Vano Muradeli

Vano Muradeli

Birth
Gori, Shida Kartli, Georgia
Death 14 Aug 1970 (aged 62)
Tomsk, Tomsk Oblast, Russia
Burial Moscow, Moscow Federal City, Russia
Plot Section 7
Memorial ID 23980719 · View Source
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Composer. His uncomplicated, populist style was based on Russian folk songs and dances. A decidedly minor talent, he gained a place in Soviet music history for political rather than artistic reasons. Vano Ilyich Muradeli was born in Gori, Georgia. He studied at the Tbilisi State Conservatory and from 1934 to 1938 took post-graduate courses at the Moscow Conservatory. During World War II he directed the Central Ensemble of the USSR Navy. From the outset of his career Muradeli eagerly sought the favor of the Communist regime and appeared to have won it with his propaganda ballet "Zoya" (1946), which received a Stalin Prize. But he miscalculated with his next opus, the opera "The Great Friendship" (1947), set in his native Georgia during the Russian Civil War. Stalin hated the piece and decided to use its unlucky author as a pawn in his long-planned purge of the country's postwar classical music scene. At the February 1948 Congress of Soviet Composers in Moscow, chaired by Stalin's cultural commissar Andrei Zhdanov, Muradeli duly confessed that "The Great Friendship" was "formalist, anti-people music" but claimed it was only a symptom of a much bigger problem: he had been "negatively influenced" by the leading Soviet musicians - Shostakovich, Prokofiev, Khachaturian, Myaskovsky, and Shebalin - all of whom then came under swift attack. In the end they were declared "Enemies of the People", their music was banned and they were stripped of their official honors and positions. Prokofiev and Myaskovsky would die before their reputations were restored and the fallout from the Congress ruined Shebalin's health. As for Muradeli, he bounced back with a cantata praising Stalin, "The Road of Victory" (1951), and was rehabilitated after the dictator's death two years later. He was named People's Artist of the USSR in 1968. His other compositions include many songs for chorus, two symphonies (1938, 1945), "Georgian Suite" for orchestra (1939), "Festive Overture" (1940), and the folk opera "October" (1964), which has the curious distinction of being the first to use a singing Lenin.

Bio by: Bobb Edwards


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  • Maintained by: Find a Grave
  • Originally Created by: Bobb Edwards
  • Added: 15 Jan 2008
  • Find a Grave Memorial 23980719
  • Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed ), memorial page for Vano Muradeli (6 Apr 1908–14 Aug 1970), Find a Grave Memorial no. 23980719, citing Novodevichy Cemetery, Moscow, Moscow Federal City, Russia ; Maintained by Find A Grave .