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Roland K. Manley

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Roland K. Manley Veteran

Birth
Missouri, USA
Death
13 Jul 1943 (aged 19)
Sicilia, Italy
Burial
Springfield, Greene County, Missouri, USA Add to Map
Plot
30, 2376-A
Memorial ID
View Source
Cpl. Roland Manley Killed in Action In North Africa
Cpl. Roland K. Manley, 18, a paratrooper, was killed in action July 13 in the North African area, his mother, Mrs. Helen Manley, of 640 South New, had been notified by the War department today. Relatives here believed Corporal Manley was killed in the invasion of Sicily which began July 10. Mrs. Manley was in North Carolina, where the corporal's twin brother, Ralph K. Manley, is in training as a paratrooper, when the telegram announcing her son's death was received here. The news was sent to her by her brother, Rex P. Kreider, of route 8. Corporal Manley enlisted two years ago, and finished his studies at Senior High school after beginning his training. Besides his mother, brother and uncle, he is survived by his father, Jack Manley, who is believed to be in Kansas, his grandmother, Mrs. John Kreider, of route 8; and a sister, Dorothy F. Manley, a WAC stationed at Fort Des Moines. (Springfield Leader-Press, Springfield, MO, Friday, August 27, 1943)


Schoolmate Pays Tribute To
Heroic Roland Manley
To The Editor
I wasn't surprised when I heard that Roland Manley had joined the paratroopers. Somehow it was the branch of service made for a boy like him. He was the adventurous type, one of the most truly daring boys I knew. He faced life without the least bit of reserve or hesitation, and he met war with the same eagerness of spirit. I wouldn't say he was brave, but he was courageous. He saw his duty and took his place quickly. He was a friend from grade school days and I feel that I knew him well enough to tell you a little about him. He had red hair. The kind that has to have freckles to complete the scene. He had the kind of blue eyes that sometimes you would be tempted to call green, but the important thing about them was their sparkle and the way they seemed to flicker from friendliness and good humor to mischief and back again. He had a carelessness that was becoming, a way that put a stranger at ease, and made him feel that they had known him always. He was happy-go-lucky, enjoyed life, and liked people immensely. He talked in a hurry and words tumbled over each other as if he didn't have time to say all he wanted to-maybe he didn't. Roland was a twin, and to a new acquaintance he and Ralph were very confusing. It was great fun for the class the way the teacher would get them mixed at the first of every year. Instead of saying anything, they would sit there with funny smiles until the teacher would realize she had made a mistake again. She usually resorted to placing one on one side of the class room and the one on the other until she had names and boys straightened out, and things back to normal. Roland was the clown. He loved to laugh and also to create laughter. That he did very successfully. One day as I stepped into the aisle to go to lunch. I was surprised to feel a breath-taking jerk around my middle, and I sat as quickly as I had hopped up. At the desk behind me sat Roland laughing merrily. He had tied the sash of my dress around the back of the seat. I gave him a terrible glare, but when I looked at his delighted face, I felt the corners of my mouth begin to tug, and before I knew it, I was laughing too. He had that infectious kind of laughter. He was never malicious with is tricks and he played them in such a friendly way that they just didn't provoke anger. As Roland grew older he retained his little boy eagerness, and his need to be in the middle of things. One evening at the neighborhood drug store, a little group of us were discussing this and that over our soft drinks and the war was mentioned. Roland didn't have a lot to say. He looked a little pale and the ready smile faded from his face. Just like a lot of other American boys, he couldn't quite put into words what went on inside, but somehow you knew it was there. Freedom meant a lot to Roland. He never said so. He didn't tell in alot of high sounding words how much he loved America, and what it meant to American young people to be allowed to make their own choices. No, he couldn't tell us but he showed us. We hear the statement that doesn't make sense: "Roland Manley Killed in Action in Sicily." No! It can't be. Not Roland Manley. He was so alive and so into things. We turn it in our minds like millions of other friends and relatives have turned those same words over in their minds. Just the name is different. Maybe the place. Our vision blurs, something squeezes our heart, and we can't breathe. They've made a mistake. That's it. But, no. It is no mistake. America has lost a soldier, Springfield has lost a red-headed boy, and a mother has lost her son. He is gone we say. Then the merry face appears before us and, we know that he will never be lost to us, for he had the kind of youthful spirit that age couldn't have conquered, and neither will death. He will live on because some of his happy disposition has seeped into the hearts of those who knew him. He is typical of American boys who are dying for the American principles and for us. We will not forget, Roland. We will be all the more determined that we avenge your loss and the loss of others like you. This time it must not be in vain. You understand, don't you, Roland. You chums won't let you down. -Dorothy Melville Mongold, 1433 South Fremont, City. Editors note: Corporal Manley was the son of Mrs. Helen Manley of 640 South New and he was reported killed in action in the North African area on July 13. He would have been 20 years old this October. He enlisted in the Army in February of 1942 and received his wings as a paratrooper in June of that year. His identical twin brother, Ralph, received his wings as a paratrooper in July of this year. Roland Manley began his schooling at McGregor [Elementary] and went on to Jarrett [Junior high] and then to Senior high school. Although he enlisted before he had completed high school courses, he continued his studies by mail and received his diploma as a member of the class of '42. He was a member of St. Paul's church.
(Sunday News & Leader, Sunday, Springfield, MO, September 5, 1943, p. B7, Col. 5-6).


