The Photo Request has been fulfilled.

 
 Jacob Loucks Devers

Jacob Loucks Devers

Birth
York, York County, Pennsylvania, USA
Death 15 Oct 1979 (aged 92)
Washington, District of Columbia, District Of Columbia, USA
Burial Arlington, Arlington County, Virginia, USA
Plot Section 1, Lot 149-F, Grid MN-33/34
Memorial ID 2995 · View Source
Suggest Edits

United States Army General. A World War II combat veteran, he rose in rank to become the Commanding General of the 6th US Army Group and Commander of the US Army Ground Forces. The oldest of four children, his father was a watchmaker and part owner of a jewelry store. He attended York High School in Your, Pennsylvania where he excelled in sports. Following his graduation in May 1905, he received an appointment to the US Military Academy at West Point, New York and excelled in sports while there. In June 1909 he graduated with a commission as a 2nd lieutenant in the Field Artillery. Following several stateside assignments, he returned to West Point in 1912 as a mathematics instructor and manage the baseball team. In 1916 he was assigned to the 9th Field Artillery Regiment at Schofield Barracks, Oahu, Hawaii and returned to the US in December 1917 and served as Commanding Officer of the 1st Field Artillery Regiment at Fort Sill, Oklahoma. Following a brief assignment with the Army of Occupation in Europe, he returned to West Point where he was promoted to the rank of major and became the Senior Field Artillery Instructor. In 1924 he attended the US Army Command and General Staff School at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas and following his graduation in 1925, he returned to Fort Sill where he became head of the Field Artillery School's Gunnery Department. In September 1929 he was assigned to US Army Headquarters in Washington DC as Chief of Field Artillery (Operations and Training). While there, he attended the US Army War College (then in Washington DC) and after graduating in 1933 he was assigned to the 6th Field Artillery Regiment at Fort Hoyle, Maryland and promoted to the rank of lieutenant colonel. The following year he became Commander of the 1st Battalion, 16th Field Artillery Regiment at Fort Meyer, Virginia. In 1936 he returned to West Point for the third time and served on the Headquarters Staff as Executive of Construction and Graduate Manager of Athletics. In July 1938 he was promoted to the rank of colonel and became Chief of Staff for Major General Daniel Van Voorhis, The following year he transferred with Voorhis to the Panama Canal Zone. In April 1940 he was promoted to the rank of brigadier general and became the youngest officer of that grade in the US Army. The following July he became Commander of the Washington DC's District Provisional Brigade and two months later was appointed to serve as the Senior US Army Representative to the Presidential Board. In October 1940 he was promoted to the rank of major general and became commander of the newly formed 9th Infantry Division at Fort Bragg, North Carolina and was responsible for vastly expanding the installation as the number of soldiers grew from about 5,000 to 60,000 during his tenure there. In August 1941 he was assigned to Fort Knox, Kentucky as Chief of the US Army's Armored Force. During his time at Fort Knox, it grew from two armored divisions to 16 divisions and 63 separate tank battalions. In September 1942 he was promoted to the rank of lieutenant general and in May 1943 he became the Commanding General European Theater of Operations US Army at London, England, replacing General Dwight D. Eisenhower who had become Commander-in-Chief Allied Forces Headquarters, and participated in the Allied invasion of Europe at Normandy, France on June 6, 1944 (Operation Overlord), as well as the Allied invasion of southern France on August 15, 1944 (Operation Dragoon). In September 1944 he became Commanding General of the US 6th Army and was involved in the Battle of the Bulge in December of that year, the Colmar Pocket of Alsace, France in January and February 1945, and the invasion of mainland Germany (Operation Plunder) when his forces crossed the Rhine River in March 1945 which led to the ultimate defeat of Germany. In March 1945 he was promoted to the rank of general and became Commander of the US Army Ground Forces until 1948 when he became Chief of US Army Field Forces and retired in that position in September 1949 with 40 years of continuous military service. Among his military awards and decorations include the Army Distinguished Service Medal (with two oak leaf clusters), the Navy Distinguished Service Medal, the Bronze Star, the American Defense Service Medal, the American Campaign Medal, the World War II Victory Medal, the European-African-Middle Eastern Campaign Medal (with six service stars and arrowhead device), and the post-World War II Army of Occupation of Germany Medal. Following his military retirement, he was assistant to the president of Fairchild Aircraft Company (now defunct) and from 1960 until 1969 he served as chairman of the American Battle Monuments Commission in Arlington, Virginia. He died in Washington DC at the age of 92.

Bio by: William Bjornstad


Family Members

Parents
Spouse
Children

Advertisement

Advertisement

Advertisement

How famous was Jacob Loucks Devers?

Current rating:

32 votes

Sign-in to cast your vote.

  • Maintained by: Find A Grave
  • Added: 2 Jun 1998
  • Find A Grave Memorial 2995
  • Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed ), memorial page for Jacob Loucks Devers (8 Sep 1887–15 Oct 1979), Find A Grave Memorial no. 2995, citing Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Arlington County, Virginia, USA ; Maintained by Find A Grave .