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Charles J. T. McIntire

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Charles J. T. McIntire

Birth
New Bloomfield, Perry County, Pennsylvania, USA
Death
Mar 1886 (aged 56)
New Bloomfield, Perry County, Pennsylvania, USA
Burial
New Bloomfield, Perry County, Pennsylvania, USA Add to Map
Memorial ID
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Our community was startled on Sabath morning to heard of the death of Hon. C.J.T. McIntire, at his residence, in this place,(New Bloomfiled,) shortly after ten o'clock on Saturday night. Although his demise was not unexpected, and it was generally known that his symptoms some days previous had assumed an alarming nature, yet such wonderful vitality had been shown throughout his long illness, when many times the dread messenger had knocked at the portal, that it was thought he might possibly survive the attack; and while all hoped for the best the worst came.
The deceased was born in Bloomfield, January 3, 1830, and was consequently at the time of his death aged 56 years, 2 months, and 10 days. At the early age of thirteen years he entered Dickinson College, from which honored institution he graduated four years later, the youngest member of his class, with the highest honors his Alma Mater could bestow upon him for scholastic merit. The succeening year he spent at Marshall College, Mercersburg, where he devoted himself exclusively to the study of the German language.
At the termination of his German course at Mercersburg, he entered the law office of his father, the late Benjamin McIntire, where he read until of age, when he was admitted to the bar and practiced his profession until the time of his death.
In 1853 Mr. McIntire was nominated and elected District Attorney by the Democratic party. He rose rapidly in his profession, building up a large and lucrative practice, and soon became prominant in the councils of the Democracy in County and State. In recognition of his political services he was elected State Senator in 1867 in the double district composed of the counties of Perry, Blair, Huntingdon, Centre, Mifflin and Juniata, and while in the Senate displayed signal ability, easily rising to the foremost rank amongthe legislators of the upper House. At the experation of his term he resumed the practice of law, and was active in his profession and poitics until 1880, when he was stricken down with disease, and from that time confined to his house and within two years, except at short intervals, to his bed, when death relieved him.
Funeral services were held on Wednesday at one o'clock and the remains will be interred in Bloomfield Cemetery.
Mr. McIntire was a man of brilliant parts. Springing from Scottish ancestry, the characteristics of that race were dominant in his nature. In mental and physical qualities highly favored, his future in deed looked aupicious. His rapid rise in the legal profession and in the political arena presaged for him a long and honored career. In politics he was a pronounced Democrat andhis party numered not many more powerful exponents of his principals than he.
In his chosen profession he had few superiors. Noted alike for his legal acumen and forensic abilit, he was equilly effective with court and jury; thoroughly equipped, studious and untiring in his efforts in behalf of his clients, his services were engaged on one side or the other of all important cases. Besides a large general practice he had for many years been solicitor for the Pennsylvania Rail Raod, in this county.
He was an ardent member of the Masonic fraternity, and was a charter member of Adams Lodge, of this borough, which was constituted May 19th, 1858, he having been previously been a member of Perseverance Lodge #21, Harrisburg. For many years he was the District Deputy Grand Master of the 19th Masonic Distirct of Pennsylvania.
He was an ominivorous reader, and his private library, containing hundreds of rare legal works besides the best productions of ancient and modern writers, is known tobe one of the larges and most valuable in the State. Of scholarly attainments and gifted with a tencaious memory, in later years when enjoying a respite from pain, he found pleasure in translating the gems of Latin, Grecian and German authors.
Socially, those honored and respected him most who knew him best. He had a large aquaintance with prominent men through out the State, who admired him for his fine intellect and for his noble and generous heart. Although bowed down and wearied with the suffering of years, his mental faculties retained their wonted clearness to the last. His death while in the noon of life is regretted by all, and kindly memories of him will long be cherished. To mourning relatives and sorrowing friends we extend our heart felt sympathy.

