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CPT Peter B. Ayars

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CPT Peter B. Ayars Veteran

Birth
Death
10 Jan 1904 (aged 61)
Burial
Wilmington, New Castle County, Delaware, USA Add to Map
Plot
Section 11
Memorial ID
View Source
"PETER B. AYARS, Wilmington, Del., son of Benjamin D. and Jane Ann (Elkinton) Ayars, was born in Bridgeport, N. J., April 17, 1842.

His paternal ancestors were Scotch; the maternal, French. Noah Ayars, greatgrandfather of Peter B. Ayars, was born in Ayrshire, Scotland, and was among the passengers the good ship Mayflower brought to America on her second trip westward over the Atlantic. He made his first home in this country with the original settlers at Plymouth, Mass. Afterwards he removed to Cumberland county, N. J., and, it is said, founded the town of Bridgeton. He was a soldier in the Revolutionary war, and his certificate of discharge from the Continental army is now in possession of Peter B. Ayars, who has, also, it may be mentioned here, the certificate of the discharge of his maternal grandfather, Benjamin DuBois, from the same army of patriots.

Noah Ayars, 2, grandfather of Peter B. Ayars, and son of Noah Ayars, is supposed to have been born in Bridgeton, N. J. It is certain that he was educated there, engaged in business, died, and was buried there. He married Miss DuBois. Among their children were Robert, Joseph, Noah, 3, and Benjamin D. Noah Ayars, 3, is the only survivor of the family. He is still living in Bridgeton, at an advanced age. His wife died in Philadelphia in 1861, and is buried in that city.

Benjamin D. Ayars, father of Peter B. Ayars, was born in Bridgeton, N. J., in October, 1812. He attended the schools of that place and resided there during his youth. When old enough to begin a trade, he went to Philadelphia and learned carpentry, in which occupation he was engaged until his death. Benjamin D. Ayars married Jane Ann, daughter of John and Eliza Elkinton. Their children were: I. Elizabeth (Mrs. George Zane), of Bridgeport, N. J., deceased, as is her husband also, had children, i. Elizabeth (Mrs. Andrew Henry), of Lebanon, Pa., ii. Georgiana (Mrs. Elwood Tussey), of Wilmington, Del.; II. Benjamin, of Chester, Pa., married Elizabeth Steelman, had one child, Benjamin, 2, patentee of the "Ayars' Mail Catcher and Deliverer," died in 1895, aged twenty-four; III. John B. died in 1859, from smallpox; IV. William H. H. died in 1866; V. Peter B.; VI. Mary J. (Mrs. Stratton Mitchell), of Chester, Pa., had children, i. George H., ii. Clinton R., iii. Isaac M., iv. Bertha, all of Chester; VII. George W. accidentally choked to death, at the age of eighteen; VIII. Charles, died aged twenty, from cold and exposure; IX. Amanda (Mrs. Emmit F. Stidham), of Wilmington. Mr. Stidham was at one time coroner of New Castle county, Del. Benjamin D. Ayars died in Chester, Pa., November 25, 1888; his wife in Bridgeport, N. J., in 1855, where they are both buried.

Peter B. Ayars lived in Bridgeport until he was nine years old and then came to Wilmington, where he attended .the public schools and Traverse Academy. When he reached the age of sixteen he returned to Bridgeport and learned carriage blacksmithing. He worked at his trade until the breaking out of the Civil War, when he was among the first to offer his services for the preservation of the Union.

On May 25, 1861, Mr. Ayars enlisted in Philadelphia, in Company E, Thirty-second regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteers; the regimental number was changed to ninety-ninth Pennsylvania Volunteers. He participated in every important engagement of the Army of the Potomac until April 6, 1865, the day of the battle of Sailor's Creek, Va. In all, he fought in fifty-four battles, always bravely and always in the forefront but not without severe injuries to himself. He was several times wounded, first at Spottsylvania Court House, Va., May 15, 1864, when he received a bullet in his left shoulder. At the battle of Petersburg, October 28, 1864, he was wounded in the right leg, and on April 6, 1865, he lost his left arm at the battle of Sailor's Creek, Va. Mr. Ayars was a gallant soldier, fearless in the face of danger and undaunted by the most imposing array of the enemy, and his services for his country were fitly rewarded by numerous promotions. He entered the army as a private and passed through all the grades of non-commissioned officers. In April, 1864 he was promoted to second lieutenant, and in June, 1864, he was commissioned first lieutenant of his company. On April 6, 1865, when his arm was shot off, he was acting adjutant of his regiment. He was discharged with the rank of captain, May 15, 1865, at the officers' hospital, Annapolis, Md., under Special Order, No. 82, which discharged all officers in the hospital at that time.

