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Col Vincent Laurence “Moe” Boylan

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Col Vincent Laurence “Moe” Boylan

Birth
Brooklyn, Kings County (Brooklyn), New York, USA
Death
8 Mar 1983 (aged 69)
Honolulu, Honolulu County, Hawaii, USA
Burial
Cremated, Ashes scattered at sea. Specifically: Ashes scattered off Oahu, Hawaii.
Memorial ID
28412525 View Source

OBITUARY:

Vincent Laurence Boylan
Class of 1939
Died 8 March 1983 in Honolulu, Hawaii, aged 69 years
Interment: Cremated, Ashes scattered off coast of Oahu


VINCENT LAURENCE BOYLAN was born in Brooklyn, New York on 29 June 1913, the son of William and Eleanor Boylan. It was there he attended grammar school and high school.

When Moe was a youngster, he wanted to be a soldier. He also loved horses. These two desires did not leave him as he grew through his adolescent years. He left his birth place to enter West Point and took the final step to become a soldier. His second wish was fulfilled by being commissioned in the Cavalry. He took flying training, but lack of depth perception negated his qualifying for the Air Corps. Upon "washing out" of Randolph Field, he was stationed at Fort Clark, Texas, which seemed like a movie set to the native New Yorker that he was.

At Fort Clark, as a second lieutenant, he found that there was more to duty than riding a horse, but was able to find time to be with those animals he loved. At Clark, he met Abbie Robenson, daughter of John A. Robenson of the Class of 1910, whom he married in December of 1940.

The days of the horse soldiers were numbered and in 1942 Moe was transferred to Armor with assignment to Camp Polk, Louisiana. From the 83rd Reconnaissance Battalion of the 3rd Armored Division, he was cadred to the 87th Reconnaissance Battalion of the 7th Armored Division. He stayed with the 87th from its inception to its deactivation having assumed command of the unit almost a year before its commitment to combat in Europe. The 87th had a proud record and severe casualties. It was awarded the French Fourragere for its action in the defense of Metz. The greatest test was in fighting rear guard action at St. Vith, Belgium, during the Battle of the Bulge for which the battalion was decorated with the Belgian Fourragere.

Moe's decorations in World War II included two Silver Stars, and a Bronze Star medal in addition to the French Croix de Guerre. He was assigned to Camp Phillip Morris in France, a redeployment installation, before attending the second Command Course at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas and subsequent occupation duty in Germany with the United States Constabulary.

Upon return to the United States, he experienced an entirely new kind of soldiering as Public Relations Officer for Army Field Forces at Fort Monroe, Virginia, under General Mark W. Clark. Later came combat duty as G1 of the X Corps in Korea for which Moe received the Legion of Merit. A one year tour as Chief of Staff of the Southwestern Command in Japan preceded the answer to a tanker's desire, the command of a regiment at Fort Knox, Kentucky. That was followed by an interesting course at the Air War College at Maxwell Air Force base, Alabama, that afforded enough leisure to allow the pursuit of subtracting a few strokes from his golf score.

An introduction to Pentagon service began with duty with Army War Plans, then on a broader scale, assignment to the Joint Chief's Staff. The Pentagon pressure was relieved with a tour as head of the Reserve Officers Training Corps for Oahu High Schools and the University of Hawaii. Moe fell in love with the Islands, and it was predictable that he returned there for retirement after another assignment at the Pentagon as Deputy Chief of Army Reserves. He was awarded a second Legion of Merit in that capacity.

Moe was a fighting soldier in combat and a helpful friend to those with whom he served in quieter times. Upon retirement in Hawaii, he worked with the original Job Corps Youth Assistance Program. He later found fulfillment as a real estate broker feeling that the public was in need of assistance in that field. As he had hoped, he was successful in guiding buyers and sellers of property to their advantage. Moe was constantly an advocate of fair play.

Moe died unexpectedly at Tripler Army Medical Center in Hawaii on 8 March 1983. His ashes were scattered among flower leis off the coast of Oahu. His presence is missed and his memory cherished. "Be thou at Peace."