T/5 ROLAND K. MANLEY
The body of T/5 Roland K. Manley, 19, who was killed July 13, 1943, in the invasion of Sicily, will arrive in Springfield Saturday afternoon for funeral services and reburial under direction of Herman Lohmeyer. Accompanying the body here from Kansas City will be his twin brother, Ralph, of Springfield. Both boys served as paratroopers during the war but chose different outfits in the hope that the chances of one of them emerging unscathed would be greater. Roland was in the 82nd Airborne division. Ralph in the 101st Airborne division. Roland Manley lived here all of his life before entering the service in February, 1941. Even so, he received his diploma from Senior High School with the class of '41. He was a member of St. Paul Methodist church. Besides the brother, he is survived by his mother, Mrs. Helen Manley, formerly of Springfield and now of Tucson, Ariz.; his father, O. D. Manley of Mount Vernon, Wash.; a sister, Mrs. Charles Turner of Springfield, and his maternal grandmother, Mrs. John Kreider of route 8. (Springfield Leader-Press, Springfield, MO, Wednesday, November 17, 1948, p. 23, Col. 7)


T/5 ROLAND K. MANLEY
Funeral services for T/5 Roland K. Manley, 19, who was killed July 13, 1943, in the invasion of Sicily, will be at 3 o'clock Sunday afternoon in Herman Lohmeyer chapel with Rev. Robert Baker officiating. Burial will be in National Cemetery, with the American Legion conducting services at the grave. His mother, Mrs. Helen Manley, lives in Tucson, Ariz., and his father, O. D. Manley, lives in Mount Vernon, Wash. Pallbearers will be Arthur Collins, Bill Bartlett, Joe Burnette, William S. Rhodes, Glen Dillon, and Eugene Russell. (Springfield Leader-Press, Springfield, MO, Friday, November 19, 1948, p. 17, Col. 3)
Cpl. Roland Manley Killed in Action In North Africa
Cpl. Roland K. Manley, 18, a paratrooper, was killed in action July 13 in the North African area, his mother, Mrs. Helen Manley, of 640 South New, had been notified by the War department today. Relatives here believed Corporal Manley was killed in the invasion of Sicily which began July 10. Mrs. Manley was in North Carolina, where the corporal's twin brother, Ralph K. Manley, is in training as a paratrooper, when the telegram announcing her son's death was received here. The news was sent to her by her brother, Rex P. Kreider, of route 8. Corporal Manley enlisted two years ago, and finished his studies at Senior High school after beginning his training. Besides his mother, brother and uncle, he is survived by his father, Jack Manley, who is believed to be in Kansas, his grandmother, Mrs. John Kreider, of route 8; and a sister, Dorothy F. Manley, a WAC stationed at Fort Des Moines. (Springfield Leader-Press, Springfield, MO, Friday, August 27, 1943)