When the war was over he went to Chester, Pa., and there learned telegraphy. In the fall of 1865 he removed to Wilmington and was employed as an operator in the railroad service of the Philadelphia, Wilmington and Baltimore Railroad. He remained in said service for nine years and was then tendered a position in the Wilmington post office. He accepted it and was a popular and faithful attache of the office for a period of fourteen years. The past nine years he has held the office of deputy collector and inspector of customs at Wilmington, and has proved a capable and efficient appointee. He is a member of DuPont Post, No. 2, G. A. R., of Wilmington, and past junior vice-commander-in-chief of the Grand Army of the Republic. Mr. Ayars is, also, supreme commander of the Legion of the Red Cross. He holds membership in the State Historical Society and the Sons of the Revolution. He is a staunch Republican and an active party worker.

On May 16, 1865, in Chester, Pa., Peter B. Ayars married Annie E., daughter of Harper and Margaret J. Dunn, of Philadelphia, Pa. Mrs. Ayars was born in Philadelphia, December 2, 1848. Their children are: I. Clara (Mrs. Joseph N. Warren), of Chester, has children, i. Esther, ii. Thomas N., iii. Edward, iv. Jay, v. George; II. Margaret J. (Mrs. John C. Green), of Wilmington, has children, i. John C., 2, ii. Alice A.; III. Florence (Mrs. George Cox), of Wilmington; has two children, Margaret and George Edward Cox; IV. Edward F. J., student in Delaware College, Newark, Del.; enlisted in the war against Spain as sergeant of Company M, First Delaware Infantry, United States Volunteers, April, 1898; V. Anna D., and VI. Elizabeth, twins, the latter died in infancy; VII. Harper, died in infancy. Mr. Ayars and family are members of the Delaware Avenue Baptist church, of Wilmington. Mr. Ayars is superintendent of the Sunday school and president of the New Castle County Sunday-School Association, of Delaware."

Biographical and Genealogical History of the State of Delaware, Volume I, published by J. M. Runk & Co., Chambersburg, PA., 1899
"PETER B. AYARS, Wilmington, Del., son of Benjamin D. and Jane Ann (Elkinton) Ayars, was born in Bridgeport, N. J., April 17, 1842.

His paternal ancestors were Scotch; the maternal, French. Noah Ayars, greatgrandfather of Peter B. Ayars, was born in Ayrshire, Scotland, and was among the passengers the good ship Mayflower brought to America on her second trip westward over the Atlantic. He made his first home in this country with the original settlers at Plymouth, Mass. Afterwards he removed to Cumberland county, N. J., and, it is said, founded the town of Bridgeton. He was a soldier in the Revolutionary war, and his certificate of discharge from the Continental army is now in possession of Peter B. Ayars, who has, also, it may be mentioned here, the certificate of the discharge of his maternal grandfather, Benjamin DuBois, from the same army of patriots.

Noah Ayars, 2, grandfather of Peter B. Ayars, and son of Noah Ayars, is supposed to have been born in Bridgeton, N. J. It is certain that he was educated there, engaged in business, died, and was buried there. He married Miss DuBois. Among their children were Robert, Joseph, Noah, 3, and Benjamin D. Noah Ayars, 3, is the only survivor of the family. He is still living in Bridgeton, at an advanced age. His wife died in Philadelphia in 1861, and is buried in that city.

Benjamin D. Ayars, father of Peter B. Ayars, was born in Bridgeton, N. J., in October, 1812. He attended the schools of that place and resided there during his youth. When old enough to begin a trade, he went to Philadelphia and learned carpentry, in which occupation he was engaged until his death. Benjamin D. Ayars married Jane Ann, daughter of John and Eliza Elkinton. Their children were: I. Elizabeth (Mrs. George Zane), of Bridgeport, N. J., deceased, as is her husband also, had children, i. Elizabeth (Mrs. Andrew Henry), of Lebanon, Pa., ii. Georgiana (Mrs. Elwood Tussey), of Wilmington, Del.; II. Benjamin, of Chester, Pa., married Elizabeth Steelman, had one child, Benjamin, 2, patentee of the "Ayars' Mail Catcher and Deliverer," died in 1895, aged twenty-four; III. John B. died in 1859, from smallpox; IV. William H. H. died in 1866; V. Peter B.; VI. Mary J. (Mrs. Stratton Mitchell), of Chester, Pa., had children, i. George H., ii. Clinton R., iii. Isaac M., iv. Bertha, all of Chester; VII. George W. accidentally choked to death, at the age of eighteen; VIII. Charles, died aged twenty, from cold and exposure; IX. Amanda (Mrs. Emmit F. Stidham), of Wilmington. Mr. Stidham was at one time coroner of New Castle county, Del. Benjamin D. Ayars died in Chester, Pa., November 25, 1888; his wife in Bridgeport, N. J., in 1855, where they are both buried.

