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Jürgen Moltmann

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Jürgen Moltmann Famous memorial Veteran

Birth
Hamburg, Germany
Death
3 Jun 2024 (aged 98)
Tübingen, Landkreis Tübingen, Baden-Württemberg, Germany
Burial
Tübingen, Landkreis Tübingen, Baden-Württemberg, Germany Add to Map
Memorial ID
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Theologian, Author. One of the most well-known theologians of the post-World War II era, Jürgen Moltmann influenced a generation of students and theologians around the globe. His Theology of Hope helped to spawn the movement known as "Liberation Theology," and is reflected in the work of Latin American theologians and Black theologian James Cone. When several priests were martyred in El Salvador in 1979, Juan Ramon Moreno's blood-soaked copy of Moltmann's Crucifed God was found near them. Moltmann grew up in a secular home, with his parents raising him in a kind of progressive, socialist commune. They did send him to confirmation classes, and then also to the Hitler youth programs of the day. He was drafted into the German military during World War II at the age of 16, and was captured by the Allies when he surrendered in a forest during battle. During the following years as a prisoner of war, which extended through the post-war years, he was forced to come to terms with the awfulness for which his country had been fighting. He felt a despair of guilt for himself and humanity, and a chaplain gave him a New Testament. Reading the Gospel of Mark, he felt the power of Christ's suffering and identification with sinful humanity, and he became a committed Christian. His re-education that took place as a POW was continued upon his release and return to Germany. He eventually received a doctorate from the University of Göttingen, and was deeply influenced by the giant theologian of the day, Karl Barth. He became a theology professor at Wuppertal, then Bonn, and finally at Tübingen where he spent the bulk of his career. A Protestant, he was part of the German Evangelical Church and was ecumenical in his outlook. His theology was of the next generation of those earlier Barthian Neo-Orthodox theologians. He did not set out to write a thoroughgoing "system" of theology, but would rather say that he was content to make a "contribution" to theology. Moltmann wrote dozens of books and countless articles. A Broad Place is his autobiography, which also distills much of his thought through the years. He traveled the world lecturing, and was privileged to keep his clarity of thought well into his advanced age, garnering a following of younger theologians well into the 21st century. Moltmann was married to Elisabeth Moltmann-Wendell, a prominent theologian and author in her own right, and they often lectured and wrote together. His final book, Resurrected to Eternal Life: On Dying and Rising, was written after her death in 2016.

Theologian, Author. One of the most well-known theologians of the post-World War II era, Jürgen Moltmann influenced a generation of students and theologians around the globe. His Theology of Hope helped to spawn the movement known as "Liberation Theology," and is reflected in the work of Latin American theologians and Black theologian James Cone. When several priests were martyred in El Salvador in 1979, Juan Ramon Moreno's blood-soaked copy of Moltmann's Crucifed God was found near them. Moltmann grew up in a secular home, with his parents raising him in a kind of progressive, socialist commune. They did send him to confirmation classes, and then also to the Hitler youth programs of the day. He was drafted into the German military during World War II at the age of 16, and was captured by the Allies when he surrendered in a forest during battle. During the following years as a prisoner of war, which extended through the post-war years, he was forced to come to terms with the awfulness for which his country had been fighting. He felt a despair of guilt for himself and humanity, and a chaplain gave him a New Testament. Reading the Gospel of Mark, he felt the power of Christ's suffering and identification with sinful humanity, and he became a committed Christian. His re-education that took place as a POW was continued upon his release and return to Germany. He eventually received a doctorate from the University of Göttingen, and was deeply influenced by the giant theologian of the day, Karl Barth. He became a theology professor at Wuppertal, then Bonn, and finally at Tübingen where he spent the bulk of his career. A Protestant, he was part of the German Evangelical Church and was ecumenical in his outlook. His theology was of the next generation of those earlier Barthian Neo-Orthodox theologians. He did not set out to write a thoroughgoing "system" of theology, but would rather say that he was content to make a "contribution" to theology. Moltmann wrote dozens of books and countless articles. A Broad Place is his autobiography, which also distills much of his thought through the years. He traveled the world lecturing, and was privileged to keep his clarity of thought well into his advanced age, garnering a following of younger theologians well into the 21st century. Moltmann was married to Elisabeth Moltmann-Wendell, a prominent theologian and author in her own right, and they often lectured and wrote together. His final book, Resurrected to Eternal Life: On Dying and Rising, was written after her death in 2016.

Bio by: KDB


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  • Maintained by: Find a Grave
  • Originally Created by: KDB
  • Added: Jun 4, 2024
  • Find a Grave Memorial ID:
  • Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/271131230/j%C3%BCrgen-moltmann: accessed ), memorial page for Jürgen Moltmann (8 Apr 1926–3 Jun 2024), Find a Grave Memorial ID 271131230, citing Stadtfriedhof Tübingen, Tübingen, Landkreis Tübingen, Baden-Württemberg, Germany; Maintained by Find a Grave.