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Dr Courtney James Clark

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Dr Courtney James Clark Veteran

Birth
Laurens County, South Carolina, USA
Death
16 Aug 1893 (aged 76)
Jacksonville, Calhoun County, Alabama, USA
Burial
Selma, Dallas County, Alabama, USA Add to Map
Memorial ID
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"A Genealogy of the Clark Family", by Henry William Clark, Montgomery, Alabama - 1905:

Dr. Courtney James Clark was born October 27, 1816 in Laurens District, South Carolina. He received an ordinary academic education, read medicine and began the practice of his profession at the early age of twenty, at Jacksonville, Calhoun County (then Benton) Alabama, where he soon took a creditable position in his chosen profession. His first medical studies were under Dr. John Robert Clark, his cousin, who had a large general store at Double Cabins, Henry County, Georgia, in which the subject of this sketch was a clerk, as well as a student. His first course of medical lectures was taken at Augusta, Georgia; his second at Louisville, Kentucky, and his third and last at Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, acquitting himself with credit, and graduating with honors at each of the two last named.
In the war with Mexico he was First Assistant Surgeon of the Alabama Volunteers, where the regiment was mustered out, the time of enlistment having expired he was asked as surgeon of that regiment to fill a vacancy. He accepted the position temporarily and upon the request of the Governor of South Carolina served through with this regiment. He was on the staff of General Scott at the capture of the City of Mexico and riding with him selected for the wounded a palace of the Montezumas as a hospital. After a ratification of the treaty of peace he returned to Jacksonville, Alabama to resume the practice of his profession. He received a splendid gold medal voted him by the State of South Carolina for his service with the Palmetto Regiment.
He devoted himself actively to his profession greatly aided by his hospital experience and his reputation as a surgeon called his services into demand over several counties.
He had a literary turn of mind, was fond of the classics and pursued the study of Spanish, a taste for which he had acquired by force of circumstances in Mexico. He was one of a coterie of men who made a small part of the "Jacksonville Republican's" reputation in the state for literary style, force and brilliancy, notably was this the case in the political content for the liquidation of the State Bank. Dr. Clark ably expoused with his pen the election of Governor Martin on this issue in 1845.
On February 16, 1853 Dr. Clark married Nancy Walker Davis.
In 1861 he entered the services of his state as a volunteer in the Confederate States Army and was appointed Chief Surgeon of the 10th Alabama Regiment, Colonel James H. Forney commanding. His first service actively was upon the bloody field of the First Manassas. His abilities were quickly recognized and he was placed in charge of the Alabama Hospitals in Richmond, where he remained until they were closed and then he was ordered to Montgomery where he continued to minister to the sick and wounded Confederates until Wilson's advance April 10-12, 1865, forced him to leave or surrender. With a corps of assistants and a few nurses he followed the remnant of a tattered army to Columbus, Georgia, where he was compelled by his duties to the wounded to surrender. He however never left the operating room as the Federals invited him to assist in the care of some of their wounded which he did in the same quarters. As a mark of appreciation he was presented by the commanding officer of the Federals with a fine set of surgical instruments long afterwards prized and used by him. The fine pair of surgeons shears he presented to his wife on his return to his home in Jacksonville.
In 1866 Dr. Clark removed to Selma where he took a prominent position in his profession as well as in matters pertaining to the organizing, fostering and improving the public school system. He was largely instrumental in separating the school from the uncertain mill of municipal politics as to the money for its maintenance. While a member of the City Council and thus during the period of Reconstruction when the negroes and carpetbaggers and scalawags were in power, he succeeded in securing an amendment to the city charter which sets apart a large share of the city's revenues for the public schools, placing the funds in the control of a self-perpetuating board of the most reputable citizens of Selma. The Board of Trustees of Dallas Academy named the fine colored school the "Clark School" in his honor.
It was as a surgeon that Dr. Clark made most reputation, not only in Alabama but in the circle of skilled members of the profession in many portions of the United States. He performed many pieces of surgery not theretofore attempted, notably in tracheatomy, ankle and thigh work. He was the inventor of two surgical instruments, one a placenta hook much used now.
Dr. Clark was a member of the Presbyterian Church, a kind hearted physician and an indulgent father and a loyal friend; of outward stern and reserved manner, acquired in two army experiences, he was full of tenderness and affection for those endeared to him.
In politics he was a partisan Democrat of unwavering devotion to his people through every vicissitude. He only consented to the use of personal popularity by the Democrats to elect him to the City Council of Selma at a time when political adventures and negroes were plundering the city and piling up bonded indebtedness, other than this he declined because of his large professional business.
After a life filled with usefulness and good deeds he, as he expressed it was expecting to go to sleep as one who had diligently labored all the day, rested from his labors. He died August 16, 1893 at Jacksonville, Alabama and was buried beside his wife in the Live Oak Cemetery, Slema, Alabama. A monument marks the graves.

