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 George Iverson Goodwin

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George Iverson Goodwin

Birth
Americus, Sumter County, Georgia, USA
Death
1916 (aged 80–81)
Texas, USA
Burial
Brownwood, Brown County, Texas, USA
Memorial ID
25528849 View Source

(brownwood bulletin Aug 24, 1909)

Col. George I Goodwin was born in Americus, Georgia, on August 1st, 1835, and came with his father's family to Texas, landing at Galveston; Nov. 10th, 1846. His fatehr was a farmer and settled on the line of Grimes and Montgomery counties, where he was partly raised to manhood. In 1859 he was licensed to practice law at Richmond, Texas. On June 3rd, 1861, he enlisted in Company F. of Spaight's Battalion, composed of two companies of cavalry, his being a cavalry company. This company did service at Sabine Pass and part of them assisted in the capture of the vessels, Morning Light and Velocity, eleven miles out to sea. They also assisted the brave Dick Dowling in the capture of two large warships and in driving about twenty large transports with 10,000 Federal soldiers back to New Orleans. He was then assigned to Gen. Tom Green's brigade and assisted in the capture of about 2,000 Federal soldiers who were guarding the supplies of Gen. Banks, valued at $1,000,000. In 1864 he was transferred to Ragsdale's cavalry and was promoted. This cavalry was consolidated with Gould's battalion on account of depletion, and the two remained together to the close of the war. In April, 1865, he went with the command to Hempstead and on May 26th reported to Gen. Magruder, commanding the department of Texas for duty. The General gave him an honorable discharge and his war days were over. The following November he settled at Bryan and practiced law there for ten years, coming to Brownwood November 13, 1875, where he practiced law for about twenty years, since which time he has only looked after his private affairs.
He has lived in Texas under three governments, the Republic, the Confederate and the United States and twice an alien, as a citizen of the Confederate States and the Republic of Texas.
He has been a staunch democrat always and while lhe has held office he has never sought a public position, believing in the old doctrine that the office should seek the man.
He is a consistent Christian gentleman and a member of the Baptist Church, a man whom the state and whom friends everywhere have always delighted to honor.

(brownwood bulletin Aug 24, 1909)

Col. George I Goodwin was born in Americus, Georgia, on August 1st, 1835, and came with his father's family to Texas, landing at Galveston; Nov. 10th, 1846. His fatehr was a farmer and settled on the line of Grimes and Montgomery counties, where he was partly raised to manhood. In 1859 he was licensed to practice law at Richmond, Texas. On June 3rd, 1861, he enlisted in Company F. of Spaight's Battalion, composed of two companies of cavalry, his being a cavalry company. This company did service at Sabine Pass and part of them assisted in the capture of the vessels, Morning Light and Velocity, eleven miles out to sea. They also assisted the brave Dick Dowling in the capture of two large warships and in driving about twenty large transports with 10,000 Federal soldiers back to New Orleans. He was then assigned to Gen. Tom Green's brigade and assisted in the capture of about 2,000 Federal soldiers who were guarding the supplies of Gen. Banks, valued at $1,000,000. In 1864 he was transferred to Ragsdale's cavalry and was promoted. This cavalry was consolidated with Gould's battalion on account of depletion, and the two remained together to the close of the war. In April, 1865, he went with the command to Hempstead and on May 26th reported to Gen. Magruder, commanding the department of Texas for duty. The General gave him an honorable discharge and his war days were over. The following November he settled at Bryan and practiced law there for ten years, coming to Brownwood November 13, 1875, where he practiced law for about twenty years, since which time he has only looked after his private affairs.
He has lived in Texas under three governments, the Republic, the Confederate and the United States and twice an alien, as a citizen of the Confederate States and the Republic of Texas.
He has been a staunch democrat always and while lhe has held office he has never sought a public position, believing in the old doctrine that the office should seek the man.
He is a consistent Christian gentleman and a member of the Baptist Church, a man whom the state and whom friends everywhere have always delighted to honor.

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