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Larry Allen

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Larry Allen Famous memorial

Original Name
Larry Christopher Allen Jr.
Birth
Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, California, USA
Death
2 Jun 2024 (aged 52)
Mexico
Burial
Burial Details Unknown Add to Map
Memorial ID
View Source
Pro Football Hall of Famer. He played 14 NFL seasons. He played college football for Butte College from 1989 to 1990 and, in 1992, after a year away from school, enrolled at Sonoma State University. In his two years with the Cossacks, Allen only gave up one sack. His stock dropped during the NFL draft due to his small school background. Allen was the tenth offensive lineman taken during the 1994 NFL draft and was the first-ever player chosen from Sonoma State University. He was selected with the 46th pick in the 2nd round of the NFL draft by the Dallas Cowboys and wore jersey number 73. In his first season, he was especially known for chasing down Saints linebacker Darian Conner after he intercepted the ball. Due to his size, announcers Al Michaels, Frank Gifford, and Dan Dierdorf talked more about Allen's feat than the actual interception. On September 4, 1995, Allen earned his first start against the New York Giants. He would go on to earn his first Pro Bowl. He would earn All-Pro and Pro Bowl honors for the next seven years in a row and would be selected to 10 Pro Bowls total while playing for the Dallas Cowboys. On January 28, 1996, the Dallas Cowboys defeated the Pittsburgh Steelers by a score of 27 to 17 in Super Bowl XXX. In 2006, during Pro Bowl weekend, he won the Strongest Man Award by bench pressing 43 reps of 225 pounds. On March 21, 2006, he was released by the Dallas Cowboys. Three days after being released, he was signed by the San Francisco 49ers as an unrestricted free agent. At this time, he changed his jersey number and began wearing number 71. He only started in 11 games during the season due to a sprained MCL but was voted to his 11th Pro Bowl after blocking for Frank Gore's franchise record 1,695 rushing yards in a season. Allen would go on to be selected to a total of 11 Pro Bowls, including his last as a 49er in 2006. He was also selected as an alternate for the 2007 season. Allen was selected as a member of the NFL's All-Decade Team for the 1990s and 2000s. He is widely recognized as one of the NFL's all-time best offensive linemen and is known for being one of the most powerful players to ever play the game. He was named All-Pro a total of seven times. Six times at guard from 1995 to 1997, from 1999 to 2001, and once at tackle in 1998. With his Pro Bowl selection at tackle in 1998, he became just the third player in league history to be selected to the Pro Bowl at more than one offensive line position during his career, joining Bruce Matthews of the Houston Oilers and Tennessee Titans (guard and center) and Chris Hinton of the Atlanta Falcons, Indianapolis Colts and Minnesota Vikings (guard and tackle). He played all but one position along the offensive line in his 11 seasons in Dallas, moving between right tackle in 1994, right guard from 1995 to 1997, left tackle from 1997 to 1998, and left guard from 1999 to 2003. During the half-time show of the Cowboys and Seahawks game on November 6, 2011, Allen, Drew Pearson, and Charles Haley were inducted into the prestigious Dallas Cowboys Ring of Honor. On February 2, 2013, Allen was voted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame. His son, Larry Allen Jr., played guard for the Harvard Crimson football team. He was later signed by the Dallas Cowboys in 2019 as an undrafted player. His nephew, Dakarai Allen, is a professional basketball player in the NBA G League.
Pro Football Hall of Famer. He played 14 NFL seasons. He played college football for Butte College from 1989 to 1990 and, in 1992, after a year away from school, enrolled at Sonoma State University. In his two years with the Cossacks, Allen only gave up one sack. His stock dropped during the NFL draft due to his small school background. Allen was the tenth offensive lineman taken during the 1994 NFL draft and was the first-ever player chosen from Sonoma State University. He was selected with the 46th pick in the 2nd round of the NFL draft by the Dallas Cowboys and wore jersey number 73. In his first season, he was especially known for chasing down Saints linebacker Darian Conner after he intercepted the ball. Due to his size, announcers Al Michaels, Frank Gifford, and Dan Dierdorf talked more about Allen's feat than the actual interception. On September 4, 1995, Allen earned his first start against the New York Giants. He would go on to earn his first Pro Bowl. He would earn All-Pro and Pro Bowl honors for the next seven years in a row and would be selected to 10 Pro Bowls total while playing for the Dallas Cowboys. On January 28, 1996, the Dallas Cowboys defeated the Pittsburgh Steelers by a score of 27 to 17 in Super Bowl XXX. In 2006, during Pro Bowl weekend, he won the Strongest Man Award by bench pressing 43 reps of 225 pounds. On March 21, 2006, he was released by the Dallas Cowboys. Three days after being released, he was signed by the San Francisco 49ers as an unrestricted free agent. At this time, he changed his jersey number and began wearing number 71. He only started in 11 games during the season due to a sprained MCL but was voted to his 11th Pro Bowl after blocking for Frank Gore's franchise record 1,695 rushing yards in a season. Allen would go on to be selected to a total of 11 Pro Bowls, including his last as a 49er in 2006. He was also selected as an alternate for the 2007 season. Allen was selected as a member of the NFL's All-Decade Team for the 1990s and 2000s. He is widely recognized as one of the NFL's all-time best offensive linemen and is known for being one of the most powerful players to ever play the game. He was named All-Pro a total of seven times. Six times at guard from 1995 to 1997, from 1999 to 2001, and once at tackle in 1998. With his Pro Bowl selection at tackle in 1998, he became just the third player in league history to be selected to the Pro Bowl at more than one offensive line position during his career, joining Bruce Matthews of the Houston Oilers and Tennessee Titans (guard and center) and Chris Hinton of the Atlanta Falcons, Indianapolis Colts and Minnesota Vikings (guard and tackle). He played all but one position along the offensive line in his 11 seasons in Dallas, moving between right tackle in 1994, right guard from 1995 to 1997, left tackle from 1997 to 1998, and left guard from 1999 to 2003. During the half-time show of the Cowboys and Seahawks game on November 6, 2011, Allen, Drew Pearson, and Charles Haley were inducted into the prestigious Dallas Cowboys Ring of Honor. On February 2, 2013, Allen was voted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame. His son, Larry Allen Jr., played guard for the Harvard Crimson football team. He was later signed by the Dallas Cowboys in 2019 as an undrafted player. His nephew, Dakarai Allen, is a professional basketball player in the NBA G League.

Bio by: Spencer


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  • Maintained by: Find a Grave
  • Originally Created by: Spencer
  • Added: Jun 3, 2024
  • Find a Grave Memorial ID:
  • Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/271055213/larry-allen: accessed ), memorial page for Larry Allen (27 Nov 1971–2 Jun 2024), Find a Grave Memorial ID 271055213; Burial Details Unknown; Maintained by Find a Grave.