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2LT Harry James Foley

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2LT Harry James Foley Veteran

Birth
Kansas City, Wyandotte County, Kansas, USA
Death
15 Aug 1945 (aged 20)
Burial
Troy, Doniphan County, Kansas, USA Add to Map
Plot
NAW
Memorial ID
View Source
2Lt. Harry J. Foley, O-785267, was the Bombardier of the B-29 #44-69889, A-56. Assigned to the 20th AAF, 497th BG(VH), 871st BS. Stationed at Saipan Airfield, Northern Marianas.
They departed on 5 May 1945 on a precision bombing mission to the Hiro Naval Aircraft factory at Kure, Japan. Upon arrival at the target area they encountered heavy anti aircraft fire and enemy fighters.
According to eyewitness reports:
At 0110z at 35* 00'N-135* 45'E. B-29 A-56 lost #3 and #4 engines due to enemy fighter attack. Number 3 engine was on fire and both #3 and #4 were feathered. The aircraft maintained altitude and dropped its bombs but lost the formation.
B-29 A-55 (Lt. Evans and Crew) left the formation and followed A-56, picking the aircraft up at 33* 50'N-134* 00'E at 18000 feet. At this time both #3 and #4 engines were feathered and #3 was intermittently on fire. A-56 dropped down to 11,000 feet when a Tojo made three passes from from three and nine o'clock high before A-55 came to her help. Diving down A-55 tried to head the enemy aircraft off and maneuver in order to give all its turrets full play. The enemy aircraft was fired upon by all gunners up to 400 yards and left trailing smoke. It did not return.
At this time the right wing of A-56 broke off between the two feathered engines and the wing tank started to blaze. A-56 slid into the ground and blew up. The right gunner, left gunner and tail gunner of A-55 crew all saw this happen. The right gunner saw 4 (4) parachutes open at 2,000 feet (That was the maximum of which the gunner was certain). There is a possibility of eight (8) chutes. The crewmen were not seen hitting the ground, the ground was mountainous. There were no habitations nearby. The plane crashed in mountainous terrain at 34* 00' N, 135* 45' E.
MACR 14365 states it had 11 crew members. 4 were known to have been captured and imprisoned POW's. 7 Crew are listed as MIA/KIA.
2Lt. Harry J.Foley was captured by the Japanese after crashing on 5 May 1945. He and 3 other crew were sent to Sanadayama Military Camp where they were interrogated by the Kempeitai. It is unknown if they were sent to a POW Camp. According to Military War Crime records: "United States vs. Hiroshi Aujo, et al" on Pg. 64 it gives account of 15 August 1945. 2Lt. Foley and 4 other American Servicemen were executed by the Japanese. They were dumped in a common grave. In 1949 they were exhumed and reburied in the United States. 2Lt. Foley's body was identified by his brother and he was reburied in the United States. He was posthumously awarded the POW Medal, Air Medal and Purple Heart.
2Lt. Harry J. Foley, O-785267, was the Bombardier of the B-29 #44-69889, A-56. Assigned to the 20th AAF, 497th BG(VH), 871st BS. Stationed at Saipan Airfield, Northern Marianas.
They departed on 5 May 1945 on a precision bombing mission to the Hiro Naval Aircraft factory at Kure, Japan. Upon arrival at the target area they encountered heavy anti aircraft fire and enemy fighters.
According to eyewitness reports:
At 0110z at 35* 00'N-135* 45'E. B-29 A-56 lost #3 and #4 engines due to enemy fighter attack. Number 3 engine was on fire and both #3 and #4 were feathered. The aircraft maintained altitude and dropped its bombs but lost the formation.
B-29 A-55 (Lt. Evans and Crew) left the formation and followed A-56, picking the aircraft up at 33* 50'N-134* 00'E at 18000 feet. At this time both #3 and #4 engines were feathered and #3 was intermittently on fire. A-56 dropped down to 11,000 feet when a Tojo made three passes from from three and nine o'clock high before A-55 came to her help. Diving down A-55 tried to head the enemy aircraft off and maneuver in order to give all its turrets full play. The enemy aircraft was fired upon by all gunners up to 400 yards and left trailing smoke. It did not return.
At this time the right wing of A-56 broke off between the two feathered engines and the wing tank started to blaze. A-56 slid into the ground and blew up. The right gunner, left gunner and tail gunner of A-55 crew all saw this happen. The right gunner saw 4 (4) parachutes open at 2,000 feet (That was the maximum of which the gunner was certain). There is a possibility of eight (8) chutes. The crewmen were not seen hitting the ground, the ground was mountainous. There were no habitations nearby. The plane crashed in mountainous terrain at 34* 00' N, 135* 45' E.
MACR 14365 states it had 11 crew members. 4 were known to have been captured and imprisoned POW's. 7 Crew are listed as MIA/KIA.
2Lt. Harry J.Foley was captured by the Japanese after crashing on 5 May 1945. He and 3 other crew were sent to Sanadayama Military Camp where they were interrogated by the Kempeitai. It is unknown if they were sent to a POW Camp. According to Military War Crime records: "United States vs. Hiroshi Aujo, et al" on Pg. 64 it gives account of 15 August 1945. 2Lt. Foley and 4 other American Servicemen were executed by the Japanese. They were dumped in a common grave. In 1949 they were exhumed and reburied in the United States. 2Lt. Foley's body was identified by his brother and he was reburied in the United States. He was posthumously awarded the POW Medal, Air Medal and Purple Heart.

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2D LT 871 AAF BOMB SO
WORLD WAR II



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