The Photo Request has been fulfilled.

 
Rev Benjamin Haywood

Rev Benjamin Haywood

Birth
Nottinghamshire, England
Death 9 Jul 1878 (aged 72)
Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania, USA
Burial Pottsville, Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania, USA
Memorial ID 23997851 · View Source
Suggest Edits

Rev. Benjamin Haywood was the son of Thomas and Jane Haywood. He was the husband of Sarah (Rhein) Haywood. Rev. Haywood was a Local Preacher in the Methodist Episcopal Church. He was also an Iron Master.

History of Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania, 1881, Pgs. 308-309
Biography of Benjamin Haywood

Benjamin Haywood, manufacturer, was born in Southwell, near Nottingham, England, November 9th, 1804, and died July 9, 1878. His father and grandfather had both been manufacturers of hardware, and at the age of twelve he was apprenticed to a blacksmith, with whom he served his time. When twenty-four he emigrated to the United States, landing at New York in 1829. Not succeeding in finding work, he went to Philadelphia, and thence, on foot, to Reading, where he was advised to try his fortune in Pottsville. After working there for a short time as a journeyman, he contrived to commence business in a small way on his own account. The system of mining coal below the water level being introduced about this time, his keen foresight showed him the future mechanical needs of Pottsville. He went to Philadelphia in 1833, where he purchased a steam engine and some other machinery for his shop. This engine was put up by George W. Snyder, and was the first employed in Schuylkill County. In 1835 his sound judgment led to his formation of the well known firm of Haywood & Snyder. Pottsville (his small machine shop being removed from Port Carbon for that purpose), established for building steam engines, mining and other machinery. In 1845 the firm erected an extensive machine shop and foundry at Danville, Pennsylvania. At that place and in Pottsville they constructed the machinery for the Montour Iron Company, the Phoenix Iron Company, for Peter Cooper, at Trenton, New Jersey, and for Bevan, Humphries & Company, of Allentown, Pennsylvania. They made the first set of rolls for the manufacture of T-rails in the United States. In 1845 they constructed the first apparatus for sawing hot iron. Aside from this business they were heavily engaged in coal mining operations, as Milnes, Haywood & Company. The main burden of this business fell on the subject of this sketch, who in 1850 disposed of all his different interests and went to California, but was at first unsuccessful. He had shipped a large number of frame houses to San Francisco, but they proved unsaleable and he did not realize the cost of freight. With customary energy he engaged in the lumber business, erecting for that purpose a steam engine and saw-mill near Sonora--the first put-up in California outside of San Francisco. He was again unfortunate and returned to San Francisco without means. Borrowing a little money from one of his apprentice boys he again started as a blacksmith; subsequently adding the making of iron shutters, fire-proof doors and bank vaults. In this he was highly successful, and while there had been many offers of positions of trust and responsibility, he declined them all. He became intimate with General William T. Sherman and Governor Geary, of Pennsylvania, remaining a firm friend of the latter until his death. He organized the Mechanics' Institute of San Francisco--now the most flourishing one on the Pacific Coast. He was its President until his departure.
After an absence of five years he decided to return to Pottsville. He disposed of his business in the West at a handsome profit. His return to his old field of action was greeted by a perfect ovation. The old workmen of Haywood & Snyder met him at the depot, and escorted him into the town in triumphal procession. He then purchased an interest in the Palo Alto Rolling Mill, at that time a small concern. It was first carried on by the firm of Haywood, Lee & Company; then by Benjamin Haywood & Company, and still later by Benjamin Haywood alone, who was its sole proprietor until his death. The establishment grew into vast proportions. The capacity of the works was 20,000 tons annually, the number of hands employed 500, with a monthly payroll of $20,000; and the yearly amount of business was from $1,000,000 to $1,500,000. After the beginning of the late depression in the iron industries of our country, these works were for some time continued in operation with the benevolent intention of giving employment to the men, as the proprietor was independently wealthy from other sources. In 1862, he superintended the erection of the works of the Allentown Rolling Mill Company, and was its president for some years. In 1865 he built the Lochiel Iron Works at Harrisburg, by express desire of Simon Cameron.
He was a man of almost universal powers and attainments; possessed of a large brain, a firm, determined will, unusual activity and energy, an extensive knowledge of men and things. He seemed to perform his work of all kinds by a species of intuition and was certainly one of the most extraordinary men in the State of Pennsylvania. He was active in politics (though uniformly declining office) and was early a member of the old Whig or Home Industry party, but later joined the Republicans. He was one of the commissioners for organizing the Union Pacific Railroad, with Colonel Thomas A. Scott and J. Edgar Thompson. His sound judgment and clear insight of the merits of a case pointed him out as a leader in his party. His opinion was well to obtain before deciding upon any important measure. He was frequently summoned to Washington to aid with his counsel on critical occasions, when serious matters concerning the politico-industrial interests and welfare of the country were at stake. He was intimate with most of the eminent statesmen of the day, including some of our Presidents.
He belonged to the Methodist Episcopal Church and was long an accredited Local Preacher of that body. In 1829 there was no church in Pottsville; but with others he labored whenever he had the opportunity and sowed some of the first religious seeds in that town. An ardent advocate of temperance, he was ever ready, by word or purse, to advance the cause. His mind being stored with correct information on most subjects, he was competent at a moment's notice to preach an impressive sermon, deliver a powerful temperance lecture, or make a telling "stump" speech. He was a kind friend to the colored people; a generous benefactor to the working man and the poor. During the war he was selected by Governor Curtin to visit the Pennsylvania troops and look to their comforts. By authority he reclothed many regiments, one of them being the Fourth Pennsylvania Volunteers, of which Governor Hartranft was a Colonel. He was also chairman of the investigating committee in the Girard clothing troubles, resulting in the complete vindication of A. G. Curtin. He was an entirely self-made man He was the architect of his own fortune, and though his early education was much neglected, he had a wide knowledge of books and was well read on most subjects. His most congenial studies were the Bible and the poets, of whom Shakespeare was his favorite.
In 1830, he was married to a daughter of Daniel Rhein--the first friend he found in this country, and a fine speciman of an honorable, godly man, who died at the age of ninety. His domestic relations were peculiarly happy, and his marriage was somewhat tinged by romance--it being by his wife's father's direction that he settled in Pottsville. He had five children by this union--two sons and three daughters--of whom two daughters only are living. One of them is married to Hugh W. Adams, a patriotic and active Union officer, who served under General Grant at Vicksburg, gaining an honorable military record. He is now engaged in the wholesale dry goods business at Lexington, Kentucky, and in high commercial standing. The other is the wife of Thomas F. Wright, a successful iron and blast furnace proprietor in New York State, and a worthy and excellent gentleman.







Family Members

Spouse
Children

Inscription

"Benjamin Haywood
son of
Thomas and Jane Haywood
born in Southwell, England
November 9th, 1805
died July 9th, 1878"


Advertisement

Advertisement

Advertisement

  • Created by: Mary Jane Haight-Eckert
  • Added: 16 Jan 2008
  • Find A Grave Memorial 23997851
  • Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed ), memorial page for Rev Benjamin Haywood (9 Nov 1805–9 Jul 1878), Find A Grave Memorial no. 23997851, citing Charles Baber Cemetery, Pottsville, Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania, USA ; Maintained by Mary Jane Haight-Eckert (contributor 46560908) .