Peter B. Ayars lived in Bridgeport until he was nine years old and then came to Wilmington, where he attended .the public schools and Traverse Academy. When he reached the age of sixteen he returned to Bridgeport and learned carriage blacksmithing. He worked at his trade until the breaking out of the Civil War, when he was among the first to offer his services for the preservation of the Union.

On May 25, 1861, Mr. Ayars enlisted in Philadelphia, in Company E, Thirty-second regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteers; the regimental number was changed to ninety-ninth Pennsylvania Volunteers. He participated in every important engagement of the Army of the Potomac until April 6, 1865, the day of the battle of Sailor's Creek, Va. In all, he fought in fifty-four battles, always bravely and always in the forefront but not without severe injuries to himself. He was several times wounded, first at Spottsylvania Court House, Va., May 15, 1864, when he received a bullet in his left shoulder. At the battle of Petersburg, October 28, 1864, he was wounded in the right leg, and on April 6, 1865, he lost his left arm at the battle of Sailor's Creek, Va. Mr. Ayars was a gallant soldier, fearless in the face of danger and undaunted by the most imposing array of the enemy, and his services for his country were fitly rewarded by numerous promotions. He entered the army as a private and passed through all the grades of non-commissioned officers. In April, 1864 he was promoted to second lieutenant, and in June, 1864, he was commissioned first lieutenant of his company. On April 6, 1865, when his arm was shot off, he was acting adjutant of his regiment. He was discharged with the rank of captain, May 15, 1865, at the officers' hospital, Annapolis, Md., under Special Order, No. 82, which discharged all officers in the hospital at that time.

When the war was over he went to Chester, Pa., and there learned telegraphy. In the fall of 1865 he removed to Wilmington and was employed as an operator in the railroad service of the Philadelphia, Wilmington and Baltimore Railroad. He remained in said service for nine years and was then tendered a position in the Wilmington post office. He accepted it and was a popular and faithful attache of the office for a period of fourteen years. The past nine years he has held the office of deputy collector and inspector of customs at Wilmington, and has proved a capable and efficient appointee. He is a member of DuPont Post, No. 2, G. A. R., of Wilmington, and past junior vice-commander-in-chief of the Grand Army of the Republic. Mr. Ayars is, also, supreme commander of the Legion of the Red Cross. He holds membership in the State Historical Society and the Sons of the Revolution. He is a staunch Republican and an active party worker.

On May 16, 1865, in Chester, Pa., Peter B. Ayars married Annie E., daughter of Harper and Margaret J. Dunn, of Philadelphia, Pa. Mrs. Ayars was born in Philadelphia, December 2, 1848. Their children are: I. Clara (Mrs. Joseph N. Warren), of Chester, has children, i. Esther, ii. Thomas N., iii. Edward, iv. Jay, v. George; II. Margaret J. (Mrs. John C. Green), of Wilmington, has children, i. John C., 2, ii. Alice A.; III. Florence (Mrs. George Cox), of Wilmington; has two children, Margaret and George Edward Cox; IV. Edward F. J., student in Delaware College, Newark, Del.; enlisted in the war against Spain as sergeant of Company M, First Delaware Infantry, United States Volunteers, April, 1898; V. Anna D., and VI. Elizabeth, twins, the latter died in infancy; VII. Harper, died in infancy. Mr. Ayars and family are members of the Delaware Avenue Baptist church, of Wilmington. Mr. Ayars is superintendent of the Sunday school and president of the New Castle County Sunday-School Association, of Delaware."

Biographical and Genealogical History of the State of Delaware, Volume I, published by J. M. Runk & Co., Chambersburg, PA., 1899


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  • Created by: Tedd Cocker
  • Added: Oct 6, 2008
  • Find a Grave Memorial ID:
  • Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/30379433/peter_b-ayars: accessed ), memorial page for CPT Peter B. Ayars (17 Apr 1842–10 Jan 1904), Find a Grave Memorial ID 30379433, citing Riverview Cemetery, Wilmington, New Castle County, Delaware, USA; Maintained by Tedd Cocker (contributor 47025283).