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 William F “Bill” Gaines

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William F “Bill” Gaines

Birth
Sangamon County, Illinois, USA
Death
27 Apr 1913 (aged 72)
Blair, Washington County, Nebraska, USA
Burial
Kennard, Washington County, Nebraska, USA
Plot
Blk 5 Lt 12 Sp 1
Memorial ID
26385207 View Source

Pvt. William F. Gains (130th Illinois Infantry – Co B)

William F. Gains was born on October 24, 1840 and served 9 months during the middle of the Civil War. He was discharged on May 26, 1863 for disability. Some Civil War sources spell his last name as "Gaines".

Gains was a member of Post 52 (Blair) of the Grand Army of the Republic. He died on April 27, 1913.
Arlington Rev. Herold 1 May 1913

Above information provided by Dean Podoll.

Wm. F. Gaines died very suddenly last Sunday afternoon of heart failure. He had a slight attack on the previous Sunday and they thought it might be a return of his old trouble, gall stones, for which he was operated upon some six years ago. Friday night another attack seemed more like heart trouble, and on Saturday another attack came. He seemed better Sunday and had been sitting up in a chair. Mr. Sams helped him to bed and told him to go to sleep while he went downtown to get the mail. In a few seconds he leaned back, took a few short breaths and the end of a long life had come.
He was laid to rest in the Kennard Cemetery Wednesday afternoon where his daughter, Miss Mable, was buried a few years ago. Mr. Gaines was born in Sangamon County, Ill., Oct. 24, 1840, and was married to Miss Marietta Compton in 1867. In 1870 they came to the county, settling on a farm near Kennard, where they lived for many years. He then moved to Kennard and was postmaster for some time, later going into the implement business with Magnus Johnson. He moved to this city some two years ago, buying a home on west Lincoln Street, where he died. Besides the widow he leaves three sons, Newton W., of Valley; Elmer, of Scottsbluff, and Arthur, of Rankin, Okla. Also two daughters, Mrs. M. A. Sams, of this city, and Miss Orpha who lives at home. He leaves three brothers, Tom of Kennard, Henry, of Arlington, and Robert, of Pisgah, Ia. Also two half brothers, Oscar and Leonard, of Arlington, and a step-sister, Mrs. Phillip Crink, of Elk City. He served his country nobly in the Civil War and was a member of the local G.A.R. Post. In his passing Blair loses a good citizen, the Post an interesting and loyal comrade and the family a kind and loving husband and father. The bereaved family have the sympathy of all in their deep sorrow.
Blair Pilot

The Tribune, Wednesday, April 30, 1913

W. F. Gaines, a resident for many years of Washington county, and for the past few years living in Blair, died quite suddenly at his home Sunday afternoon of Cardeo-Vascular, or hardening of the arteries.

Mr. Gaines had not been in the best of health for a number of years, and was at one time operated upon for the removal of gall stones, but had been able to be about the house and had even worked in the garden late last week and his death was a surprise to the community.
Mr. Gaines was near seventy years of age and has a number of grown children, among whom are Miss Orphia Gaines and Mrs. M.A. Sams, of Blair.

Short funeral services were held at the home at 1:30 this afternoon and the body taken to Kennard, his former home, where the regular services were held in the Methodist church, Rev. Lang in charge. Burial was made in the family lot at Kennard.

# 2 - - Arlington Review Herald, Thursday, May 1, 1913
WASHINGTON CO. PIONEER DIES

Wm. F. Gaines died very suddenly last Sunday afternoon of heart failure. He had a slight attack on the previous Sunday and they thought it might be a return of his old trouble, gall stones, for which he was operated upon some six years ago. Friday night another attack seemed more like heart trouble and on Saturday another attack came. He seemed better Sunday and had been sitting up in a chair. Mr. Sams helped him to bed and told him to go to sleep while he went down town to get the mail. In a few seconds he leaned back, took a few short breaths and the end of a long life had come.

