Mikhail Kalatozov

Mikhail Kalatozov

Birth
Tbilisi, Tbilisi, Georgia
Death 27 Mar 1973 (aged 69)
Moscow, Moscow Federal City, Russia
Burial Moscow, Moscow Federal City, Russia
Plot Section 7, Grave 5
Memorial ID 23980204 · View Source
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Motion Picture Director. Born Mikheil Konstantinovich Kalatozishvili in Tiflis (now Tblisi), Russia, he entered films in 1925 as an actor and then worked as an assistant editor and cameraman at the Georgian studios. His debut as a director, "Salt for Svanetia" (1930), is an acutely observed, beautifully photographed documentary of life in a primitive Caucasian village. Now regarded as a classic of Soviet-era Cinema, it was initially criticized by government authorities for alleged "negativism". "A Nail in the Boot" (1932), his second feature, was immediately banned and seven years would pass before he was allowed to direct another film. In the interim he proved his value to officialdom as a studio administrator. During World War II he represented the Soviet movie industry in Hollywood and from 1946 to 1948 served as Deputy Minister of Cinematography of the USSR. After decades of obscurity Kalatozov enjoyed a great international success with "The Cranes Are Flying" (1957), a lyrical story of wartime romance. Completely devoid of propaganda, it was welcomed as the first manifestation of Khrushchev's cultural "thaw" in Soviet films, paving the way for such directors as Andrei Tarkovsky, Andrei Konchalovsky, and Elem Klimov. It won the Golden Palm at the 1958 Cannes Festival. Even more celebrated today is "I Am Cuba" (1964), co-produced by the USSR and the Castro regime. Though clearly an agit-prop film, its acrobatic cinematography and spirited exuberance made it the most visually dazzling Soviet documentary since Dziga Vertov's "The Man With a Movie Camera" (1929). A 1995 international reissue of "I Am Cuba" was sponsored by director Martin Scorsese. Apart from these and "Salt for Svanetia" Kalatozov's sparse output is uneven, leading some critics to wonder how his talents would have developed under less oppressive circumstances. His other credits include "Courage" (1939), "Wings of Victory" (1941), "Conspiracy of the Doomed" (1950), "True Friends" (1954), "The First Echelon", "The Hostile Wind" (both 1956), "The Letter That Was Never Sent" (1960), and "The Red Tent" (1971).

Bio by: Bobb Edwards


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  • Maintained by: Find A Grave
  • Originally Created by: Bobb Edwards
  • Added: 15 Jan 2008
  • Find A Grave Memorial 23980204
  • Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed ), memorial page for Mikhail Kalatozov (28 Dec 1903–27 Mar 1973), Find A Grave Memorial no. 23980204, citing Novodevichy Cemetery, Moscow, Moscow Federal City, Russia ; Maintained by Find A Grave .