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William George Mann

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William George Mann

Birth
Ames, Story County, Iowa, USA
Death
5 Jan 1930 (aged 41)
Los Angeles County, California, USA
Burial
Seattle, King County, Washington, USA Add to Map
Plot
Oak Lake 1
Memorial ID
View Source

Professional Resume from Pacific Coast Architecture Database:


Principal, William G. Mann, Architect, Seattle, WA, 1916-1929. Mann's office in 1917-1918 was in Room #402 of the Boston Block in Pioneer Square, Seattle. (See R.L. Polk and Company's Seattle, Washington, City Directory, 1917, p. 1107 and R.L. Polk and Company's Seattle, Washington, City Directory, 1918, p. 1225.) When his own residence was completed in 1918, he moved his business office there.


Mann was put in charge of the More Home Bureau operated by the American Institute of Architects, Washington State Chapter, in 1917. The local Seattle newspaper, the University District Herald said in 10/1917: "Because of his experience in small house construction, and knowledge of Seattle realty values, architect William G. Mann, who resides at 6826 Sixteenth Avenue N.E., was selected by the architects of the Washington State Chapter of the American Institute of Architects to take charge of the architectural department of the More Homes Bureau. It is Mann's duty to advise the prospective builder as to the size and type of house to erect on his particular lot, after considering the location and value of the property, and estimating the combined borrowing value of the improved tract. Mr. Mann is well qualified for this branch of the work having had banking experience previous to taking up the study of architecture." (See "University District Home Builder Highly Honored," University District Herald, 10/04/1917, p. 2.) Mann apparently had had some experience working in a bank. This probably happened in Lake Benton, MN, where his father was a bank cashier.


Education: B.Arch., University of Pennsylvania (Penn), Philadelphia, PA. William G. Mann edited the Review of the Review of the School of Architecture, University of Pennsylvania in 1914, and served as a the Vice-President of the Penn Architectural Society in that year. (See the Review of the School of Architecture, University of Pennsylvania, 1914, n.p.)


Professional Resume from Pacific Coast Architecture Database:


Principal, William G. Mann, Architect, Seattle, WA, 1916-1929. Mann's office in 1917-1918 was in Room #402 of the Boston Block in Pioneer Square, Seattle. (See R.L. Polk and Company's Seattle, Washington, City Directory, 1917, p. 1107 and R.L. Polk and Company's Seattle, Washington, City Directory, 1918, p. 1225.) When his own residence was completed in 1918, he moved his business office there.


Mann was put in charge of the More Home Bureau operated by the American Institute of Architects, Washington State Chapter, in 1917. The local Seattle newspaper, the University District Herald said in 10/1917: "Because of his experience in small house construction, and knowledge of Seattle realty values, architect William G. Mann, who resides at 6826 Sixteenth Avenue N.E., was selected by the architects of the Washington State Chapter of the American Institute of Architects to take charge of the architectural department of the More Homes Bureau. It is Mann's duty to advise the prospective builder as to the size and type of house to erect on his particular lot, after considering the location and value of the property, and estimating the combined borrowing value of the improved tract. Mr. Mann is well qualified for this branch of the work having had banking experience previous to taking up the study of architecture." (See "University District Home Builder Highly Honored," University District Herald, 10/04/1917, p. 2.) Mann apparently had had some experience working in a bank. This probably happened in Lake Benton, MN, where his father was a bank cashier.


Education: B.Arch., University of Pennsylvania (Penn), Philadelphia, PA. William G. Mann edited the Review of the Review of the School of Architecture, University of Pennsylvania in 1914, and served as a the Vice-President of the Penn Architectural Society in that year. (See the Review of the School of Architecture, University of Pennsylvania, 1914, n.p.)


Gravesite Details

Section Oak Lake 1



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