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 Christine McVie

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Christine McVie Famous memorial

Original Name
Christine Anne Perfect
Birth
Bouth, South Lakeland District, Cumbria, England
Death
30 Nov 2022 (aged 79)
London, City of London, Greater London, England
Burial
Cremated
Memorial ID
246073826 View Source

Musician. Born in rural Northwest England, she was exposed to music at an early age by her father who was a concert violinist and lecturer at Saint Peter's College in Birmingham. Though brought up around music, she did not immerse herself into a classical education until her early teens. Her scope of music was forever changed when she was introduced to the world of Rock N' Roll via the music of a pioneer of that genre, Fats Domino. While studying at the Moseley School of Art, she began her foray into performing music when she began singing with two of the founding members of the English blues band, "Chicken Shack." During this same time period, she also performed with Spencer Davis who would go on to found his eponymous "Spencer Davis Group." Upon the formation of "Chicken Shack" in 1967, McVie took up her place in the newly minted group, providing background vocals and playing the keyboard and piano. In 1968, she met and married fellow musician, bassist John McVie of the burgeoning blues rock band, "Fleetwood Mac." Following the release of her first solo album in 1970, she joined "Fleetwood Mac" during a tumultuous period in the band's career. Co-founding member Peter Green had just departed the band and a series of other lineup changes were on the horizon including the departures of guitarists Jeremy Spencer & Danny Kirwan between 1971-1972 and recruiting American singer-guitarist Bob Welch as their frontman in 1971, playing on five albums from 1971-74. The albums released during this period include: "Kiln House" (1970), "Future Games" (1971), "Bare Trees" (1972), "Penguin" (1973), "Mystery to Me" (1973) & "Heroes Are Hard to Find" (1974), marking a transition from blues rock to pop rock-soft rock. In late 1974, the most famous form (lineup) of the band took place when American musicians, guitarist Lindsey Buckingham and vocalist Stevie Nicks of the band "Buckingham Nicks" became members of Fleetwood Mac when the band moved from England to Los Angeles, California. The following year, the eponymous album "Fleetwood Mac" (1975) peaked at number one on the American charts. McVie's contributions to the album, "Over My Head," and "Say You Love Me" helped fuel the album's meteoric success. Moving from Reprise Records to the main label, Warner Bros. Records, the follow-up album "Rumours" (1977) became the band's signature work, with McVie's composition "Don't Stop" reaching number three on the charts. While the band's growing success was undeniable, the members' personal lives were suffering from a string of affairs and heavy drug use. McVie suffered the loss of her marriage and the group's follow up attempt "Tusk" (1979), though radical in its direction, failed to achieve similar success as its predecessors. Her song, "Think About Me," was one of three compositions from the album which broke the top 20 on the record charts. Following a brief respite in the early 1980s, the band returned with a series of albums including, "Mirage" (1982) and "Tango in the Night" (1987). The former garnered McVie a hit with the single, "Hold Me." The latter yielded the hits, "Everywhere," and "Little Lies." Following a retirement from the rigors of touring with Fleetwood Mac, McVie returned to the stage with the group when they were inducted into the Rock And Roll Hall of Fame's Class of 1998. Following the momentous occasion, McVie again took hiatus from the group, returning to England where she released her third solo album, 2004's "In the Meantime." During this period, she was also honored by Britain's Ivor's Academy with the Gold Badge of Merit. In 2013, she made her first stage appearance in over fifteen years when she reunited with bandmates, Mick Fleetwood and John McVie. That Autumn, she took the stage with Fleetwood Mac at London's O2 Arena. In early 2014, it was announced that McVie had officially broken her hiatus and was returning to Fleetwood Mac full-time. In addition to her work with Fleetwood Mac during this period, she also released a collaborative effort with her former bandmate Lindsey Buckingham, simply entitled "Buckingham McVie." The album rose to number 17 on the U.S. charts and was accompanied with a North American tour in support of the album. In addition to her induction to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Gold Badge of Merit, McVie was honored with the Ivor Novello Award for Lifetime Achievement and the Trailblazer Award.

