COL Larkin Green Cleveland

COL Larkin Green Cleveland

Birth
Orange County, Virginia, USA
Death
9 Jul 1814 (aged 66)
Giles County, Tennessee, USA
Burial
Giles County, Tennessee, USA
Memorial ID
30491412 View Source

On October 7, 1780 the foundation that would forever change the world was established. Fewer than one thousand American Heroes, through skill, luck, and the leadership of cunning strategists, defeated Patrick Ferguson, a brilliant star of the British military might. Larkin Cleveland was en route to the battle.

In "King's Mountain and Its Heroes", Lyman C. Draper wrote that while crossing the Catawba River, "Lieutenant Cleveland, with the advance, after having passed a narrow defile between a rocky cliff and the stream, was shot by some concealed Tories in the cliff, severely wounding him in the thigh. The Loyalists had learned of Colonel Cleveland's march, and had resolved on his destruction, hoping thereby to cripple the expedition and possibly defeat its object. Colonel Cleveland and his brother very much resembled each other in size and general appearance and the Tories probably mistook the latter for the Colonel."

Draper recorded that Cleveland's men sent him up the river in a canoe and they continued to Quaker Meadows where they were greeted joyfully by the McDowells and the mountaineers. "Here Lieutenant Cleveland was confided to the care of the widowed mother of the McDowells, (the brave Margaret "Mary" O'Neil McDowell) who bestowed every attention upon the unfortunate officer. Though he in time recovered, he was a cripple for life."

Although Lt. (later Captain) Larkin Cleveland was incapacitated, the Cleveland family was well represented at the battle. Indeed, the Battle of King's Mountain was a family affair for the Cleveland family as it was for so many other families. His brother, Colonel Benjamin Cleveland, played a key role. According to legend, Cleveland climbed up Rendezvous Mountain and blew his horn to summon some 200 Wilkes County militiamen and led them in the battle. In the fierce fighting, Cleveland's horse was shot from under him. Don Troiani's oil painting "Colonel Cleveland's War Prize – October 7, 1780" depicts the prize Cleveland claimed: the slain Ferguson's beloved white stallion which Cleveland rode home to his estate of Roundabout.

The presence of another brother, Robert Cleveland, proved vital. He rallied the militiamen during the heat of the battle, contributing to the patriot victory.

With the same blood coursing through his veins as those tried and true officers, Larkin Cleveland's nephew, son of the colonel, fought and fought valiantly on the mountain. Due to his tenacity and fearlessness in the battle, he earned his soubriquet, "Devil John" Cleveland.

The DAR recognized the Revolutionary War service of four of the Cleveland brothers. The organization assigned to each DAR Ancestor Numbers:

Col Benjamin Cleveland, DAR #A023058
Cpt Robert Cleveland, DAR #A023112
Rev John H. Cleveland, DAR #A023094
Cpt Larkin Cleveland, DAR #A023103

The Cleveland brothers were members of the large brood born to John Cleveland and Elizabeth Coffey. Larkin Cleveland married Frances Wright in February 1773 and had their own large family. Their children included:

Elizabeth Cleveland
Sally Cleveland
Benjamin Cleveland
David Cleveland
Rhoda Cleveland
Abner Cleveland
Oliver Cromwell Cleveland
Asenath Cleveland
Lucinda Cleveland
Carter Harrison Cleveland

Truly, the Cleveland family made important contributions to American history. May this memorial serve as an expression of the gratitude we owe Captain Cleveland and his family members for risking their lives and braving the unknown to help build a new country: our America.

On October 7, 1780 the foundation that would forever change the world was established. Fewer than one thousand American Heroes, through skill, luck, and the leadership of cunning strategists, defeated Patrick Ferguson, a brilliant star of the British military might. Larkin Cleveland was en route to the battle.

In "King's Mountain and Its Heroes", Lyman C. Draper wrote that while crossing the Catawba River, "Lieutenant Cleveland, with the advance, after having passed a narrow defile between a rocky cliff and the stream, was shot by some concealed Tories in the cliff, severely wounding him in the thigh. The Loyalists had learned of Colonel Cleveland's march, and had resolved on his destruction, hoping thereby to cripple the expedition and possibly defeat its object. Colonel Cleveland and his brother very much resembled each other in size and general appearance and the Tories probably mistook the latter for the Colonel."

Draper recorded that Cleveland's men sent him up the river in a canoe and they continued to Quaker Meadows where they were greeted joyfully by the McDowells and the mountaineers. "Here Lieutenant Cleveland was confided to the care of the widowed mother of the McDowells, (the brave Margaret "Mary" O'Neil McDowell) who bestowed every attention upon the unfortunate officer. Though he in time recovered, he was a cripple for life."

Although Lt. (later Captain) Larkin Cleveland was incapacitated, the Cleveland family was well represented at the battle. Indeed, the Battle of King's Mountain was a family affair for the Cleveland family as it was for so many other families. His brother, Colonel Benjamin Cleveland, played a key role. According to legend, Cleveland climbed up Rendezvous Mountain and blew his horn to summon some 200 Wilkes County militiamen and led them in the battle. In the fierce fighting, Cleveland's horse was shot from under him. Don Troiani's oil painting "Colonel Cleveland's War Prize – October 7, 1780" depicts the prize Cleveland claimed: the slain Ferguson's beloved white stallion which Cleveland rode home to his estate of Roundabout.

The presence of another brother, Robert Cleveland, proved vital. He rallied the militiamen during the heat of the battle, contributing to the patriot victory.

With the same blood coursing through his veins as those tried and true officers, Larkin Cleveland's nephew, son of the colonel, fought and fought valiantly on the mountain. Due to his tenacity and fearlessness in the battle, he earned his soubriquet, "Devil John" Cleveland.

The DAR recognized the Revolutionary War service of four of the Cleveland brothers. The organization assigned to each DAR Ancestor Numbers:

Col Benjamin Cleveland, DAR #A023058
Cpt Robert Cleveland, DAR #A023112
Rev John H. Cleveland, DAR #A023094
Cpt Larkin Cleveland, DAR #A023103

The Cleveland brothers were members of the large brood born to John Cleveland and Elizabeth Coffey. Larkin Cleveland married Frances Wright in February 1773 and had their own large family. Their children included:

Elizabeth Cleveland
Sally Cleveland
Benjamin Cleveland
David Cleveland
Rhoda Cleveland
Abner Cleveland
Oliver Cromwell Cleveland
Asenath Cleveland
Lucinda Cleveland
Carter Harrison Cleveland

Truly, the Cleveland family made important contributions to American history. May this memorial serve as an expression of the gratitude we owe Captain Cleveland and his family members for risking their lives and braving the unknown to help build a new country: our America.


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