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 Andrew Ferguson

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Andrew Ferguson

Birth
Dinwiddie County, Virginia, USA
Death
1 Oct 1855 (aged 90)
Monroe County, Indiana, USA
Burial
Bloomington, Monroe County, Indiana, USA
Plot
Old Spencer
Memorial ID
24304172 View Source

Each day during Black History Month, The Herald-Times will profile a different African-American who has made history here in our area. This is the first in the series.

For more than a century, one of the few black veterans of the Revolutionary War buried in Indiana lay at rest in an unmarked grave at Bloomington's Rose Hill Cemetery, largely forgotten by history. That changed in 1984, when Andrew Ferguson was honored with a headstone dedicated by the Daughters of the American Revolution.

Ferguson was born in Virginia in 1765 and lived out his last several decades in Bloomington. According to his pension application, he served for some time during his middle teenage years in the Continental Army under Gen. Green. After fighting a number of battles between 1780 and 1781, he was wounded in the head by Cornwallis' troops near Guilford, N.C. A silver plate was placed in his head, after which he spent several months in recovery and was discharged, returning home to Virginia by 1781.

According to census records, he moved to Indiana some time between 1820 and 1830, and during his later years was described by the editor of the Bloomington Courier as a "greatly liked . pensioner, drawing a small pittance for his yeoman services" in the Revolutionary War, who worked a number of odd jobs about town. Little else is known about Ferguson, as he appears in few historical records.

Gen. George Washington lifted the ban on black enlistment in the Continental Army during early 1776.

The Daughters of the American Revolution doesn't know for sure how many blacks served in the Continental Army during the war, but some sources have estimated the number at about 5,000.

By Colin Bishop
The Herald-Times, February 1, 2008


From genealogyfever.
The following information was abstracted by Randi Richardson from multiple documents associated with the pension application of Andrew Ferguson, a veteran of the Revolutionary War. Digitized images of the documents were found online at www.fold3.com.

On August 16,1838, Andrew Furgison (sic), age 73 as of July 1838, and a resident of Monroe County, Indiana, applied for a pension.

According to that application, Andrew was colored and a native of Dinwiddie, Virginia.

He noted that he and his father, Andrew Perley (difficult to read) were taken prisoners by the British and whipped with cat-o-nine tail. Subsequently they ran away and joined the American soldiers. Andrew served as a private between four to five years in the Revolutionary War from the State of Virginia, first under General Green and later under Capt. Harris. During the course of his experience, he was wounded several times. On September 10, 1839, Andrew was granted a pension for his service, No. S 32,243. It was sent to Bloomington, Indiana.

On January 8, 1851, Andrew Ferguson of Monroe County, Indiana, applied for bounty land. At that time he reportedly was 96 years old. He applied again in 1855. William Edmonson and David Smith wrote letters on his behalf. In May 1856, he was sent a certificate for 160 acres, but by that time he had died, reportedly in the latter part of 1855. His wife had died a week previous to Andrew's death, and there were no known heirs that survived.

The certificate was returned with a letter of explanation. In that letter it was noted that Mr. and Mrs. Ferguson were paupers living at the expense of the county at the time of their death.

Each day during Black History Month, The Herald-Times will profile a different African-American who has made history here in our area. This is the first in the series.

For more than a century, one of the few black veterans of the Revolutionary War buried in Indiana lay at rest in an unmarked grave at Bloomington's Rose Hill Cemetery, largely forgotten by history. That changed in 1984, when Andrew Ferguson was honored with a headstone dedicated by the Daughters of the American Revolution.

Ferguson was born in Virginia in 1765 and lived out his last several decades in Bloomington. According to his pension application, he served for some time during his middle teenage years in the Continental Army under Gen. Green. After fighting a number of battles between 1780 and 1781, he was wounded in the head by Cornwallis' troops near Guilford, N.C. A silver plate was placed in his head, after which he spent several months in recovery and was discharged, returning home to Virginia by 1781.

According to census records, he moved to Indiana some time between 1820 and 1830, and during his later years was described by the editor of the Bloomington Courier as a "greatly liked . pensioner, drawing a small pittance for his yeoman services" in the Revolutionary War, who worked a number of odd jobs about town. Little else is known about Ferguson, as he appears in few historical records.

Gen. George Washington lifted the ban on black enlistment in the Continental Army during early 1776.

The Daughters of the American Revolution doesn't know for sure how many blacks served in the Continental Army during the war, but some sources have estimated the number at about 5,000.

By Colin Bishop
The Herald-Times, February 1, 2008


From genealogyfever.
The following information was abstracted by Randi Richardson from multiple documents associated with the pension application of Andrew Ferguson, a veteran of the Revolutionary War. Digitized images of the documents were found online at www.fold3.com.

On August 16,1838, Andrew Furgison (sic), age 73 as of July 1838, and a resident of Monroe County, Indiana, applied for a pension.

According to that application, Andrew was colored and a native of Dinwiddie, Virginia.

He noted that he and his father, Andrew Perley (difficult to read) were taken prisoners by the British and whipped with cat-o-nine tail. Subsequently they ran away and joined the American soldiers. Andrew served as a private between four to five years in the Revolutionary War from the State of Virginia, first under General Green and later under Capt. Harris. During the course of his experience, he was wounded several times. On September 10, 1839, Andrew was granted a pension for his service, No. S 32,243. It was sent to Bloomington, Indiana.

On January 8, 1851, Andrew Ferguson of Monroe County, Indiana, applied for bounty land. At that time he reportedly was 96 years old. He applied again in 1855. William Edmonson and David Smith wrote letters on his behalf. In May 1856, he was sent a certificate for 160 acres, but by that time he had died, reportedly in the latter part of 1855. His wife had died a week previous to Andrew's death, and there were no known heirs that survived.

The certificate was returned with a letter of explanation. In that letter it was noted that Mr. and Mrs. Ferguson were paupers living at the expense of the county at the time of their death.

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  • Created by: Ron
  • Added: 1 Feb 2008
  • Find a Grave Memorial ID: 24304172
  • Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/24304172/andrew-ferguson: accessed ), memorial page for Andrew Ferguson (Jul 1765–1 Oct 1855), Find a Grave Memorial ID 24304172, citing Rose Hill Cemetery, Bloomington, Monroe County, Indiana, USA; Maintained by Ron (contributor 46936086) .