Lady Ottoline Violet Anne <I>Cavendish-Bentinck</I> Morrell

Lady Ottoline Violet Anne Cavendish-Bentinck Morrell

Birth
London, City of London, Greater London, England
Death
21 Apr 1938 (aged 64)
Royal Tunbridge Wells, Tunbridge Wells Borough, Kent, England
Burial
Holbeck, Bassetlaw District, Nottinghamshire, England
Memorial ID
24842624 View Source

English hostess and patron of the arts who brought together some of the most important writers and artists of her day. She was the inspiration for Mrs Bidlake in Aldous Huxley's Point Counter Point, for Hermione Roddice in D. H. Lawrence's Women in Love, for Lady Caroline Bury in Graham Greene's It's a Battlefield, and for Lady Sybilline Quarrell in Alan Bennett's Forty Years On. She became "Lady" when her half-brother William succeeded to the Dukedom of Portland in 1879. Her best-known relative was her cousin Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon, later to become Queen to George VI. Ottoline married Liberal politician, Philip Morrell, in 1902, with whom she shared many views and interests, including an open marriage: both she and her husband had affairs and relationships with other people, while supporting and sticking with each other. The Morrells had one daughter, Julian. Ottoline was involved with, among others, philosopher Bertrand Russell, painter Augustus John, artist Dora Carrington, novelist Dorothy Bussy, and artist Roger Fry. She also became good friends with writer Virginia Woolf. She held a manor east of Oxford at Garsington, which became a well-known literary and political salon. She maintained the strong religiosity of her youth, doing good works and caring for a great number of people. In May 1937 she suffered a stroke and spent three months in a clinic at Tunbridge Wells recovering. Less than a year later she died in the same clinic of heart failure.

English hostess and patron of the arts who brought together some of the most important writers and artists of her day. She was the inspiration for Mrs Bidlake in Aldous Huxley's Point Counter Point, for Hermione Roddice in D. H. Lawrence's Women in Love, for Lady Caroline Bury in Graham Greene's It's a Battlefield, and for Lady Sybilline Quarrell in Alan Bennett's Forty Years On. She became "Lady" when her half-brother William succeeded to the Dukedom of Portland in 1879. Her best-known relative was her cousin Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon, later to become Queen to George VI. Ottoline married Liberal politician, Philip Morrell, in 1902, with whom she shared many views and interests, including an open marriage: both she and her husband had affairs and relationships with other people, while supporting and sticking with each other. The Morrells had one daughter, Julian. Ottoline was involved with, among others, philosopher Bertrand Russell, painter Augustus John, artist Dora Carrington, novelist Dorothy Bussy, and artist Roger Fry. She also became good friends with writer Virginia Woolf. She held a manor east of Oxford at Garsington, which became a well-known literary and political salon. She maintained the strong religiosity of her youth, doing good works and caring for a great number of people. In May 1937 she suffered a stroke and spent three months in a clinic at Tunbridge Wells recovering. Less than a year later she died in the same clinic of heart failure.


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