal Church, Denver, Feb 11, 1860; operated a good deal in real estate, both in Kansas and Colorado. His wife is said to be Miss Miles, daughter of a pioneer who had a claim near Golden. He had a niece, Miss Emma M. Gerrish, who married Frank S. Marshall, in Los Angeles, California 1880. Having no children, it is said, the Whitsitts adopted about 1865 a Navajo Indian boy and reared him. William P. McClure once challenged Whitsitt, and a duel was fought in Oct 1859, on ground about a mile above Auraria and Denver, near Cherry Creek. Morton C. Fisher was Whitsitt's Second. McClure was hit by his adversary's ball and wounded, but the injury was healed in about a month later. A crowd of about 200 citizens witnessed the duel, which the Sheriff was unable to stop. It made a good deal of comment and speculation as to the cause for many years afterward, both of the parties being so prominent. Portraits of Whitsitt are in Hall's Colorado History, Vol. 1, p. 216, and in Smiley's History of Denver, p. 215.

Fiftyniners' Directory
Colorado Argonauts
1858-1859
Pikes Peak Region
Compiled by Henrietta E. Bromwell
Denver, Colorado 1926





Richard Ed. Whitsitt
Information Compiled by LaDonna Gunn

Traveling to the Pike's Peak region in November 1858, Richard (Dick) Ed. Whitsitt participated in the organization of several mining towns in the region. Whitsitt and his friend, General William Larimer, came to the area from Kansas, following the South Platte River trail.

From the outset, Whitsitt and Larimer intended on promoting and speculating town sites rather than prospecting for gold mines. As a result not only did Whitsitt participate in the organizing of Denver City in 1858, but also Whitsitt was a director of the Colorado City Town Company, founding the town on August 12, 1859.

Although Whitsitt lived in Denver, Whitsitt remained active in Colorado City. Whitsitt belonged to the El Paso Claim Club, a vigilante form of early civil government that recorded real estate claims and settled land disputes, lasting from 1859 to 1862. Whitsitt also advertised his services as a Denver real estate and collection agent in The Colorado City Journal in November 1861.

His name is among those listed on the Colorado soldier monument in front of the Colorado State Capital.

Inscription

Richard Edward Witsitt "one of the founders of Denver."



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