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 William Felton “Bill” Russell

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William Felton “Bill” Russell Famous memorial

Birth
West Monroe, Ouachita Parish, Louisiana, USA
Death
31 Jul 2022 (aged 88)
Mercer Island, King County, Washington, USA
Burial
Memorial ID
242184906 View Source
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Hall of Fame Professional Basketball Player, Coach. He played the center position for the National Basketball Association's Boston Celtics from 1956 to 1969. He also coached three different NBA teams (Boston Celtics (1966-1969), Seattle Supersonics (1973-1977), and Sacramento Kings (1987-1988)). He played basketball collegiately at the University of San Francisco and helped lead the Dons to two consecutive NCAA basketball championships (1955, 1956). In 1956, he played on the gold medal-winning U.S. men's basketball team at the Summer Olympics in Melbourne, Australia. He was drafted by the St. Louis Hawks with the 2nd pick in the 1956 NBA draft, but was traded to the Boston Celtics soon after. He went on to star for the Celtics for fourteen years, four of them as a player-coach, before retiring in 1969. In 1966, he became the first African-American head coach in NBA history, when he succeeded Red Auerbach at the helm of the Celtics. During his tenure with the Celtics, he helped them win 11 NBA Championship titles and received numerous other honors and awards. His playing career statistics included 14,522 points, 21,620 rebounds, and 4,100 assists. In 1971, he joined the broadcast team for NBA on ABC and worked the Game of the Week each week. A year later, the Celtics retired his number "6." He went on to later coach both the Seattle Supersonics from 1973 to 1975 and the Sacramento Kings from 1987 to 1988. He was inducted into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame in 1975, and in 2011, he was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom by President Barack Obama.

Hall of Fame Professional Basketball Player, Coach. He played the center position for the National Basketball Association's Boston Celtics from 1956 to 1969. He also coached three different NBA teams (Boston Celtics (1966-1969), Seattle Supersonics (1973-1977), and Sacramento Kings (1987-1988)). He played basketball collegiately at the University of San Francisco and helped lead the Dons to two consecutive NCAA basketball championships (1955, 1956). In 1956, he played on the gold medal-winning U.S. men's basketball team at the Summer Olympics in Melbourne, Australia. He was drafted by the St. Louis Hawks with the 2nd pick in the 1956 NBA draft, but was traded to the Boston Celtics soon after. He went on to star for the Celtics for fourteen years, four of them as a player-coach, before retiring in 1969. In 1966, he became the first African-American head coach in NBA history, when he succeeded Red Auerbach at the helm of the Celtics. During his tenure with the Celtics, he helped them win 11 NBA Championship titles and received numerous other honors and awards. His playing career statistics included 14,522 points, 21,620 rebounds, and 4,100 assists. In 1971, he joined the broadcast team for NBA on ABC and worked the Game of the Week each week. A year later, the Celtics retired his number "6." He went on to later coach both the Seattle Supersonics from 1973 to 1975 and the Sacramento Kings from 1987 to 1988. He was inducted into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame in 1975, and in 2011, he was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom by President Barack Obama.

Bio by: Mr. Badger Hawkeye


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