He was laid to rest in the Kennard cemetery Wednesday afternoon where his daughter, Miss Mabel, was buried a few years ago. Mr. Gaines was born in Sangamon county, Ill., Oct. 24, 1840, and was married to Miss Marietta Compton in 1867. In 1870 they came to this county, settling on a farm near Kennard, where they lived for many years. He then moved to Kennard and was postmaster for some time, later going into the implement business with Magnus Johnson. He moved to this city some two years ago, buying a home on west Lincoln street, where he died. Besides the widow he leaves three sons, Newton W., of Valley; Elmer of Scottsbluff; and Arthur of Rankin, Okla. Also two daughters, Mrs. M.A. Sams of this city; and Miss Orpha who lives at home. He leaves three brothers, Tom of Kennard; Henry of Arlington; and Robert of Pisgah, Ia. Also two half-brothers, Oscar and Leonard of Arlington; and a step-sister, Mrs. Phillip Crink of Elk City.
He served his country nobly in the civil war and was a member of the local G.A.R. Post. In his passing Blair loses a good citizen, the Post an interesting and loyal comrade and the family a kind and loving husband and father. The bereaved family have the sympathy of all in their deep sorrow.


# 3 - - Enterprise, Friday, May 2, 1913

W. F. GAINES DEAD

The sudden death of W.F. Gaines, which occurred at the family home in Blair last Sunday evening, was a surprise to those who had met him frequently on the streets in the down town district only a few days previously and a shock to his family and friends. The doctors gave the cause of his sudden taking off, as heart trouble.

“Bill” Gaines, as he was familiarly known amongst his intimate associates, was an active, public spirited man who made many friends and retained them during his active business life. He came to this county in 1870 and located on land just south of Kennard and engaged in farming pursuits, later moving to the village of Kennard where he served as postmaster, and afterwards engaged in the implement business in company with Magnus Johnson. Subsequently, he moved to Blair and engaged in the grocery business but disposed of his interests in the store after a time and retired to private life and lived there until his death.

He leaves his aged wife and five children, three sons, Newton of Valley; Elmer of Scottsbluff; and Arthur who lives in Oklahoma; and two daughters, Mrs. M.A. Sams and Miss Orpha, both living in Blair. Three brothers, Thomas of Kennard; Henry of Arlington; and Robert of Iowa; and one sister, Mrs. Blazier of Kennard.

Funeral services were held at the home in Blair, Rev. C.P. Lang officiating, and also at the church in Kennard where the remains were interred by the side of his daughter, Mabel, who died a few years since. Rev. Stansbury preached the funeral discourse.

