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LTC John Taylor Coit

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LTC John Taylor Coit

Birth
Cheraw, Chesterfield County, South Carolina, USA
Death
2 Mar 1872 (aged 42)
Burial
Dallas, Collin County, Texas, USA
Memorial ID
26142782 View Source

The earliest marked grave in this cemetery is that of John Taylor Coit, a Princeton educated lawyer who moved to north Dallas from Cheraw, South Carolina in 1858. Originally buried on a bluff of the Trinity River, he was later reinterred in Frankford Cemetery where he is surrounded by other family members.

John Taylor Coit raised a company of Cavalry, which became Company E, 18th Texas Regiment under Colonel Nicholas Darnell and Lieutenant Colonel John Taylor Coit. Within a month of his son's birth, John Coit's regiment left Texas for Arkansas. He served with distinction there and (after having been captured at Arkansas Post and later exchanged) in 1863 in General Patrick Cleburn's Division, Army of Tennessee. He was wounded at the battle of Chickamauga and was in various hospitals until finally released and sent to San Antonio as a recruiting officer.

When he returned home, John Coit was in such poor health he was unable to farm. He leased his land and moved to Dallas, where he practiced law. He lived in a house he rented for twenty dollars per month from Maxim Guillot, on the corner of Elm and Jefferson.

(Also see: "Services to Honor 17 Confederates", The Dallas Morning News, May 21, 1961.)

The earliest marked grave in this cemetery is that of John Taylor Coit, a Princeton educated lawyer who moved to north Dallas from Cheraw, South Carolina in 1858. Originally buried on a bluff of the Trinity River, he was later reinterred in Frankford Cemetery where he is surrounded by other family members.

John Taylor Coit raised a company of Cavalry, which became Company E, 18th Texas Regiment under Colonel Nicholas Darnell and Lieutenant Colonel John Taylor Coit. Within a month of his son's birth, John Coit's regiment left Texas for Arkansas. He served with distinction there and (after having been captured at Arkansas Post and later exchanged) in 1863 in General Patrick Cleburn's Division, Army of Tennessee. He was wounded at the battle of Chickamauga and was in various hospitals until finally released and sent to San Antonio as a recruiting officer.

When he returned home, John Coit was in such poor health he was unable to farm. He leased his land and moved to Dallas, where he practiced law. He lived in a house he rented for twenty dollars per month from Maxim Guillot, on the corner of Elm and Jefferson.

(Also see: "Services to Honor 17 Confederates", The Dallas Morning News, May 21, 1961.)


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