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Pvt Wilford Heath Hudson

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Pvt Wilford Heath Hudson Veteran

Birth
Corydon, Harrison County, Indiana, USA
Death
9 Sep 1905 (aged 86)
Grantsville, Tooele County, Utah, USA
Burial
Grantsville, Tooele County, Utah, USA GPS-Latitude: 40.6007674, Longitude: -112.4765539
Plot
Blk K Sec 3 L-1 SP 1W
Memorial ID
View Source
Son of Robert Hudson & Damaris Lemmon

WILFORD HEATH HUDSON
Mormon Battalion Veteran

Wilford Heath Hudson was born 19 September 1818, at Corydove, Harrison County, Indiana. He died 6 September 1905, at Grantsville, Tooele County, Utah.

Wilford married Juliana Graybill in Nauvoo, Hancock County, Illinois, on 29 November 1842. Wilford and Juliana had four daughters, two of whom were born in Nauvoo.

He married Mary Ann Graybill, Juliana's sister, as a plural wife, sometime after September, 1849. Wilford and Mary Ann had 12 children, four daughters and eight sons. He married a third plural wife, Elizabeth Jane Brandon. Wilford and Jane had two children, a daughter and a son.

Wilford was baptized into the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, in Adams County, Illinois, 10 December 1842 (or 1840) by David Evans. Wilford was in the 29th Quorum of 70s, ordained by Henry Newman in October 1845.

Wilford was a man of great strength and large stature. He was six feet two inches tall, weighed 205 pounds, with blue eyes and curly auburn hair.

Although we do not know when Wilford and Juliana left Nauvoo we know they assisted in locating at Mt. Pisgah. While they were camped at Mt. Pisgah, Wilford was called to volunteer for the Mormon Battalion.

As a soldier in the Mormon Battalion, Wilford would participate in the longest infantry march in history, over 2000 miles. Wilford was Private #47, Company A, wainwright. As wainwright, Wilford was responsible for repairing and rebuilding wagons.

While stationed at Fort Moore in Los Angeles, he participated in constructing the flagpole and raising the American flag for the first time ever in Los Angeles. He severely injured his right knee while in Los Angeles.

Wilford was working at Sutter's flour mill, in January 1848, when gold was was discovered at Sutter's sawmill. Wilford traveled to the sawmill, with Sidney S. Willis and Ephraim Green. They received permission to prospect in the tail race where Wilford dug out a gold nugget with his pocket knife.

Returning to work at the flour mill, Wilford and Sidney followed the American river. Stopping at a sand bar subsequently known as Mormon Island, they found a few particles of gold.

Since they found such a small amount of gold, they didn't intend to return there. However, some of their Battalion buddies at the flour mill were intrigued by the story of the gold "strike" and convinced Wilford and Sidney to take them there. They did; Mormon Island proved to be one of the richest gold fields in California.


If Wilford had been an opportunist, he would have stayed in California. Instead, faithful to his religion and his family, he made preparations to start for the Salt Lake Valley when the church called.

Wilford and some of the other Battalion Boys went to Pleasant Valley and waited for the snow to melt enough that they could travel over the Sierra Mountains. On 25 June, 1848, three men, Browett, Cox and Allen, left to scout a route from Pleasant Valley. They did not return.

On 3 July, a general move was made to start. On 5 July, a party of ten men searched unsuccessfully for ten days to find the missing men.

About 18 July, the Battalion Boys met Indians dressed in some of the clothing belonging to the lost men. On 19 July, the decomposed bodies of the three missing brethren were found. The company named the spot Tragedy Springs.

Wilford cut a blaze on a nearby fir tree and carved the inscription, "To the Memory of Daniel Browett, Ezrah H. Allen and Henderson Cox, who are supposed to have Been Murdered and Buried by Indians On the Night of the 27th of June 1848.

When the tree fell, the blaze was cut out and saved; it is now preserved at the Marshall Gold Discovery Historic Park at Coloma. Wilford also found a pouch of gold dust that belonged to Ezrah Allen, his close friend. Wilford returned the pouch to Ezrah's widow at Council Bluffs.

Wilford came to the Salt Lake Valley in Ephraim Green's Company of Ten, which was part of the Captain of Fifty commanded by Samuel Thompson. This group was later known as the Holmes-Thompson Company and were the first to open the wagon trail known as the Salt Lake Cutoff.

Wilford entered Great Salt Lake City on 28 September 1848. He went to Council Bluffs to get his family and they came to the Salt Lake Valley in 1849. Juliana died in May 1851.

In 1852, Wilford, Mary Ann and their children were called by the Church to help build up Grantsville, Utah. Wilford held many positions there, both in the town and church. He was Captain in charge of the Grantsville Nauvoo Legion. This troop of 35 men were called to help defend Echo Canyon during the Utah War of 1858.

Wilford was called, with two other men to settle Ibapah, on the Utah-Nevada border. In 1859, they started a farm and settlement there to help the Indians to learn to farm independently. Wilford also helped build the Overland Mail and Stage station there. In June of 1860, he was forced to abandon the settlement at Ibapah because of Indian hostilities.