Published in the Peoples Advocate & Press, March 18, 1886

In the Federal Census, 1870, I found in the census of New Bloomfield,
Benjamin McIntire (age72) Ann H. McIntire (age60) Charles T. McIntire, (age40) Benjamin W. McIntire (age24) Mary W. McIntire, (age30) and Clara McIntire (age25) So it seem tha Mr, McIntire never married.
Our community was startled on Sabath morning to heard of the death of Hon. C.J.T. McIntire, at his residence, in this place,(New Bloomfiled,) shortly after ten o'clock on Saturday night. Although his demise was not unexpected, and it was generally known that his symptoms some days previous had assumed an alarming nature, yet such wonderful vitality had been shown throughout his long illness, when many times the dread messenger had knocked at the portal, that it was thought he might possibly survive the attack; and while all hoped for the best the worst came.
The deceased was born in Bloomfield, January 3, 1830, and was consequently at the time of his death aged 56 years, 2 months, and 10 days. At the early age of thirteen years he entered Dickinson College, from which honored institution he graduated four years later, the youngest member of his class, with the highest honors his Alma Mater could bestow upon him for scholastic merit. The succeening year he spent at Marshall College, Mercersburg, where he devoted himself exclusively to the study of the German language.
At the termination of his German course at Mercersburg, he entered the law office of his father, the late Benjamin McIntire, where he read until of age, when he was admitted to the bar and practiced his profession until the time of his death.
In 1853 Mr. McIntire was nominated and elected District Attorney by the Democratic party. He rose rapidly in his profession, building up a large and lucrative practice, and soon became prominant in the councils of the Democracy in County and State. In recognition of his political services he was elected State Senator in 1867 in the double district composed of the counties of Perry, Blair, Huntingdon, Centre, Mifflin and Juniata, and while in the Senate displayed signal ability, easily rising to the foremost rank amongthe legislators of the upper House. At the experation of his term he resumed the practice of law, and was active in his profession and poitics until 1880, when he was stricken down with disease, and from that time confined to his house and within two years, except at short intervals, to his bed, when death relieved him.
Funeral services were held on Wednesday at one o'clock and the remains will be interred in Bloomfield Cemetery.
Mr. McIntire was a man of brilliant parts. Springing from Scottish ancestry, the characteristics of that race were dominant in his nature. In mental and physical qualities highly favored, his future in deed looked aupicious. His rapid rise in the legal profession and in the political arena presaged for him a long and honored career. In politics he was a pronounced Democrat andhis party numered not many more powerful exponents of his principals than he.
In his chosen profession he had few superiors. Noted alike for his legal acumen and forensic abilit, he was equilly effective with court and jury; thoroughly equipped, studious and untiring in his efforts in behalf of his clients, his services were engaged on one side or the other of all important cases. Besides a large general practice he had for many years been solicitor for the Pennsylvania Rail Raod, in this county.
He was an ardent member of the Masonic fraternity, and was a charter member of Adams Lodge, of this borough, which was constituted May 19th, 1858, he having been previously been a member of Perseverance Lodge #21, Harrisburg. For many years he was the District Deputy Grand Master of the 19th Masonic Distirct of Pennsylvania.
He was an ominivorous reader, and his private library, containing hundreds of rare legal works besides the best productions of ancient and modern writers, is known tobe one of the larges and most valuable in the State. Of scholarly attainments and gifted with a tencaious memory, in later years when enjoying a respite from pain, he found pleasure in translating the gems of Latin, Grecian and German authors.
Socially, those honored and respected him most who knew him best. He had a large aquaintance with prominent men through out the State, who admired him for his fine intellect and for his noble and generous heart. Although bowed down and wearied with the suffering of years, his mental faculties retained their wonted clearness to the last. His death while in the noon of life is regretted by all, and kindly memories of him will long be cherished. To mourning relatives and sorrowing friends we extend our heart felt sympathy.

Published in the Peoples Advocate & Press, March 18, 1886

In the Federal Census, 1870, I found in the census of New Bloomfield,
Benjamin McIntire (age72) Ann H. McIntire (age60) Charles T. McIntire, (age40) Benjamin W. McIntire (age24) Mary W. McIntire, (age30) and Clara McIntire (age25) So it seem tha Mr, McIntire never married.


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