Ludwick Holt

Ludwick Holt

Birth
Bedford County, Tennessee, USA
Death
8 Feb 1868 (aged 27)
White Settlement, Tarrant County, Texas, USA
Burial
Fort Worth, Tarrant County, Texas, USA GPS-Latitude: 32.7686394, Longitude: -97.3514444
Plot
block 52 lot 55 1/2 space 4
Memorial ID
View Source
Ludwick was the son of William W.Holt and his wife, Louisa Troxler Holt. He enlisted as a private with Company I, 14th Cavalry (Johnson's Mounted Volunteers, 1st Regiment, Johnson's Brigade). on Jan. 11, 1862, at Johnson Station, TX (now in Arlington, TX, vicinity of Cooper Street south of UTA)
by Capt Stephen C. Ragan, for a period of 1 year

Ludwick (a/k/a Lodwick) was captured Sept 19, 1863, near Chicamauga, GA, by U.S.forces commanded by Maj. General William Starke Rosecrans. He was first received as a Prisoner of War at the Military Prison, Louisville, KY, Sep 5, 1863,
(Note by Dee Ann: Yes, I copied the dates right. I don't know how he could have sent to prison on Sep 5, when he was captured on the 19th--; whoever misentered the information probably meant Sep. 25.)

Then he was transferred to and received at the infamous Camp Douglas, Chicago, IL Oct. 4,1863. He stayed there and was transferred on May 4, 1865, "Forwarded to New Orleans for Exchange" He was exchanged on May 23, 1865.

He lived about 2 years 8 months after his exchange from Camp Douglas.

Another relative found information in a 1949 Fort Worth Star Telegram article about his sister, Ella Holt Young that tells of Lody's and his brother, Leighton's, return from the Civil War:
"She does remember well one day in late summer 1865 seeing some ragged, dirty men, heavily bearded and walking slowly up the road to the Hart farm. She and her brothers, Dempsey and Gordy, were playing in the yard and as the strangers turned into the farm lane, the children took flight and ran. The men were dirty and rough looking saw their mother and older sisters run to greet the "tramps" hugging them and laughing and crying at the same time, so the children took courage and joined in the welcome to the returned soldiers."
"They had walked all the way from New Orleans, Mrs. Young says, " and they seemed just about dead to us children..."
The article goes on about their mother getting out the spinning wheels and looms and making clothes, and other things that were done.
NOTE: No information found here can be used for any commercial purpose unless you get legal permission from the appropriate source.

Ludwick was married to Mary Eddy of Fort Worth, Tarrant, TX. Mary under the name of Mollie or Millie is living with the Eddy family on the 1970 census. I'm still looking for information.

His body was moved from White Settlement Cemetery to Oakwood Cemetery in 1953.
Ludwick was the son of William W.Holt and his wife, Louisa Troxler Holt. He enlisted as a private with Company I, 14th Cavalry (Johnson's Mounted Volunteers, 1st Regiment, Johnson's Brigade). on Jan. 11, 1862, at Johnson Station, TX (now in Arlington, TX, vicinity of Cooper Street south of UTA)
by Capt Stephen C. Ragan, for a period of 1 year

Ludwick (a/k/a Lodwick) was captured Sept 19, 1863, near Chicamauga, GA, by U.S.forces commanded by Maj. General William Starke Rosecrans. He was first received as a Prisoner of War at the Military Prison, Louisville, KY, Sep 5, 1863,
(Note by Dee Ann: Yes, I copied the dates right. I don't know how he could have sent to prison on Sep 5, when he was captured on the 19th--; whoever misentered the information probably meant Sep. 25.)

Then he was transferred to and received at the infamous Camp Douglas, Chicago, IL Oct. 4,1863. He stayed there and was transferred on May 4, 1865, "Forwarded to New Orleans for Exchange" He was exchanged on May 23, 1865.

He lived about 2 years 8 months after his exchange from Camp Douglas.

Another relative found information in a 1949 Fort Worth Star Telegram article about his sister, Ella Holt Young that tells of Lody's and his brother, Leighton's, return from the Civil War:
"She does remember well one day in late summer 1865 seeing some ragged, dirty men, heavily bearded and walking slowly up the road to the Hart farm. She and her brothers, Dempsey and Gordy, were playing in the yard and as the strangers turned into the farm lane, the children took flight and ran. The men were dirty and rough looking saw their mother and older sisters run to greet the "tramps" hugging them and laughing and crying at the same time, so the children took courage and joined in the welcome to the returned soldiers."
"They had walked all the way from New Orleans, Mrs. Young says, " and they seemed just about dead to us children..."
The article goes on about their mother getting out the spinning wheels and looms and making clothes, and other things that were done.
NOTE: No information found here can be used for any commercial purpose unless you get legal permission from the appropriate source.

Ludwick was married to Mary Eddy of Fort Worth, Tarrant, TX. Mary under the name of Mollie or Millie is living with the Eddy family on the 1970 census. I'm still looking for information.

His body was moved from White Settlement Cemetery to Oakwood Cemetery in 1953.