Wilford died at Grantsville in 1905 at age 87. As one of the early settlers in Tooele County, he helped develop both the land and the community. He remained true and active to his church. His aid and influence were always on the side of progress and improvement. His death was an occasion of widespread regret.

Son of Robert Hudson & Damaris Lemmon

WILFORD HEATH HUDSON
Mormon Battalion Veteran

Wilford Heath Hudson was born 19 September 1818, at Corydove, Harrison County, Indiana. He died 6 September 1905, at Grantsville, Tooele County, Utah.

Wilford married Juliana Graybill in Nauvoo, Hancock County, Illinois, on 29 November 1842. Wilford and Juliana had four daughters, two of whom were born in Nauvoo.

He married Mary Ann Graybill, Juliana's sister, as a plural wife, sometime after September, 1849. Wilford and Mary Ann had 12 children, four daughters and eight sons. He married a third plural wife, Elizabeth Jane Brandon. Wilford and Jane had two children, a daughter and a son.

Wilford was baptized into the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, in Adams County, Illinois, 10 December 1842 (or 1840) by David Evans. Wilford was in the 29th Quorum of 70s, ordained by Henry Newman in October 1845.

Wilford was a man of great strength and large stature. He was six feet two inches tall, weighed 205 pounds, with blue eyes and curly auburn hair.

Although we do not know when Wilford and Juliana left Nauvoo we know they assisted in locating at Mt. Pisgah. While they were camped at Mt. Pisgah, Wilford was called to volunteer for the Mormon Battalion.

As a soldier in the Mormon Battalion, Wilford would participate in the longest infantry march in history, over 2000 miles. Wilford was Private #47, Company A, wainwright. As wainwright, Wilford was responsible for repairing and rebuilding wagons.

While stationed at Fort Moore in Los Angeles, he participated in constructing the flagpole and raising the American flag for the first time ever in Los Angeles. He severely injured his right knee while in Los Angeles.

Wilford was working at Sutter's flour mill, in January 1848, when gold was was discovered at Sutter's sawmill. Wilford traveled to the sawmill, with Sidney S. Willis and Ephraim Green. They received permission to prospect in the tail race where Wilford dug out a gold nugget with his pocket knife.

Returning to work at the flour mill, Wilford and Sidney followed the American river. Stopping at a sand bar subsequently known as Mormon Island, they found a few particles of gold.

Since they found such a small amount of gold, they didn't intend to return there. However, some of their Battalion buddies at the flour mill were intrigued by the story of the gold "strike" and convinced Wilford and Sidney to take them there. They did; Mormon Island proved to be one of the richest gold fields in California.


If Wilford had been an opportunist, he would have stayed in California. Instead, faithful to his religion and his family, he made preparations to start for the Salt Lake Valley when the church called.

Wilford and some of the other Battalion Boys went to Pleasant Valley and waited for the snow to melt enough that they could travel over the Sierra Mountains. On 25 June, 1848, three men, Browett, Cox and Allen, left to scout a route from Pleasant Valley. They did not return.

On 3 July, a general move was made to start. On 5 July, a party of ten men searched unsuccessfully for ten days to find the missing men.

About 18 July, the Battalion Boys met Indians dressed in some of the clothing belonging to the lost men. On 19 July, the decomposed bodies of the three missing brethren were found. The company named the spot Tragedy Springs.

Wilford cut a blaze on a nearby fir tree and carved the inscription, "To the Memory of Daniel Browett, Ezrah H. Allen and Henderson Cox, who are supposed to have Been Murdered and Buried by Indians On the Night of the 27th of June 1848.

When the tree fell, the blaze was cut out and saved; it is now preserved at the Marshall Gold Discovery Historic Park at Coloma. Wilford also found a pouch of gold dust that belonged to Ezrah Allen, his close friend. Wilford returned the pouch to Ezrah's widow at Council Bluffs.

Wilford came to the Salt Lake Valley in Ephraim Green's Company of Ten, which was part of the Captain of Fifty commanded by Samuel Thompson. This group was later known as the Holmes-Thompson Company and were the first to open the wagon trail known as the Salt Lake Cutoff.

Wilford entered Great Salt Lake City on 28 September 1848. He went to Council Bluffs to get his family and they came to the Salt Lake Valley in 1849. Juliana died in May 1851.

In 1852, Wilford, Mary Ann and their children were called by the Church to help build up Grantsville, Utah. Wilford held many positions there, both in the town and church. He was Captain in charge of the Grantsville Nauvoo Legion. This troop of 35 men were called to help defend Echo Canyon during the Utah War of 1858.

Wilford was called, with two other men to settle Ibapah, on the Utah-Nevada border. In 1859, they started a farm and settlement there to help the Indians to learn to farm independently. Wilford also helped build the Overland Mail and Stage station there. In June of 1860, he was forced to abandon the settlement at Ibapah because of Indian hostilities.

Wilford died at Grantsville in 1905 at age 87. As one of the early settlers in Tooele County, he helped develop both the land and the community. He remained true and active to his church. His aid and influence were always on the side of progress and improvement. His death was an occasion of widespread regret.



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