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Lionel Melville Wolffsohn / Woolson

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Lionel Melville Wolffsohn / Woolson Veteran

Birth
Los Angeles County, California, USA
Death
23 Apr 1930 (aged 41)
Attica, Wyoming County, New York, USA
Burial
Cremated. Specifically: Ashes were scattered by plan over the site of the Packard Proving Grounds in Shelby Township, Michigan. Add to Map
Memorial ID
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Packard developed the first diesel engine for airplanes here in 1929. Captain Lionel Woolson, a test pilot for Packard, was killed in a plane crash near Attica, New York, and mourners scattered his ashes over the Proving Grounds.
[From the Packard Inner Circle, Detroit Mich., April 26, 1930]
CAPTAIN WOOLSON contributed more to the safety of aviation than any other person in his generation. The accident in which he met his death was in no sense the fault of his creation. He encountered something that no one yet has found a means of overcoming, namely, a snow or sleet storm. He died in the midst of one of these which deprived him of his ability to see.
In no manner was the accident a reflection on his work, a work that will go on. Captain Woolson was one of the great men of recent history. He was daring but only in the best sense, for he was far from reckless. His death occurred in what he considered the performance of his duty, the delivery of one of the engines which he had created. I considered Captain Woolson as one of the great mechanical geniuses of this generation. He carefully calculated everything necessary out of his ideas on paper and then working them into being in wood and metals. He died with the knowledge that he had finished what he had started out to accomplish, the development of an oil-burning airplane engine with all of the many features of safety flying which such a motor inherently possesses.
Packard developed the first diesel engine for airplanes here in 1929. Captain Lionel Woolson, a test pilot for Packard, was killed in a plane crash near Attica, New York, and mourners scattered his ashes over the Proving Grounds.
[From the Packard Inner Circle, Detroit Mich., April 26, 1930]
CAPTAIN WOOLSON contributed more to the safety of aviation than any other person in his generation. The accident in which he met his death was in no sense the fault of his creation. He encountered something that no one yet has found a means of overcoming, namely, a snow or sleet storm. He died in the midst of one of these which deprived him of his ability to see.
In no manner was the accident a reflection on his work, a work that will go on. Captain Woolson was one of the great men of recent history. He was daring but only in the best sense, for he was far from reckless. His death occurred in what he considered the performance of his duty, the delivery of one of the engines which he had created. I considered Captain Woolson as one of the great mechanical geniuses of this generation. He carefully calculated everything necessary out of his ideas on paper and then working them into being in wood and metals. He died with the knowledge that he had finished what he had started out to accomplish, the development of an oil-burning airplane engine with all of the many features of safety flying which such a motor inherently possesses.

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