Born to Dr. C. J. Clark and Mrs. Nancy Walker Davis Clark, eight sons and daughters:

1. Thomas Walker Clark, March 18, 1854. Married Sallie B. Lewis.
2. Percy Clark, September 5, 1855. Married Lizzie G. McGehee.
3. Lilla Susan Clark, August 19, 1857. Married James C. Ware.
4. Sallie Walker Clark, January 27, 1860. Married Fred H. Lewin.
5. Nancy Davis Clark, February 20, 1862. Twice Married. 1st to Andrew Harris; 2nd to Griffin Goodman Sharp.
6. Mary Lee Clark, October 12, 1864 – August 23, 1870.
7. Julia Frances Clark, June 4, 1867.
8. Jessie Gray Clark, January 27, 1869. Married Floyd H. Dusinberre.
==========
1860 Calhoun County, (Jacksonville) AL Census:

#H24

C. J. Clark 43M Physician R$7,000 P$14,000 Born SC
Nancy W. Clark 26F Born AL
Thomas W. Clark 6M Born AL
Percy Clark 4M Born AL
Lilla S. Clark 3F Born AL
Sallie F. Clark 4/12F Born AL
John B Prater(?) 19M Medical Student Born AL
W. M. Findley 24M Attorney at Law Born NC
==========
1870 Dallas County, (Selma) AL Census:

#H44

Cortney Clarke 53M Physician R$6,000 P$2,000 Born SC
Nannie Clarke 36F Wife Keeping House Born AL
Thomas Clarke 16M Attending School Born AL
Percy Clarke 14M Attending School Born AL
Lilla Clarke 12F Attending School Born AL
Sally Clarke 10F Attending School Born AL
Nannie Clarke 8F Attending School Born AL
Mary Clarke 5F Born AL
Julia Clarke 3F Born AL
Jessie Clarke 1F Born AL
==========
1880 Dallas County, (Selma) AL Census:

#H108

Dr. C. J. Clark 63M Physician Born SC
N. W. Clark 40F Wife At Home Born AL
Percy Clark 24M Son Com___ Merchant Born AL
Sallie Clark 19F Daughter At Home Born AL
Nannie Clark 17F Daughter At Home Born AL
Julia Clark 13F Daughter At Home Born AL
Jessie Clark 11F Daughter At Home Born AL
*T. W. Clark 26M Son Lawyer Born AL
*B. L. Clark 19F Daughter-in-law At Home Born KY
Mary Clark 50F (Black) Servant-Cook Born MD
Lizzie Clark 28F (Black) House Servant Born MD

*Note: Thomas W. Clark and Sallie Brent Lewis were married March 12, 1879 in Selma, AL.
==========
Dallas County, Alabama Will Book 4, Pages 222 – 224.

I, Courtney J. Clark of Selma, Alabama make this my last Will.
First. I direct that my Executor, herein after appointed, shall take charge of my property and sell it at public or private sale, collect all dues that can be collected including any money in bank, and first pay my burial expenses and then all my lawful debts.

Second. I will that the sum of Three Hundred dollars shall be expended by my Estate in erecting a granite monument on my burial lot in Live Oak Cemetery, in Selma, Alabama, with the inscription "CLARK" raised or cut on it.

Third. I give and bequeath to my son Percy Clark, my gold watch and chain, and my sword used by me while serving as surgeon in the War Between the States. I also give and bequeath to my son Percy Clark, my gold Medal during his life time, to be transmitted as he may direct, to some male descendant of mine. It is my wish that this Medal, presented to me by the state of South Carolina, be thus transmitted to a male descendant of mine in perpetuity.

Fourth. I also give and bequeath to my said son Percy Clark, all of my share in the Estate of the late Thomas A. Walker, except the sum of Three Thousand Dollars to be paid out of the first money released from said share, to me if living, or to my heirs if dead, to wit: Lilla S. Ware, Sallie W. Lewin, Nannie D. Harris, Julia F. Clark, Jessie Gray Clark and Percy Clark in equal shares, share and share alike.

Fifth. I give and bequeath to Dr. James C. Clark, now of Covington, Georgia, all such books of my Medical Library as have been published within the last fifteen years, immediately preceding the date of my death.

Sixth. I give my gold headed cane to James C. Ware, my cuff and collar buttons to Fred H. Lewin, and my silver mounted cane to Andrew L. Harris, and my gold ring to Lilla S. Ware.

