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Elizabeth James

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Elizabeth James

Birth
Death
1860 (aged 56–57)
Burial
Burial Details Unknown Add to Map
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On or about 1858, Elizabeth James and her husband Isaac James(1797-1880) migrated from Elbert County, Georgia to Newton County, Mississippi along with four of their sons including: William Elias James (age 35), Isaac Richard James (age 28), Marion Lumpkin James (age 24) and Sanford Augustus James (age 16). Their daughter Susannah Francis James (age 17) along with ten grandchildren also accompanied them to Newton County, Mississippi. Elizabeth left behind four married children and one who was soon to be married including two sons: Thomas Edmund James (age 34) and Alvin Alexander James (age 21); and, their three eldest daughters including: Miram Elizabeth James (age 32), Martha Emily James (age 30) and Maryan Amanda James (age 26).

Elizabeth died on or about 1860, prior to the advent of the War of the Rebellion ("Civil War") (April 12, 1861 – April 9, 1865, but four of her sons including: Isaac Richard James, Marion Lumpkin James, Alven Alexander James and Sanford Augustus James all served in the Confederate States Army during the Civil War. On September 2, 1862, Sanford Augustus James succumbed to illness and died at Camp Pleasant in Vicksburg, Mississippi. On September 20, 1862, Isaac Richard James also succumbed to illness and was sent to a military hospital at Mississippi Springs, Mississippi where he died on October 15, 1862. Marion Lumpkin James would go on and fight against Union forces led by generals Grant and Sherman during the Siege of Vicksburg (May 18, 1863 – July 4, 1863). Marion was captured toward the end of the Siege, but escaped and was later captured again at the Battle of Nashville (December 15, 1864 – December 16, 1864). He was imprisoned at Camp Chase in Columbus, Ohio, died of dysentery on April 26, 1865, and was buried at the Camp Chase Confederate Cemetery in grave No. 1920. Alven Alexander James survived the war and returned home to his wife and children in Elbert County, Georgia.

By the end of the Civil War, Elizabeth's widower, Isaac James, and his eldest son William Elias James resettled on a section of land that straddled present day North Street in Union, Mississippi, then known as the "Dixon Community" in Neshoba County, Mississippi. Following Elizabeth's passing, her family suffered mightily during the Civil War. By its conclusion, her family had firmly settled in Mississippi.
On or about 1858, Elizabeth James and her husband Isaac James(1797-1880) migrated from Elbert County, Georgia to Newton County, Mississippi along with four of their sons including: William Elias James (age 35), Isaac Richard James (age 28), Marion Lumpkin James (age 24) and Sanford Augustus James (age 16). Their daughter Susannah Francis James (age 17) along with ten grandchildren also accompanied them to Newton County, Mississippi. Elizabeth left behind four married children and one who was soon to be married including two sons: Thomas Edmund James (age 34) and Alvin Alexander James (age 21); and, their three eldest daughters including: Miram Elizabeth James (age 32), Martha Emily James (age 30) and Maryan Amanda James (age 26).

Elizabeth died on or about 1860, prior to the advent of the War of the Rebellion ("Civil War") (April 12, 1861 – April 9, 1865, but four of her sons including: Isaac Richard James, Marion Lumpkin James, Alven Alexander James and Sanford Augustus James all served in the Confederate States Army during the Civil War. On September 2, 1862, Sanford Augustus James succumbed to illness and died at Camp Pleasant in Vicksburg, Mississippi. On September 20, 1862, Isaac Richard James also succumbed to illness and was sent to a military hospital at Mississippi Springs, Mississippi where he died on October 15, 1862. Marion Lumpkin James would go on and fight against Union forces led by generals Grant and Sherman during the Siege of Vicksburg (May 18, 1863 – July 4, 1863). Marion was captured toward the end of the Siege, but escaped and was later captured again at the Battle of Nashville (December 15, 1864 – December 16, 1864). He was imprisoned at Camp Chase in Columbus, Ohio, died of dysentery on April 26, 1865, and was buried at the Camp Chase Confederate Cemetery in grave No. 1920. Alven Alexander James survived the war and returned home to his wife and children in Elbert County, Georgia.

By the end of the Civil War, Elizabeth's widower, Isaac James, and his eldest son William Elias James resettled on a section of land that straddled present day North Street in Union, Mississippi, then known as the "Dixon Community" in Neshoba County, Mississippi. Following Elizabeth's passing, her family suffered mightily during the Civil War. By its conclusion, her family had firmly settled in Mississippi.

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