// Transcribed from the United States Military Academy Assembly Newsletter, September 1984. Survived by wife Abigail (Robenson) Boylan. No children. "Moe" was his nickname. //

OBITUARY:

Vincent Laurence Boylan
Class of 1939
Died 8 March 1983 in Honolulu, Hawaii, aged 69 years
Interment: Cremated, Ashes scattered off coast of Oahu


VINCENT LAURENCE BOYLAN was born in Brooklyn, New York on 29 June 1913, the son of William and Eleanor Boylan. It was there he attended grammar school and high school.

When Moe was a youngster, he wanted to be a soldier. He also loved horses. These two desires did not leave him as he grew through his adolescent years. He left his birth place to enter West Point and took the final step to become a soldier. His second wish was fulfilled by being commissioned in the Cavalry. He took flying training, but lack of depth perception negated his qualifying for the Air Corps. Upon "washing out" of Randolph Field, he was stationed at Fort Clark, Texas, which seemed like a movie set to the native New Yorker that he was.

At Fort Clark, as a second lieutenant, he found that there was more to duty than riding a horse, but was able to find time to be with those animals he loved. At Clark, he met Abbie Robenson, daughter of John A. Robenson of the Class of 1910, whom he married in December of 1940.

The days of the horse soldiers were numbered and in 1942 Moe was transferred to Armor with assignment to Camp Polk, Louisiana. From the 83rd Reconnaissance Battalion of the 3rd Armored Division, he was cadred to the 87th Reconnaissance Battalion of the 7th Armored Division. He stayed with the 87th from its inception to its deactivation having assumed command of the unit almost a year before its commitment to combat in Europe. The 87th had a proud record and severe casualties. It was awarded the French Fourragere for its action in the defense of Metz. The greatest test was in fighting rear guard action at St. Vith, Belgium, during the Battle of the Bulge for which the battalion was decorated with the Belgian Fourragere.

Moe's decorations in World War II included two Silver Stars, and a Bronze Star medal in addition to the French Croix de Guerre. He was assigned to Camp Phillip Morris in France, a redeployment installation, before attending the second Command Course at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas and subsequent occupation duty in Germany with the United States Constabulary.

Upon return to the United States, he experienced an entirely new kind of soldiering as Public Relations Officer for Army Field Forces at Fort Monroe, Virginia, under General Mark W. Clark. Later came combat duty as G1 of the X Corps in Korea for which Moe received the Legion of Merit. A one year tour as Chief of Staff of the Southwestern Command in Japan preceded the answer to a tanker's desire, the command of a regiment at Fort Knox, Kentucky. That was followed by an interesting course at the Air War College at Maxwell Air Force base, Alabama, that afforded enough leisure to allow the pursuit of subtracting a few strokes from his golf score.

An introduction to Pentagon service began with duty with Army War Plans, then on a broader scale, assignment to the Joint Chief's Staff. The Pentagon pressure was relieved with a tour as head of the Reserve Officers Training Corps for Oahu High Schools and the University of Hawaii. Moe fell in love with the Islands, and it was predictable that he returned there for retirement after another assignment at the Pentagon as Deputy Chief of Army Reserves. He was awarded a second Legion of Merit in that capacity.

Moe was a fighting soldier in combat and a helpful friend to those with whom he served in quieter times. Upon retirement in Hawaii, he worked with the original Job Corps Youth Assistance Program. He later found fulfillment as a real estate broker feeling that the public was in need of assistance in that field. As he had hoped, he was successful in guiding buyers and sellers of property to their advantage. Moe was constantly an advocate of fair play.

Moe died unexpectedly at Tripler Army Medical Center in Hawaii on 8 March 1983. His ashes were scattered among flower leis off the coast of Oahu. His presence is missed and his memory cherished. "Be thou at Peace."

// Transcribed from the United States Military Academy Assembly Newsletter, September 1984. Survived by wife Abigail (Robenson) Boylan. No children. "Moe" was his nickname. //


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