Seventh. I will and direct that such books of my miscellaneous library, meaning thereby all books except medical books, as my children may select, shall be divided into six parcels as near as possible of equal value, and distributed by drawing lots, among my children to wit: Percy Clark, Lilla S. Ware, Sallie W. Lewin, Nannie D. Harris, Julia F. Clark and Jessie Gray Clark. If any remain I will and bequeath them to the Trustees of Dallas Academy for the library of that school.

Eighth. I will and bequeath to my grandsons Thomas W. Clark and Courtney J. Clark, sons of Thomas W. Clark, deceased, One Hundred dollars each, in lieu of all other interest in my Estate, they being well provided for by the will of the late Thomas A. Walker.

Ninth. I have advanced several and various sums of money to my son Percy Clark, to wit, amounting to $522.23. Now in justice to my other children, I will that my said son Percy Clark, be charged with this amount, to wit, with $522.23 in settling or paying him his distribution share of the proceeds of my estate as herein after provided for.

Tenth. I hereby authorize and empower my Executor to sell without order of Court, at public or private sale, as he may deem best, any and all of my property real or personal, not herein specifically bequeathed or devised, and I will and direct, that the proceeds of my estate shall be divided equally between my six children, if living, or their heirs if dead, to wit: Percy Clark, Lilla S. Ware, Sallie W. Lewin, Nannie D. Harris, Julia F. Clark and Jessie Gray Clark, share and share alike, except Percy Clark, who is to be charged with the sum of $522.23, to be deducted from his share as before stated.

Eleventh. I appoint Horace L. Stevenson of Jacksonville, Alabama, Executor of this my Will.

In witness whereof I have signed, sealed and published and declared this instrument as my Will at Selma, Alabama on this 23rd day of April 1892.

COURTNEY J. CLARK (Seal)

The said Courtney J. Clark at said Selma, Alabama, on the said 23rd day of April 1892, signed and sealed this instrument and published and declared the same as and for his last Will. And we, at his request, and in his presence, and in the presence of each other, have hereunto written our names as subscribing witnesses.

R. O. Blakey & Goldsby King

Codicil No. 1 – I hereby revoke Section 11 of my Will appointing Horace L. Stevenson of Jacksonville, Alabama my Executor, and appoint Louis E. Jeffries of Selma, Alabama my Executor of the foregoing my last Will. Witness my hand and seal this the 16th day of November 1892.

COURTNEY J. CLARK (Seal)
"A Genealogy of the Clark Family", by Henry William Clark, Montgomery, Alabama - 1905:

Dr. Courtney James Clark was born October 27, 1816 in Laurens District, South Carolina. He received an ordinary academic education, read medicine and began the practice of his profession at the early age of twenty, at Jacksonville, Calhoun County (then Benton) Alabama, where he soon took a creditable position in his chosen profession. His first medical studies were under Dr. John Robert Clark, his cousin, who had a large general store at Double Cabins, Henry County, Georgia, in which the subject of this sketch was a clerk, as well as a student. His first course of medical lectures was taken at Augusta, Georgia; his second at Louisville, Kentucky, and his third and last at Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, acquitting himself with credit, and graduating with honors at each of the two last named.
In the war with Mexico he was First Assistant Surgeon of the Alabama Volunteers, where the regiment was mustered out, the time of enlistment having expired he was asked as surgeon of that regiment to fill a vacancy. He accepted the position temporarily and upon the request of the Governor of South Carolina served through with this regiment. He was on the staff of General Scott at the capture of the City of Mexico and riding with him selected for the wounded a palace of the Montezumas as a hospital. After a ratification of the treaty of peace he returned to Jacksonville, Alabama to resume the practice of his profession. He received a splendid gold medal voted him by the State of South Carolina for his service with the Palmetto Regiment.
He devoted himself actively to his profession greatly aided by his hospital experience and his reputation as a surgeon called his services into demand over several counties.
He had a literary turn of mind, was fond of the classics and pursued the study of Spanish, a taste for which he had acquired by force of circumstances in Mexico. He was one of a coterie of men who made a small part of the "Jacksonville Republican's" reputation in the state for literary style, force and brilliancy, notably was this the case in the political content for the liquidation of the State Bank. Dr. Clark ably expoused with his pen the election of Governor Martin on this issue in 1845.
On February 16, 1853 Dr. Clark married Nancy Walker Davis.
In 1861 he entered the services of his state as a volunteer in the Confederate States Army and was appointed Chief Surgeon of the 10th Alabama Regiment, Colonel James H. Forney commanding. His first service actively was upon the bloody field of the First Manassas. His abilities were quickly recognized and he was placed in charge of the Alabama Hospitals in Richmond, where he remained until they were closed and then he was ordered to Montgomery where he continued to minister to the sick and wounded Confederates until Wilson's advance April 10-12, 1865, forced him to leave or surrender. With a corps of assistants and a few nurses he followed the remnant of a tattered army to Columbus, Georgia, where he was compelled by his duties to the wounded to surrender. He however never left the operating room as the Federals invited him to assist in the care of some of their wounded which he did in the same quarters. As a mark of appreciation he was presented by the commanding officer of the Federals with a fine set of surgical instruments long afterwards prized and used by him. The fine pair of surgeons shears he presented to his wife on his return to his home in Jacksonville.
In 1866 Dr. Clark removed to Selma where he took a prominent position in his profession as well as in matters pertaining to the organizing, fostering and improving the public school system. He was largely instrumental in separating the school from the uncertain mill of municipal politics as to the money for its maintenance. While a member of the City Council and thus during the period of Reconstruction when the negroes and carpetbaggers and scalawags were in power, he succeeded in securing an amendment to the city charter which sets apart a large share of the city's revenues for the public schools, placing the funds in the control of a self-perpetuating board of the most reputable citizens of Selma. The Board of Trustees of Dallas Academy named the fine colored school the "Clark School" in his honor.
It was as a surgeon that Dr. Clark made most reputation, not only in Alabama but in the circle of skilled members of the profession in many portions of the United States. He performed many pieces of surgery not theretofore attempted, notably in tracheatomy, ankle and thigh work. He was the inventor of two surgical instruments, one a placenta hook much used now.
Dr. Clark was a member of the Presbyterian Church, a kind hearted physician and an indulgent father and a loyal friend; of outward stern and reserved manner, acquired in two army experiences, he was full of tenderness and affection for those endeared to him.
In politics he was a partisan Democrat of unwavering devotion to his people through every vicissitude. He only consented to the use of personal popularity by the Democrats to elect him to the City Council of Selma at a time when political adventures and negroes were plundering the city and piling up bonded indebtedness, other than this he declined because of his large professional business.
After a life filled with usefulness and good deeds he, as he expressed it was expecting to go to sleep as one who had diligently labored all the day, rested from his labors. He died August 16, 1893 at Jacksonville, Alabama and was buried beside his wife in the Live Oak Cemetery, Slema, Alabama. A monument marks the graves.

Born to Dr. C. J. Clark and Mrs. Nancy Walker Davis Clark, eight sons and daughters:

1. Thomas Walker Clark, March 18, 1854. Married Sallie B. Lewis.
2. Percy Clark, September 5, 1855. Married Lizzie G. McGehee.
3. Lilla Susan Clark, August 19, 1857. Married James C. Ware.
4. Sallie Walker Clark, January 27, 1860. Married Fred H. Lewin.
5. Nancy Davis Clark, February 20, 1862. Twice Married. 1st to Andrew Harris; 2nd to Griffin Goodman Sharp.
6. Mary Lee Clark, October 12, 1864 – August 23, 1870.
7. Julia Frances Clark, June 4, 1867.
8. Jessie Gray Clark, January 27, 1869. Married Floyd H. Dusinberre.
==========
1860 Calhoun County, (Jacksonville) AL Census:

#H24

C. J. Clark 43M Physician R$7,000 P$14,000 Born SC
Nancy W. Clark 26F Born AL
Thomas W. Clark 6M Born AL
Percy Clark 4M Born AL
Lilla S. Clark 3F Born AL
Sallie F. Clark 4/12F Born AL
John B Prater(?) 19M Medical Student Born AL
W. M. Findley 24M Attorney at Law Born NC
==========
1870 Dallas County, (Selma) AL Census:

#H44

Cortney Clarke 53M Physician R$6,000 P$2,000 Born SC
Nannie Clarke 36F Wife Keeping House Born AL
Thomas Clarke 16M Attending School Born AL
Percy Clarke 14M Attending School Born AL
Lilla Clarke 12F Attending School Born AL
Sally Clarke 10F Attending School Born AL
Nannie Clarke 8F Attending School Born AL
Mary Clarke 5F Born AL
Julia Clarke 3F Born AL
Jessie Clarke 1F Born AL
==========
1880 Dallas County, (Selma) AL Census:

#H108

Dr. C. J. Clark 63M Physician Born SC
N. W. Clark 40F Wife At Home Born AL
Percy Clark 24M Son Com___ Merchant Born AL
Sallie Clark 19F Daughter At Home Born AL
Nannie Clark 17F Daughter At Home Born AL
Julia Clark 13F Daughter At Home Born AL
Jessie Clark 11F Daughter At Home Born AL
*T. W. Clark 26M Son Lawyer Born AL
*B. L. Clark 19F Daughter-in-law At Home Born KY
Mary Clark 50F (Black) Servant-Cook Born MD
Lizzie Clark 28F (Black) House Servant Born MD

*Note: Thomas W. Clark and Sallie Brent Lewis were married March 12, 1879 in Selma, AL.
==========
Dallas County, Alabama Will Book 4, Pages 222 – 224.

