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Capt Henry Augustus Sand

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Capt Henry Augustus Sand

Birth
Death
30 Oct 1862 (aged 25–26)
Burial
Brooklyn, Kings County, New York, USA Add to Map
Plot
Lot 319, Sec 42
Memorial ID
View Source
Captain, 103rd NY Infantry, Companies D and A; Private, 7th Regiment, New York State Militia, Company K. Born in New York City, Sand grew up in an affluent family and spent two years studying in Lausanne, Switzerland, when he was 18. After serving in Company K of the 7th Regiment in 1861, he re-enlisted as a Captain at New York City on 12 March 1862, and was commissioned into Company D of the 103rd New York that same day.On 17 Sep 1862, he was wounded at Antietam, MD, when the color bearer fell and he seized the flag planting it far ahead and urging the men to come forward. His thigh was shattered by a cannonball and he succumbed to his wounds on 30 October. The colonel of his regiment wrote a letter to his family after his death that read in part, "...With the battle of Antietam will live his name, an ornament to the Army and to his country and a just source of pride to his family, to his friends and to his regiment for whom he has labored and sacrificed in this righteous cause, his life and his blood."
Captain, 103rd NY Infantry, Companies D and A; Private, 7th Regiment, New York State Militia, Company K. Born in New York City, Sand grew up in an affluent family and spent two years studying in Lausanne, Switzerland, when he was 18. After serving in Company K of the 7th Regiment in 1861, he re-enlisted as a Captain at New York City on 12 March 1862, and was commissioned into Company D of the 103rd New York that same day.On 17 Sep 1862, he was wounded at Antietam, MD, when the color bearer fell and he seized the flag planting it far ahead and urging the men to come forward. His thigh was shattered by a cannonball and he succumbed to his wounds on 30 October. The colonel of his regiment wrote a letter to his family after his death that read in part, "...With the battle of Antietam will live his name, an ornament to the Army and to his country and a just source of pride to his family, to his friends and to his regiment for whom he has labored and sacrificed in this righteous cause, his life and his blood."

Inscription

He held aloft the Flag of Our Country



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