Musician. Born in rural Northwest England, she was exposed to music at an early age by her father who was a concert violinist and lecturer at Saint Peter's College in Birmingham. Though brought up around music, she did not immerse herself into a classical education until her early teens. Her scope of music was forever changed when she was introduced to the world of Rock N' Roll via the music of a pioneer of that genre, Fats Domino. While studying at the Moseley School of Art, she began her foray into performing music when she began singing with two of the founding members of the English blues band, "Chicken Shack." During this same time period, she also performed with Spencer Davis who would go on to found his eponymous "Spencer Davis Group." Upon the formation of "Chicken Shack" in 1967, McVie took up her place in the newly minted group, providing background vocals and playing the keyboard and piano. In 1968, she met and married fellow musician, bassist John McVie of the burgeoning blues rock band, "Fleetwood Mac." Following the release of her first solo album in 1970, she joined "Fleetwood Mac" during a tumultuous period in the band's career. Co-founding member Peter Green had just departed the band and a series of other lineup changes were on the horizon including the departures of guitarists Jeremy Spencer & Danny Kirwan between 1971-1972 and recruiting American singer-guitarist Bob Welch as their frontman in 1971, playing on five albums from 1971-74. The albums released during this period include: "Kiln House" (1970), "Future Games" (1971), "Bare Trees" (1972), "Penguin" (1973), "Mystery to Me" (1973) & "Heroes Are Hard to Find" (1974), marking a transition from blues rock to pop rock-soft rock. In late 1974, the most famous form (lineup) of the band took place when American musicians, guitarist Lindsey Buckingham and vocalist Stevie Nicks of the band "Buckingham Nicks" became members of Fleetwood Mac when the band moved from England to Los Angeles, California. The following year, the eponymous album "Fleetwood Mac" (1975) peaked at number one on the American charts. McVie's contributions to the album, "Over My Head," and "Say You Love Me" helped fuel the album's meteoric success. Moving from Reprise Records to the main label, Warner Bros. Records, the follow-up album "Rumours" (1977) became the band's signature work, with McVie's composition "Don't Stop" reaching number three on the charts. While the band's growing success was undeniable, the members' personal lives were suffering from a string of affairs and heavy drug use. McVie suffered the loss of her marriage and the group's follow up attempt "Tusk" (1979), though radical in its direction, failed to achieve similar success as its predecessors. Her song, "Think About Me," was one of three compositions from the album which broke the top 20 on the record charts. Following a brief respite in the early 1980s, the band returned with a series of albums including, "Mirage" (1982) and "Tango in the Night" (1987). The former garnered McVie a hit with the single, "Hold Me." The latter yielded the hits, "Everywhere," and "Little Lies." Following a retirement from the rigors of touring with Fleetwood Mac, McVie returned to the stage with the group when they were inducted into the Rock And Roll Hall of Fame's Class of 1998. Following the momentous occasion, McVie again took hiatus from the group, returning to England where she released her third solo album, 2004's "In the Meantime." During this period, she was also honored by Britain's Ivor's Academy with the Gold Badge of Merit. In 2013, she made her first stage appearance in over fifteen years when she reunited with bandmates, Mick Fleetwood and John McVie. That Autumn, she took the stage with Fleetwood Mac at London's O2 Arena. In early 2014, it was announced that McVie had officially broken her hiatus and was returning to Fleetwood Mac full-time. In addition to her work with Fleetwood Mac during this period, she also released a collaborative effort with her former bandmate Lindsey Buckingham, simply entitled "Buckingham McVie." The album rose to number 17 on the U.S. charts and was accompanied with a North American tour in support of the album. In addition to her induction to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Gold Badge of Merit, McVie was honored with the Ivor Novello Award for Lifetime Achievement and the Trailblazer Award.

Bio by: Kentucky Hill Hunter


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