I, Courtney J. Clark of Selma, Alabama make this my last Will.
First. I direct that my Executor, herein after appointed, shall take charge of my property and sell it at public or private sale, collect all dues that can be collected including any money in bank, and first pay my burial expenses and then all my lawful debts.

Second. I will that the sum of Three Hundred dollars shall be expended by my Estate in erecting a granite monument on my burial lot in Live Oak Cemetery, in Selma, Alabama, with the inscription "CLARK" raised or cut on it.

Third. I give and bequeath to my son Percy Clark, my gold watch and chain, and my sword used by me while serving as surgeon in the War Between the States. I also give and bequeath to my son Percy Clark, my gold Medal during his life time, to be transmitted as he may direct, to some male descendant of mine. It is my wish that this Medal, presented to me by the state of South Carolina, be thus transmitted to a male descendant of mine in perpetuity.

Fourth. I also give and bequeath to my said son Percy Clark, all of my share in the Estate of the late Thomas A. Walker, except the sum of Three Thousand Dollars to be paid out of the first money released from said share, to me if living, or to my heirs if dead, to wit: Lilla S. Ware, Sallie W. Lewin, Nannie D. Harris, Julia F. Clark, Jessie Gray Clark and Percy Clark in equal shares, share and share alike.

Fifth. I give and bequeath to Dr. James C. Clark, now of Covington, Georgia, all such books of my Medical Library as have been published within the last fifteen years, immediately preceding the date of my death.

Sixth. I give my gold headed cane to James C. Ware, my cuff and collar buttons to Fred H. Lewin, and my silver mounted cane to Andrew L. Harris, and my gold ring to Lilla S. Ware.

Seventh. I will and direct that such books of my miscellaneous library, meaning thereby all books except medical books, as my children may select, shall be divided into six parcels as near as possible of equal value, and distributed by drawing lots, among my children to wit: Percy Clark, Lilla S. Ware, Sallie W. Lewin, Nannie D. Harris, Julia F. Clark and Jessie Gray Clark. If any remain I will and bequeath them to the Trustees of Dallas Academy for the library of that school.

Eighth. I will and bequeath to my grandsons Thomas W. Clark and Courtney J. Clark, sons of Thomas W. Clark, deceased, One Hundred dollars each, in lieu of all other interest in my Estate, they being well provided for by the will of the late Thomas A. Walker.

Ninth. I have advanced several and various sums of money to my son Percy Clark, to wit, amounting to $522.23. Now in justice to my other children, I will that my said son Percy Clark, be charged with this amount, to wit, with $522.23 in settling or paying him his distribution share of the proceeds of my estate as herein after provided for.

Tenth. I hereby authorize and empower my Executor to sell without order of Court, at public or private sale, as he may deem best, any and all of my property real or personal, not herein specifically bequeathed or devised, and I will and direct, that the proceeds of my estate shall be divided equally between my six children, if living, or their heirs if dead, to wit: Percy Clark, Lilla S. Ware, Sallie W. Lewin, Nannie D. Harris, Julia F. Clark and Jessie Gray Clark, share and share alike, except Percy Clark, who is to be charged with the sum of $522.23, to be deducted from his share as before stated.

Eleventh. I appoint Horace L. Stevenson of Jacksonville, Alabama, Executor of this my Will.

In witness whereof I have signed, sealed and published and declared this instrument as my Will at Selma, Alabama on this 23rd day of April 1892.

COURTNEY J. CLARK (Seal)

The said Courtney J. Clark at said Selma, Alabama, on the said 23rd day of April 1892, signed and sealed this instrument and published and declared the same as and for his last Will. And we, at his request, and in his presence, and in the presence of each other, have hereunto written our names as subscribing witnesses.

R. O. Blakey & Goldsby King

Codicil No. 1 – I hereby revoke Section 11 of my Will appointing Horace L. Stevenson of Jacksonville, Alabama my Executor, and appoint Louis E. Jeffries of Selma, Alabama my Executor of the foregoing my last Will. Witness my hand and seal this the 16th day of November 1892.

COURTNEY J. CLARK (Seal)


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