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Maj Isaac Compton Elston

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Maj Isaac Compton Elston

Birth
Death
24 Oct 1867 (aged 73)
Burial
Crawfordsville, Montgomery County, Indiana, USA
Memorial ID
33002590 View Source

ELSTON FAMILY RELOCATED
Crawfordsville Weekly Review, April 21, 1883
The remains of Major ELSTON and wife, son and daughter, were this week removed by the relatives from the family burial ground in Elston Grove to the beautiful family lot at Oak Hill.

Crawfordsville Journal Obituary (October 31, 1867): "Died on the morning of the 24th of October, 1867, at his residence in this city, after an illness of but a few hours, Major Isaac C. Elston, Sen., at the age of seventy-three years. Major Elston was born at Elizabethtown, New Jersey, on the 8th of October, 1794. At the age of six years, he removed with his father to Syracuse, in western New York, where he continued to reside during his minority. Upon arriving at the years of manhood, moved by that enterprising spirit which has marked his whole life, he made his way westward, and for a few years lived at Vincennse, then one of the outposts of civilization. Some three years later, he moved to what is now known as Terre Haute, the country in that vicinity then being little less than a wilderness, relieved only by the occasional cabin of the new emigrant. Here he is engaged in the mercantile business, perhaps the earliest enterprise of the kind attempted at that place. In the fall of the year 1824, he settled with his family in Crawfordsville, where but half a dozen log cabins indicated that a village had begun. Here he again engaged in the mercantile business, and the early pioneers who were his contemporaries will remember the force and energy which he brought to hear in the prosecution of his business, and his kind and generous department toward friends and acquaintances in those early days of our history. Some forty eight years since he connected himself with the Masonic fraternity, of which he was an active member aiding in carrying out the benevolent purpose of the Order. About the year 1827, he united with the Methodist Episcopal Church, under the ministry of that eminent and devoted servant of God, the late Rev. James Armstrong. His connection with the Church continued to the day of his decease, and his brethren will bear witness to the interest and zeal he ever manifested in the support of the ministry, and whatever related to the well being of the church of his choice. He was actively engaged in business pursuits in this place for some forty four years and although he was careful in looking after his pecuniary interests, yet none will be able to call to mind a single instance where he has shown himself exacting or oppressive. His fellow citizens owe much of their natural prosperity to the force and energy with which he has sustained the public enterprises of the day, few of which have succeeded without having been in some measure, indebted to his aid and encouragement, and now will have forgotten that to his active and untiring efforts, we are mainly indebted for the establishment of the first railroad communication with this place, an era from which dates its present propriety. Those who have had the pleasure of his acquaintance, and enjoyed his friendship through these years will remember his kind and genial, his generous attachment to his friends, his courteous affable, deportment to all and will realize that a kind hearted man, and valued citizen has passed from our midst. But they who most keenly feel this inflictive Providence are those of his own household. The lose and affectionate husband and father, the most loved and trusted of earthly friends. Yet there remains to them the comforting assurance that he has passed to a better inheritance."

ELSTON FAMILY RELOCATED
Crawfordsville Weekly Review, April 21, 1883
The remains of Major ELSTON and wife, son and daughter, were this week removed by the relatives from the family burial ground in Elston Grove to the beautiful family lot at Oak Hill.

Crawfordsville Journal Obituary (October 31, 1867): "Died on the morning of the 24th of October, 1867, at his residence in this city, after an illness of but a few hours, Major Isaac C. Elston, Sen., at the age of seventy-three years. Major Elston was born at Elizabethtown, New Jersey, on the 8th of October, 1794. At the age of six years, he removed with his father to Syracuse, in western New York, where he continued to reside during his minority. Upon arriving at the years of manhood, moved by that enterprising spirit which has marked his whole life, he made his way westward, and for a few years lived at Vincennse, then one of the outposts of civilization. Some three years later, he moved to what is now known as Terre Haute, the country in that vicinity then being little less than a wilderness, relieved only by the occasional cabin of the new emigrant. Here he is engaged in the mercantile business, perhaps the earliest enterprise of the kind attempted at that place. In the fall of the year 1824, he settled with his family in Crawfordsville, where but half a dozen log cabins indicated that a village had begun. Here he again engaged in the mercantile business, and the early pioneers who were his contemporaries will remember the force and energy which he brought to hear in the prosecution of his business, and his kind and generous department toward friends and acquaintances in those early days of our history. Some forty eight years since he connected himself with the Masonic fraternity, of which he was an active member aiding in carrying out the benevolent purpose of the Order. About the year 1827, he united with the Methodist Episcopal Church, under the ministry of that eminent and devoted servant of God, the late Rev. James Armstrong. His connection with the Church continued to the day of his decease, and his brethren will bear witness to the interest and zeal he ever manifested in the support of the ministry, and whatever related to the well being of the church of his choice. He was actively engaged in business pursuits in this place for some forty four years and although he was careful in looking after his pecuniary interests, yet none will be able to call to mind a single instance where he has shown himself exacting or oppressive. His fellow citizens owe much of their natural prosperity to the force and energy with which he has sustained the public enterprises of the day, few of which have succeeded without having been in some measure, indebted to his aid and encouragement, and now will have forgotten that to his active and untiring efforts, we are mainly indebted for the establishment of the first railroad communication with this place, an era from which dates its present propriety. Those who have had the pleasure of his acquaintance, and enjoyed his friendship through these years will remember his kind and genial, his generous attachment to his friends, his courteous affable, deportment to all and will realize that a kind hearted man, and valued citizen has passed from our midst. But they who most keenly feel this inflictive Providence are those of his own household. The lose and affectionate husband and father, the most loved and trusted of earthly friends. Yet there remains to them the comforting assurance that he has passed to a better inheritance."

Gravesite Details

Born in Elizabeth, New Jersey


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