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COL Sidney Madison Barnes

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COL Sidney Madison Barnes

Birth
Irvine, Estill County, Kentucky, USA
Death
19 May 1890 (aged 69)
Carthage, Jasper County, Missouri, USA
Burial
Fort Smith, Sebastian County, Arkansas, USA
Plot
Section 3, Row 1, Grave 1183
Military
COL, INFANTRY
Memorial ID
327091 View Source

DEATH OF AN EMINENT MAN

Col. S. M. Barnes Passes Away at his Home in this City.


Col. Sidney M, Barnes died at his home in this city last night at 8 o'clock. The direct cause of his death was from the bursting of a blood vessel of his stomach in a severe coughing spell. Col. Barnes has been troubled for some time past with rheumatism, and a week ago took a severe cold which brought on a persistent cough and finally resulted indirectly in his death, as above stated. He had been seriously ill only since Sunday evening.
Col. Barnes was born in Irvine, Estill county, Kentucky May 10th 1821. He entered the circuit clerk's office at an early age and prepared himself to be admitted to the bar at 21 years of age. He was married the same year he was admitted to the bar to Elizabeth Mize, of the same county. He practiced law in his native county and rose rapidly in his profession and in politics.

He was a representative in the State legislature at the age of 25 and a Senator at 30. Subsequently he practiced law till the outbreak of the war when he took a prominent part in saving Kentucky to the Union. In 1861 he was among the first to enter the field, recruiting volunteers for the Union army, and early in the war was commissioned Colonel of the 8th Kentucky Volunteer Infantry.
His regiment was a part of the Army of the Cumberland, and was in some of the hardest fought battles of the war, among which were Chickamauga, Lookout Mountain and Murphysboro. His regiment planted the colors on the top of Lookout Mountain when the enemy was routed at Chattanooga.

After returning from the army he practiced his profession till 1868, when he made an energetic canvass of the state as candidate on the Republican ticket for Governor of Kentucky.
A few years later he removed to Little Rock, Arkansas and soon became a leading member of that state. In 1874 he was elected to the constitutional convention that framed the present organic law of Arkansas, and took a prominent part in the work as leader of the judiciary committee of that body.

In 1879 President Hays tendered him the appointment of U. S. Attorney for New Mexico, which he accepted, removing to the territory and practicing law in the territorial and federal courts till 1883, when he removed his family to this place for the purpose of educating his grandchildren, Sidney and Jennie Redding.

Two years ago he was compelled to give up his law practice on account of his rheumatic trouble, and then joined his family here, where he has resided ever since.
Of his immediate family he leaves a wife and Sidney and Jennie Redding. He has two sons, Thos. H. and James K. of Ft. Smith, and Mrs. John Watts and Mrs. Judge Campbell of Wichita.

The funeral occurred at the Methodist Episcopal church in this city this afternoon, and the remains will be taken on this evening's train to Ft. Smith for burial. The G.A.R. turned out in full force for his funeral.
Col. Barnes was not a member of the G.A.R., but only last Friday he told Dr. Galbreath that he wished to join the post here, that he was getting old and could not expect to live long, but he did not wish to die outside of the G.A.R.

Article published in the Carthage Weekly Press
May 22, 1890 in Carthage, Missouri.

DEATH OF AN EMINENT MAN

Col. S. M. Barnes Passes Away at his Home in this City.


Col. Sidney M, Barnes died at his home in this city last night at 8 o'clock. The direct cause of his death was from the bursting of a blood vessel of his stomach in a severe coughing spell. Col. Barnes has been troubled for some time past with rheumatism, and a week ago took a severe cold which brought on a persistent cough and finally resulted indirectly in his death, as above stated. He had been seriously ill only since Sunday evening.
Col. Barnes was born in Irvine, Estill county, Kentucky May 10th 1821. He entered the circuit clerk's office at an early age and prepared himself to be admitted to the bar at 21 years of age. He was married the same year he was admitted to the bar to Elizabeth Mize, of the same county. He practiced law in his native county and rose rapidly in his profession and in politics.

He was a representative in the State legislature at the age of 25 and a Senator at 30. Subsequently he practiced law till the outbreak of the war when he took a prominent part in saving Kentucky to the Union. In 1861 he was among the first to enter the field, recruiting volunteers for the Union army, and early in the war was commissioned Colonel of the 8th Kentucky Volunteer Infantry.
His regiment was a part of the Army of the Cumberland, and was in some of the hardest fought battles of the war, among which were Chickamauga, Lookout Mountain and Murphysboro. His regiment planted the colors on the top of Lookout Mountain when the enemy was routed at Chattanooga.

After returning from the army he practiced his profession till 1868, when he made an energetic canvass of the state as candidate on the Republican ticket for Governor of Kentucky.
A few years later he removed to Little Rock, Arkansas and soon became a leading member of that state. In 1874 he was elected to the constitutional convention that framed the present organic law of Arkansas, and took a prominent part in the work as leader of the judiciary committee of that body.

In 1879 President Hays tendered him the appointment of U. S. Attorney for New Mexico, which he accepted, removing to the territory and practicing law in the territorial and federal courts till 1883, when he removed his family to this place for the purpose of educating his grandchildren, Sidney and Jennie Redding.

Two years ago he was compelled to give up his law practice on account of his rheumatic trouble, and then joined his family here, where he has resided ever since.
Of his immediate family he leaves a wife and Sidney and Jennie Redding. He has two sons, Thos. H. and James K. of Ft. Smith, and Mrs. John Watts and Mrs. Judge Campbell of Wichita.

The funeral occurred at the Methodist Episcopal church in this city this afternoon, and the remains will be taken on this evening's train to Ft. Smith for burial. The G.A.R. turned out in full force for his funeral.
Col. Barnes was not a member of the G.A.R., but only last Friday he told Dr. Galbreath that he wished to join the post here, that he was getting old and could not expect to live long, but he did not wish to die outside of the G.A.R.

Article published in the Carthage Weekly Press
May 22, 1890 in Carthage, Missouri.


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