Schoolmate Pays Tribute To
Heroic Roland Manley
To The Editor
I wasn't surprised when I heard that Roland Manley had joined the paratroopers. Somehow it was the branch of service made for a boy like him. He was the adventurous type, one of the most truly daring boys I knew. He faced life without the least bit of reserve or hesitation, and he met war with the same eagerness of spirit. I wouldn't say he was brave, but he was courageous. He saw his duty and took his place quickly. He was a friend from grade school days and I feel that I knew him well enough to tell you a little about him. He had red hair. The kind that has to have freckles to complete the scene. He had the kind of blue eyes that sometimes you would be tempted to call green, but the important thing about them was their sparkle and the way they seemed to flicker from friendliness and good humor to mischief and back again. He had a carelessness that was becoming, a way that put a stranger at ease, and made him feel that they had known him always. He was happy-go-lucky, enjoyed life, and liked people immensely. He talked in a hurry and words tumbled over each other as if he didn't have time to say all he wanted to-maybe he didn't. Roland was a twin, and to a new acquaintance he and Ralph were very confusing. It was great fun for the class the way the teacher would get them mixed at the first of every year. Instead of saying anything, they would sit there with funny smiles until the teacher would realize she had made a mistake again. She usually resorted to placing one on one side of the class room and the one on the other until she had names and boys straightened out, and things back to normal. Roland was the clown. He loved to laugh and also to create laughter. That he did very successfully. One day as I stepped into the aisle to go to lunch. I was surprised to feel a breath-taking jerk around my middle, and I sat as quickly as I had hopped up. At the desk behind me sat Roland laughing merrily. He had tied the sash of my dress around the back of the seat. I gave him a terrible glare, but when I looked at his delighted face, I felt the corners of my mouth begin to tug, and before I knew it, I was laughing too. He had that infectious kind of laughter. He was never malicious with is tricks and he played them in such a friendly way that they just didn't provoke anger. As Roland grew older he retained his little boy eagerness, and his need to be in the middle of things. One evening at the neighborhood drug store, a little group of us were discussing this and that over our soft drinks and the war was mentioned. Roland didn't have a lot to say. He looked a little pale and the ready smile faded from his face. Just like a lot of other American boys, he couldn't quite put into words what went on inside, but somehow you knew it was there. Freedom meant a lot to Roland. He never said so. He didn't tell in alot of high sounding words how much he loved America, and what it meant to American young people to be allowed to make their own choices. No, he couldn't tell us but he showed us. We hear the statement that doesn't make sense: "Roland Manley Killed in Action in Sicily." No! It can't be. Not Roland Manley. He was so alive and so into things. We turn it in our minds like millions of other friends and relatives have turned those same words over in their minds. Just the name is different. Maybe the place. Our vision blurs, something squeezes our heart, and we can't breathe. They've made a mistake. That's it. But, no. It is no mistake. America has lost a soldier, Springfield has lost a red-headed boy, and a mother has lost her son. He is gone we say. Then the merry face appears before us and, we know that he will never be lost to us, for he had the kind of youthful spirit that age couldn't have conquered, and neither will death. He will live on because some of his happy disposition has seeped into the hearts of those who knew him. He is typical of American boys who are dying for the American principles and for us. We will not forget, Roland. We will be all the more determined that we avenge your loss and the loss of others like you. This time it must not be in vain. You understand, don't you, Roland. You chums won't let you down. -Dorothy Melville Mongold, 1433 South Fremont, City. Editors note: Corporal Manley was the son of Mrs. Helen Manley of 640 South New and he was reported killed in action in the North African area on July 13. He would have been 20 years old this October. He enlisted in the Army in February of 1942 and received his wings as a paratrooper in June of that year. His identical twin brother, Ralph, received his wings as a paratrooper in July of this year. Roland Manley began his schooling at McGregor [Elementary] and went on to Jarrett [Junior high] and then to Senior high school. Although he enlisted before he had completed high school courses, he continued his studies by mail and received his diploma as a member of the class of '42. He was a member of St. Paul's church.
(Sunday News & Leader, Sunday, Springfield, MO, September 5, 1943, p. B7, Col. 5-6).


T/5 ROLAND K. MANLEY
The body of T/5 Roland K. Manley, 19, who was killed July 13, 1943, in the invasion of Sicily, will arrive in Springfield Saturday afternoon for funeral services and reburial under direction of Herman Lohmeyer. Accompanying the body here from Kansas City will be his twin brother, Ralph, of Springfield. Both boys served as paratroopers during the war but chose different outfits in the hope that the chances of one of them emerging unscathed would be greater. Roland was in the 82nd Airborne division. Ralph in the 101st Airborne division. Roland Manley lived here all of his life before entering the service in February, 1941. Even so, he received his diploma from Senior High School with the class of '41. He was a member of St. Paul Methodist church. Besides the brother, he is survived by his mother, Mrs. Helen Manley, formerly of Springfield and now of Tucson, Ariz.; his father, O. D. Manley of Mount Vernon, Wash.; a sister, Mrs. Charles Turner of Springfield, and his maternal grandmother, Mrs. John Kreider of route 8. (Springfield Leader-Press, Springfield, MO, Wednesday, November 17, 1948, p. 23, Col. 7)


T/5 ROLAND K. MANLEY
Funeral services for T/5 Roland K. Manley, 19, who was killed July 13, 1943, in the invasion of Sicily, will be at 3 o'clock Sunday afternoon in Herman Lohmeyer chapel with Rev. Robert Baker officiating. Burial will be in National Cemetery, with the American Legion conducting services at the grave. His mother, Mrs. Helen Manley, lives in Tucson, Ariz., and his father, O. D. Manley, lives in Mount Vernon, Wash. Pallbearers will be Arthur Collins, Bill Bartlett, Joe Burnette, William S. Rhodes, Glen Dillon, and Eugene Russell. (Springfield Leader-Press, Springfield, MO, Friday, November 19, 1948, p. 17, Col. 3)

Inscription

ROLAND K
MANLEY
MISSOURI
TEC5 504 PRCHT INF
82 ABN DIV
WORLD WAR II
OCTOBER 15 1923
JULY 13 1943



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