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MAJ Jack A Abadie

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MAJ Jack A Abadie

Birth
Death
22 Dec 2005 (aged 82)
Burial
Arlington, Arlington County, Virginia, USA
Plot
Section 64, Grave 2280
Memorial ID
32220883 View Source

Jack Austin Abadie was born July 16, 1923, and died peacefully at home Thursday, Dec. 22, 2005, from complications of diabetes. He was 82, a native of New Orleans and a longtime resident of Baton Rouge. He was a combat veteran of three wars, World War II, Korea and Vietnam. During World War II, he was a bombardier with the 95th Bomber Group and was shot down over Leipzig in 1944. He endured interment at several POW camps and on April 29, 1945, was liberated along with the other prisoners of war of Mooseberg by Gen. Patton's 3rd and 7th Armies. Instead of returning home right away he then marched with Patton and was with this combined force when they went to Dachau the afternoon it was liberated. After World War II, he returned to Baton Rouge and was a grateful recipient of the GI Bill. He finished his second year of law school when the Korean War began. He volunteered to return to the U.S. Army infantry with his reserve unit and it was when he was en route to Korea that he learned that he had actually passed the bar exam. He had varied assignments during his 27 years in the military which included JAG, U.S. Army Intelligence, ROTC instructor at UCLA, Nuclear Weapons officer, Special Forces, Department of Defense Liaison to the White House, U.S. Army Public Affairs Officer, U.S. Advisor to the Republic of Vietnam Army, Battalion Commander and NATO Plans officer at Keflavik, Iceland. He retired from active duty as garrison commandant of Fort Meyer, Virginia. He was the recipient of many citations and medals, including the Bronze Star and the Republic of Vietnam Companion Ribbon with Palms. After retirement he worked for the Department of Health, Education and Welfare as an auditor for the college student loan program. One of his proudest moments with HEW was when he uncovered a student loan scam in Dallas. As a result of his diligent work he sent 31 people to federal prison. He then decided to retire to his home state with his family and went back to LSU and received a degree in accounting. He worked for eight years as a state auditor. He served his community in several organizations such as the LSU Track and Field Officials and was a member of both the Greater Baton Rouge Area Military Officers Association and Red Stick Chapter of POWs. He is survived by his wife, Betty "Elizabeth;" son, Patrick; three brothers, Bill Abadie, Albert "Buddy" and wife Ruth, and Guy Abadie and wife Bootsie; two sisters, June Munster and Jean Carmack and husband Bill; sister-in-law, Carol Abadie; and several nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by his parents, Albert and Geralda Abadie; and youngest brother, Ray Abadie. Visitation at Rabenhorst Funeral Home, 825 Government St., on Monday, Dec. 26, from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. with recitation of the rosary at 7 p.m. Visiting will continue at St. Joseph Cathedral on Tuesday, Dec. 27, from 9 a.m. until Mass of Christian Burial at 10 a.m. Interment with full military honors in Arlington National Cemetery, Virginia, on Thursday, Feb. 9, 2006, at 11 a.m. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to St. Joseph Hospice, the Baton Rouge Symphony or St. Joseph's Cathedral.

Jack Austin Abadie was born July 16, 1923, and died peacefully at home Thursday, Dec. 22, 2005, from complications of diabetes. He was 82, a native of New Orleans and a longtime resident of Baton Rouge. He was a combat veteran of three wars, World War II, Korea and Vietnam. During World War II, he was a bombardier with the 95th Bomber Group and was shot down over Leipzig in 1944. He endured interment at several POW camps and on April 29, 1945, was liberated along with the other prisoners of war of Mooseberg by Gen. Patton's 3rd and 7th Armies. Instead of returning home right away he then marched with Patton and was with this combined force when they went to Dachau the afternoon it was liberated. After World War II, he returned to Baton Rouge and was a grateful recipient of the GI Bill. He finished his second year of law school when the Korean War began. He volunteered to return to the U.S. Army infantry with his reserve unit and it was when he was en route to Korea that he learned that he had actually passed the bar exam. He had varied assignments during his 27 years in the military which included JAG, U.S. Army Intelligence, ROTC instructor at UCLA, Nuclear Weapons officer, Special Forces, Department of Defense Liaison to the White House, U.S. Army Public Affairs Officer, U.S. Advisor to the Republic of Vietnam Army, Battalion Commander and NATO Plans officer at Keflavik, Iceland. He retired from active duty as garrison commandant of Fort Meyer, Virginia. He was the recipient of many citations and medals, including the Bronze Star and the Republic of Vietnam Companion Ribbon with Palms. After retirement he worked for the Department of Health, Education and Welfare as an auditor for the college student loan program. One of his proudest moments with HEW was when he uncovered a student loan scam in Dallas. As a result of his diligent work he sent 31 people to federal prison. He then decided to retire to his home state with his family and went back to LSU and received a degree in accounting. He worked for eight years as a state auditor. He served his community in several organizations such as the LSU Track and Field Officials and was a member of both the Greater Baton Rouge Area Military Officers Association and Red Stick Chapter of POWs. He is survived by his wife, Betty "Elizabeth;" son, Patrick; three brothers, Bill Abadie, Albert "Buddy" and wife Ruth, and Guy Abadie and wife Bootsie; two sisters, June Munster and Jean Carmack and husband Bill; sister-in-law, Carol Abadie; and several nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by his parents, Albert and Geralda Abadie; and youngest brother, Ray Abadie. Visitation at Rabenhorst Funeral Home, 825 Government St., on Monday, Dec. 26, from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. with recitation of the rosary at 7 p.m. Visiting will continue at St. Joseph Cathedral on Tuesday, Dec. 27, from 9 a.m. until Mass of Christian Burial at 10 a.m. Interment with full military honors in Arlington National Cemetery, Virginia, on Thursday, Feb. 9, 2006, at 11 a.m. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to St. Joseph Hospice, the Baton Rouge Symphony or St. Joseph's Cathedral.


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US Army
World War II
Korea
Vietnam
Bronze Star
Prisoner Of War


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