Mr. Gaines was a veteran of the Civil war and a member of John A. Dix Post of the G.A.R. of Blair, many of the members of the Post following him to his lasting place.


~~~Obituaries courtesy of the Washington County Genealogical Society. Newspaper clippings on file in the Blair Public Library~~~



Pvt. William F. Gains (130th Illinois Infantry – Co B)

William F. Gains was born on October 24, 1840 and served 9 months during the middle of the Civil War. He was discharged on May 26, 1863 for disability. Some Civil War sources spell his last name as "Gaines".

Gains was a member of Post 52 (Blair) of the Grand Army of the Republic. He died on April 27, 1913.
Arlington Rev. Herold 1 May 1913

Above information provided by Dean Podoll.

Wm. F. Gaines died very suddenly last Sunday afternoon of heart failure. He had a slight attack on the previous Sunday and they thought it might be a return of his old trouble, gall stones, for which he was operated upon some six years ago. Friday night another attack seemed more like heart trouble, and on Saturday another attack came. He seemed better Sunday and had been sitting up in a chair. Mr. Sams helped him to bed and told him to go to sleep while he went downtown to get the mail. In a few seconds he leaned back, took a few short breaths and the end of a long life had come.
He was laid to rest in the Kennard Cemetery Wednesday afternoon where his daughter, Miss Mable, was buried a few years ago. Mr. Gaines was born in Sangamon County, Ill., Oct. 24, 1840, and was married to Miss Marietta Compton in 1867. In 1870 they came to the county, settling on a farm near Kennard, where they lived for many years. He then moved to Kennard and was postmaster for some time, later going into the implement business with Magnus Johnson. He moved to this city some two years ago, buying a home on west Lincoln Street, where he died. Besides the widow he leaves three sons, Newton W., of Valley; Elmer, of Scottsbluff, and Arthur, of Rankin, Okla. Also two daughters, Mrs. M. A. Sams, of this city, and Miss Orpha who lives at home. He leaves three brothers, Tom of Kennard, Henry, of Arlington, and Robert, of Pisgah, Ia. Also two half brothers, Oscar and Leonard, of Arlington, and a step-sister, Mrs. Phillip Crink, of Elk City. He served his country nobly in the Civil War and was a member of the local G.A.R. Post. In his passing Blair loses a good citizen, the Post an interesting and loyal comrade and the family a kind and loving husband and father. The bereaved family have the sympathy of all in their deep sorrow.
Blair Pilot

The Tribune, Wednesday, April 30, 1913

W. F. Gaines, a resident for many years of Washington county, and for the past few years living in Blair, died quite suddenly at his home Sunday afternoon of Cardeo-Vascular, or hardening of the arteries.

Mr. Gaines had not been in the best of health for a number of years, and was at one time operated upon for the removal of gall stones, but had been able to be about the house and had even worked in the garden late last week and his death was a surprise to the community.
Mr. Gaines was near seventy years of age and has a number of grown children, among whom are Miss Orphia Gaines and Mrs. M.A. Sams, of Blair.

Short funeral services were held at the home at 1:30 this afternoon and the body taken to Kennard, his former home, where the regular services were held in the Methodist church, Rev. Lang in charge. Burial was made in the family lot at Kennard.

# 2 - - Arlington Review Herald, Thursday, May 1, 1913
WASHINGTON CO. PIONEER DIES

Wm. F. Gaines died very suddenly last Sunday afternoon of heart failure. He had a slight attack on the previous Sunday and they thought it might be a return of his old trouble, gall stones, for which he was operated upon some six years ago. Friday night another attack seemed more like heart trouble and on Saturday another attack came. He seemed better Sunday and had been sitting up in a chair. Mr. Sams helped him to bed and told him to go to sleep while he went down town to get the mail. In a few seconds he leaned back, took a few short breaths and the end of a long life had come.

He was laid to rest in the Kennard cemetery Wednesday afternoon where his daughter, Miss Mabel, was buried a few years ago. Mr. Gaines was born in Sangamon county, Ill., Oct. 24, 1840, and was married to Miss Marietta Compton in 1867. In 1870 they came to this county, settling on a farm near Kennard, where they lived for many years. He then moved to Kennard and was postmaster for some time, later going into the implement business with Magnus Johnson. He moved to this city some two years ago, buying a home on west Lincoln street, where he died. Besides the widow he leaves three sons, Newton W., of Valley; Elmer of Scottsbluff; and Arthur of Rankin, Okla. Also two daughters, Mrs. M.A. Sams of this city; and Miss Orpha who lives at home. He leaves three brothers, Tom of Kennard; Henry of Arlington; and Robert of Pisgah, Ia. Also two half-brothers, Oscar and Leonard of Arlington; and a step-sister, Mrs. Phillip Crink of Elk City.
He served his country nobly in the civil war and was a member of the local G.A.R. Post. In his passing Blair loses a good citizen, the Post an interesting and loyal comrade and the family a kind and loving husband and father. The bereaved family have the sympathy of all in their deep sorrow.


# 3 - - Enterprise, Friday, May 2, 1913

W. F. GAINES DEAD

The sudden death of W.F. Gaines, which occurred at the family home in Blair last Sunday evening, was a surprise to those who had met him frequently on the streets in the down town district only a few days previously and a shock to his family and friends. The doctors gave the cause of his sudden taking off, as heart trouble.

“Bill” Gaines, as he was familiarly known amongst his intimate associates, was an active, public spirited man who made many friends and retained them during his active business life. He came to this county in 1870 and located on land just south of Kennard and engaged in farming pursuits, later moving to the village of Kennard where he served as postmaster, and afterwards engaged in the implement business in company with Magnus Johnson. Subsequently, he moved to Blair and engaged in the grocery business but disposed of his interests in the store after a time and retired to private life and lived there until his death.

He leaves his aged wife and five children, three sons, Newton of Valley; Elmer of Scottsbluff; and Arthur who lives in Oklahoma; and two daughters, Mrs. M.A. Sams and Miss Orpha, both living in Blair. Three brothers, Thomas of Kennard; Henry of Arlington; and Robert of Iowa; and one sister, Mrs. Blazier of Kennard.

Funeral services were held at the home in Blair, Rev. C.P. Lang officiating, and also at the church in Kennard where the remains were interred by the side of his daughter, Mabel, who died a few years since. Rev. Stansbury preached the funeral discourse.

Mr. Gaines was a veteran of the Civil war and a member of John A. Dix Post of the G.A.R. of Blair, many of the members of the Post following him to his lasting place.


~~~Obituaries courtesy of the Washington County Genealogical Society. Newspaper clippings on file in the Blair Public Library~~~




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