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 Vincent Edward “Vin” Scully

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Vincent Edward “Vin” Scully Famous memorial

Birth
Bronx, Bronx County, New York, USA
Death
2 Aug 2022 (aged 94)
Hidden Hills, Los Angeles County, California, USA
Burial
Burial Details Unknown
Memorial ID
242272369 View Source
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Sportscaster. Born in New York, he developed a love for America's past time whilst watching game two of the 1936 World Series at the tender age of eight. After two years of service in the United States Navy, Scully enrolled at the Fordham Jesuit University in New York City. It was during his time there that made his first foray into broadcasting, helping to found the school's radio station. On air, he called the school's athletic teams' games, developing his radio persona. Following his graduation from the university, he began work as a CBS radio affiliate broadcaster. Beginning in 1950, Scully became an associate sportscaster for the Brooklyn Dodgers baseball program. Initially, working in tandem with legendary announcers Red Barber and Connie Desmond, Scully later became the primary announcer for the team in 1954. The year prior, at the age of 26, he became the youngest broadcaster for a World Series game. His record for this feat remains unbroken to the present. Following the Dodgers relocation to Los Angles in 1957, Scully remained with the program, becoming highly popular amongst the new fans of Southern California. In addition to his most noted role in baseball, Scully also called a great number of NFL, tennis, and golf games during his tenure as a broadcaster for CBS Sports. In 1983, he parted ways with CBS, joining the NBC Sports network to focus on his beloved game of baseball. Over six years as NBC's lead baseball broadcaster, Scully called a number of notable games including three World Series, four NL championship series, and four All Star Games. In 1989 the television broadcast rights for Major League Baseball reverted from NBC to CBS. The same year, Scully departed NBC to resume his responsibilities at Dodger Stadium. As the announcer for LA and the national radio announcer for the MLB World Series, Scully remained busy after over four decades of a broadcasting career. The 2016 baseball season proved to be his final with the Dodgers. With a career lasting an astounding sixty-seven years, he shattered all records, becoming the uncontested longest serving broadcaster for a single profession sports team in history. Known for his distinct voice and descriptive delivery of plays, Scully endeared himself to the sports community. Over his lengthy career, he was honored with a number of awards and recognitions of his service to the broadcasting and sporting communities. A four time National Sportscaster of the Year honoree, he was also inducted as a member of National Radio Hall of Fame, the National Sports Media Association Hall of Fame, the California Sports Hall of Fame, and the National Association of Broadcasters Hall of Fame. In addition, he was given an Emmy to mark his lifetime achievement in sportscasting, and was also ranked as the greatest sportscaster of all time by the American Sportscasters Association. Within his adopted state of California, Scully was honored with a Hollywood Walk of Fame star, had the press box at Dodger Stadium renamed in his honor, and has a number of streets that now bear his name. During his final season with the Dodger's, Scully was presented with the key to the city of Los Angeles, had a special day set aside bearing his name, and was honored with the renaming of the Dodger Stadium's home address to "Vin Scully Way." In November of that same year, he was bestowed the highest civilian honor in the United States, when he was present with the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

Sportscaster. Born in New York, he developed a love for America's past time whilst watching game two of the 1936 World Series at the tender age of eight. After two years of service in the United States Navy, Scully enrolled at the Fordham Jesuit University in New York City. It was during his time there that made his first foray into broadcasting, helping to found the school's radio station. On air, he called the school's athletic teams' games, developing his radio persona. Following his graduation from the university, he began work as a CBS radio affiliate broadcaster. Beginning in 1950, Scully became an associate sportscaster for the Brooklyn Dodgers baseball program. Initially, working in tandem with legendary announcers Red Barber and Connie Desmond, Scully later became the primary announcer for the team in 1954. The year prior, at the age of 26, he became the youngest broadcaster for a World Series game. His record for this feat remains unbroken to the present. Following the Dodgers relocation to Los Angles in 1957, Scully remained with the program, becoming highly popular amongst the new fans of Southern California. In addition to his most noted role in baseball, Scully also called a great number of NFL, tennis, and golf games during his tenure as a broadcaster for CBS Sports. In 1983, he parted ways with CBS, joining the NBC Sports network to focus on his beloved game of baseball. Over six years as NBC's lead baseball broadcaster, Scully called a number of notable games including three World Series, four NL championship series, and four All Star Games. In 1989 the television broadcast rights for Major League Baseball reverted from NBC to CBS. The same year, Scully departed NBC to resume his responsibilities at Dodger Stadium. As the announcer for LA and the national radio announcer for the MLB World Series, Scully remained busy after over four decades of a broadcasting career. The 2016 baseball season proved to be his final with the Dodgers. With a career lasting an astounding sixty-seven years, he shattered all records, becoming the uncontested longest serving broadcaster for a single profession sports team in history. Known for his distinct voice and descriptive delivery of plays, Scully endeared himself to the sports community. Over his lengthy career, he was honored with a number of awards and recognitions of his service to the broadcasting and sporting communities. A four time National Sportscaster of the Year honoree, he was also inducted as a member of National Radio Hall of Fame, the National Sports Media Association Hall of Fame, the California Sports Hall of Fame, and the National Association of Broadcasters Hall of Fame. In addition, he was given an Emmy to mark his lifetime achievement in sportscasting, and was also ranked as the greatest sportscaster of all time by the American Sportscasters Association. Within his adopted state of California, Scully was honored with a Hollywood Walk of Fame star, had the press box at Dodger Stadium renamed in his honor, and has a number of streets that now bear his name. During his final season with the Dodger's, Scully was presented with the key to the city of Los Angeles, had a special day set aside bearing his name, and was honored with the renaming of the Dodger Stadium's home address to "Vin Scully Way." In November of that same year, he was bestowed the highest civilian honor in the United States, when he was present with the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

Bio by: Kentucky Hill Hunter


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