Aaron Abbott

Aaron Abbott

Birth
Ohio, USA
Death 11 Mar 1863 (aged 39–40)
Forsyth, Taney County, Missouri, USA
Burial Springfield, Greene County, Missouri, USA
Plot 16, 0, 914
Military ,
Memorial ID 250733 · View Source
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Born and raised on a farm in Miami County, Ohio, Aaron Abbott married Elizabeth (Collins) Abbott in Miami County, Ohio on April 4, 1844. After their oldest son Jacob W. (Willis) was born, they moved to Granville, Delaware County, Indiana where Lydia, Clark, Sarah and James were born. Around 1856 they moved to Washington County, Iowa where Martha, Mary and John were born. Aaron bought land and farmed in Marion Township, where they lived until the Civil War began. He enlisted in "C" Company of the 19th Regiment of the Iowa Infantry Volunteers on August 20, 1862 and later contracted typhoid fever, dying at Forsyth, Missouri. His son Willis was also a member of the same regiment, serving 3 years. Aaron's wife, Elizabeth died in 1883, at the home of their son John, in Merrick County, Nebraska, being at the time of her death 58 years old. Aaron and his wife were devoted members of the Christian church.
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From his Civil War diary (1862):
We started home September 1, arrived at Koekuk September 3. Company started from quarters and got aboard the T.L. Magill bound for St. Louis, September 4.
5th. Reached St. Louis about 10 A.M.
11th. Came down to get aboard the cars about 10 A.M. bound for Rolla. Arrived at Rolla about 10 P.M.
13th. Came out on road to Springfield about six miles and encamped.
16th. Started for Springfield. Came about 10 miles and encamped.
17th. Came 10 miles.
18th. Came 12 miles
19th. Came 16 miles.
20th. Came 20 miles.
21st. Sunday. Came 22 miles. Largest day's travel.
22nd. Came 18 miles. Company C and Company N advanced guards. Our Captain joined us again on the 22nd.
24th. Came through Springfield and camped about one mile northwest of the town.
Oct. 11th Commenced our march to Capeville. Came 14 miles.
12th. Sunday. Came 18 miles.
14th. Came 10 miles. Stayed in camp at Capeville until the 17th, then marched 4 miles and encamped.
18th. Marched 26 miles to Sugar Creek. The firing of the pickets caused a false alarm about 11 o'clock at night.
20th. Started at dark on a forced march. We marched all night.
21st. Stopped one hour at break of day. Marched all day. Cooked a little and then crossed the creek.
22nd. Marched all day with scarcely a thing to eat. Stopped at night had about one hour and one-half to cook. We marched on until 3 o'clock in the morning.
23rd. Marched to Crop Hollows and went into camp.
Nov. 4th. Started the march north at 10 o'clock. Camped near Elkhorn Tavern. Marched 16 miles.
5th. Started at 6 A.M. and marched 20 miles. Camped 4 miles south of Capeville.
6th. Marched to Cranecreek a distance of 30 or 35 miles and encamped.
10th Marched northeast 18 miles and encamped at James River.
11th. Marched 12 miles to Ozarks.
14th. Started from camp and marched northeast 18 miles to Oak Springs.
17th. Started on march about noon and marched all evening and until 10 o'clock at night, 17 miles.
18th. Marched 9 miles to James River. A good many of the teams didn't get in until the next day.
22nd. Came to Lion Springs about 5 miles.
28th. The Batallion was marched out to Wilson Creek Battle Ground, December 3 to reinforce Blunt at noon. Marched to Cranecreek 18 miles. Got to camp about 9 or 10 o'clock.
Dec. 4th. Started at 4 A.M. marched to Capeville, a distance of 27 miles.
5th. Started at 5 A.M. marched past Elkhorn, 26 miles in all.
6th. Started at 6 A.M. Came on 20 miles and stopped at dusk and got supper and then marched on to Fayetteville, a distance of nine miles.
7th. Came on 12 miles to Illinois Creek, then followed the Battle of Prairie Grove between the Rebeland Hindsman and General Warren Blunt.
10th. Started eastward at 10 A.M. Seven paroled rebels were taken and shot by order of the General. Marched 13 miles.
11th. Commenced the march at half past 6. Came 11 miles and encamped.
12th. Started at half past nine and came to Carrollton 8 miles and encamped.
13th. Nine of the company went out to the top of the peak, 3 miles.
15th. Snow fell three inches in depth.
17th. Started from there at about 3 P.M. Lay on rails all night.
18th. Came 18 miles and encamped among the pines.
19th Commenced to march at 8 A.M. Came 13 to White River.
20th. Crossed the River. Camped about one-half mile east of Forsyth.
Feb. 13th. Willis (son) was detailed for teamster on G.D. Collin's train.
17th. Our regiment came down to town by companies.
25th. A scout, first Iowa Company came to us.
26th. Sent 40$ to Springfield by Charley Lewis to express home and likeness to put in a case and $2.00 to pay for it.
28th. Mustered for pay.
Mar. 7th. Sunday. Washed my clothes. Boat went down the river two miles, struck the bank, broke in tow. Billy McDowell was one it. Several drowned. Two mule teams drowned.
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Letter sent by a fellow soldier informing his widow, Elisabeth, of Aaron's passing (dated Thursday, March 12, 1863). The original is on display at George Washington Inn near Port Angeles, Washington.
Mrs. Abbott:
With a sad and heavy heart I find it my duty to impart to your intelligence the most painful. Gladly would we spare you the grief and affliction if it were possible. I should like to break it gradually but the truth must come. Suspense and apprehension are as painful as the truth at once. "What the Lord giveth, the Lord taketh away." Your husband is sleeping the sleep that knows no waking. He died yesterday evening with the setting sun. Eight or ten days ago he complained of a dullness and had no appetite. It hung on that way for several days when he took a dose of blue medicine which the doctor afterwards said was the best thing he could have done. He still kept getting worse, when we had the doctor call in and see him he pronounced the disease as typhoid fever. Last Sunday, was the first time that he kept his bed, then he rose up part of the time. We made him a good bed. I stayed up with him all night Sunday night bathing his feet in warm water several times washed his hands and face and rubbed them. I gave him all the assistance in my power. He rested easier in the morning which released us of much anxiety but all in vain. He grew worse again, our bright hopes were doomed to disappointment. He was carefully watched and attended on Monday night. By that time he had lost the use of his tongue and speech to such an extent that it was almost impossible to understand a word he said. We got his consent on Tuesday morning to move him to the hospital. We made him a good soft bed and carried him there. The Doctors were very attentive and seemed to exert themselves to the utmost to bring him under the influence of medicine. Previous to Tuesday he was rather restless but from that one he was quiet. We all noticed a change in his countenance. There had a pleasant smile settled on his face which the doctor said was a poor sign of his recovering. Shafer and I sat by his cot all night Tuesday night, he didn't seem to suffer much. He would frequently raise his arm and point with his finger upward. "Home" was the only word we could understand him to say. That night, one time he reached his hand to me and I took it in mine. He looked me in the eyes steadily and smiling pleasantly he tried to tell me something but could not. There was no sorrow to be traced in that smile but on the contrary, peace and contentment. His tongue spoke nothing but his face and eyes spoke volumes of happiness. We felt that his departure to a better world was close at hand. Towards morning he fell into a sound sleep. We hoped he would recover his speech when he awoke but the Almighty willed it otherwise. Shafer and Willis were excused from duty with him. The rest of us were all sent out to work. Willis was allowed to stay with his Dad all the time. At night we generally got him persuaded to go to bed and rest. As soon as I was dismissed in the evening I hurried to the hospital. The others working at a different place were already there, the sorrow depicted on their faces. The silent tears trickling down their cheeks told too plainly that we were losing a friend that was very dear to us. He died without a struggle, there was no mark of pain, but as one going to sleep with that calm and placid smile still resting on his face. His death brought to my memory forceably, "Oh, death where is thy sting and grave they boasted victory." Why mourn the departed who leave a world of trouble for one of continued sunshine and love. When we have the privilege of one day joining them in their purity. With sorrowful hearts we attended to the duties due the dead. We dressed him in full uniform and carried him carefully to our own room and watched over his body all night. There was a gloom in our Company that will not soon be removed. He was esteemed as a soldier, respected as a man and loved as a Christian through the entire Company, he had not an enemy in it. Soldiers have for each other a friendship they were strangers to at home. Rest assured your husband got every attention in our power to give. At two o'clock today we laid his remains in a quiet lovely spot near the river bank. He was buried with the honors of war, there was a large attendance. Hearts that were brave and daring on the battle field gave vent to their feelings in tears. He was laid in a good coffin. We placed a board at his head with his name, Company and regiment inscribed on it. We intend to set a large cedar post in its place as soon as we have time. He was a beautiful corpse. Willis is well. Willis is left without a father but not without friends. He shall not want anything while in the army as long as the rest of us have anything. He bears up under his trouble better than I expected. Write to him when you get this. It always done him so much good to ready our letters. There was a letter came yesterday evening from you. I thought perhaps that you had none of Aarons hair and send in this a lock of it. I believe that I gave an account of everything concerning your husband's sickness and death. So I will close hoping you will put your trust in the Lord for He alone can comfort you in your affliction.
Yours truly,
Levi B. Cocklin
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More historical info on his service with the Nineteenth Regiment, Iowa Volunteer Infantry: http://archive.org/stream/historyofninetee00dung#page/n39/mode/2up


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Parents
Gravesite Details Per Civil War Pension Records at the National Archives the correct date of death is March 11, 1863 (tombstone is incorrect)
  • Maintained by: Daniel Abbott
  • Originally Created by: US Veterans Affairs Office
  • Added: 25 Feb 2000
  • Find a Grave Memorial 250733
  • Daniel Abbott
  • Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed ), memorial page for Aaron Abbott (1823–11 Mar 1863), Find a Grave Memorial no. 250733, citing Springfield National Cemetery, Springfield, Greene County, Missouri, USA ; Maintained by Daniel Abbott (contributor 47369730) .