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 George Frederick “Fred” Moherman

George Frederick “Fred” Moherman

Birth
Mahoning County, Ohio, USA
Death 16 May 1965 (aged 84)
Youngstown, Mahoning County, Ohio, USA
Burial North Jackson, Mahoning County, Ohio, USA
Plot Section II Row 10
Memorial ID 23409630 · View Source
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MOHERMAN, George Frederick "Fred"
Husband of
1. Florence nee ECKIS
2. Kittie (Smith) nee CLEMMENS – m. 23 Oct 1960
Son of Robert and Katherine Wanamaker Moherman
B. 19 Apr 1881 in Jackson Twp., Mahoning Co. OH
D. 16 May 1965 in Youngstown, Mahoning Co. OH at 84y 27d
Burial – 19 May 1965 in Jackson Twp. Cemetery, Section II Row 10, North Jackson, Mahoning Co. OH

Mahoning Dispatch, Fri, 21 May 1965
"Mr. G. Fred Moherman, 84, of North Jackson, died of a cerebral hemorrhage Sunday afternoon in the S. S. hospital, following an illness of nine days. Born in Youngstown township, April 19, 1881, he was the son of Robert and Katherine Wanamaker Moherman and his entire life was spent in the community. Prior to his retirement about 12 years ago, he had operated a fleet of milk trucks. Mr. Moherman retired as a member of the board of directors of the Mahoning County Agricultural Society (Canfield Fair) in 1955, after serving for 35 years, and had held numerous offices, including that of president. Upon his retirement, he was made an honorary member of the board. Mr. Moherman was a charter member of the First Federated church of North Jackson, and a 54-year member of the Knights of Pythias. He leaves his wife, the former Kittie Clemmens Smith, whom he married Oct. 23, 1960. Funeral services, conducted by the Rev. James T. Wheeler, were held Wednesday afternoon at the Williams Funeral Home in Canfield interment made in the North Jackson cemetery."

Youngstown Vindicator, Undated – 1930'S
Fred Moherman Trucks Milk During Early Morn,
Spends Balance Of Day Assisting Canfield Fair
North Jackson Member of Board Sees Big Year For Exposition
Directs Sale of Tickets At Grounds; Chief Foe of Gate Crashers
By Esther Hamilton
Before 5 a.m. every day a long, lean, lanky, husky gentleman from North Jackson is on his truck and making the rounds of the farmers within a radius of 20 miles from his home. He's Fred Mo0herman, collecting milk to be taken to the dairy.
Mr. Moherman has been a member of the Canfield Fair Board 20 years and is now vice-president. He succeeded Ewing Gault and represents his district.
With his partner, C. A. Buck, four trucks are operated covering 250 miles and visiting some 200 farmers before Youngstown is out of bed. In the afternoon, to fill in their spare time, the trucks go all over the district, doing all kinds of hauling. Mr. Moherman can't drive a mile in Jackson Twp.-without meeting somebody who yells, "Hay there, Fred," and he always answers back and calls his friend by name.
Knows Everybody
"I don't know how many people I know in this township." He said today, "but likely most everybody."
He has been township trustee clerk of the Board of Elections and township treasurer. Whenever there is anything going on in his township, you'll find him there.
Probably no member of the fair board has had the fair held to him as a family tradition more than Mr. Moherman. His father Robert A. Moherman, now 89 years of age attended the first Canfield Fair when it was held on the public square at Canfield. He was taken in a basket by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Moherman, pioneer farmers of the county.
The board member thinks that this year's fair will be better than any its recent years. "The weather is just right, crisp and balmy," he says, "and cool nights and the warm days ought to bring the crops in just fine for the fair. We've had bumper crops this year. Most everybody has a little money in their pockets and the people ought to have a good time. We've got a better fair than we've ever had."
There's just one thing about the fair that always makes Mr. Moherman angry. He can't understand why people will spend money for the other amusements and then come out in the fairgrounds and try to crawl over the fence and get in for nothing.
He has charge of all the tickets and it's up to him to turn over to the treasurer either tickets or the money for them.
Mr. Moherman has never been one of these one-day fair goers. He has always attended both fair days and eventually manages to get over for entry day, too.
Of course there was the time when he was 15 when he almost missed the fair entirely. He was in New York City for a serious operation, had seven of them, in fact, one after another, and it looked as though he might not get home for the fair. He finally started home on an excursion train, got to Niles and took the train to Canfield, getting there at noon on the last day.
"But I was afraid I wouldn't make it," he recalled today, "In those days the trains pulled right up beside the fairgrounds and folks walked across."
Mr. Moherman as a youth usually had a quarter to spend and put most of it on the merry-go-round.
"Why," he said today, "I thought that merry-go-round was about the finest thing I'd ever seen in my life. I'd think about going around on that thing for a week before the fair and remember it all year."
Mr. Moherman was born 1 ½ miles from his present home on the 275-acre farm where his father still remains with his sister, Mrs. Isaac Hogg. He is the fourth generation of his family in North Jackson. John Moherman cleared the farm with an axe and built along the road. The Moherman homestead built in 1852 has been remodeled. It cost $1,900 to build originally and there are walnut timbers in the home that are 18 inches wide and 2 ½ thick.
As a boy, Mr. Moherman went to Walnut School and later to North Jackson. He worked on his father's farm, helping care for an average herd of 50 beef cattle marketed in Cleveland and Pittsburgh, and more than 100 head of sheep.
Recalls Big Snow
He recalls the winter of "the big snow" when the storm came up in a few hours and the sheep were scattered all over the farm before they were collected the next day. Most of them had to be brought in on sleds.
One of the tragedies of farming that he has never forgotten happened at the Moherman farm on Nov. 10, 1899. The barn was full of hay and grain. In some way it ignited and burned to the ground at a loss of more than $5000.
"In those days the farmer finished the year not knowing whether he had $100 or not, but we knew that year we had nothing and had to build a barn," he says.
Time and again the elder Moherman has refused to sell his farm. In the closing years of his life he likes to sit on its broad front porch, far from the road, and see the cars whiz by. Hundreds of times he has pulled up that road mud up to the hubs of his wagon from a trip to Youngstown.
Until he was 42 years of age he stayed on the farm. Then he went into the trucking business.
He thinks that all the "crazy drivers" in the world are out along the country roads in the early morning hours. He figures it's the time when a motorist must watch his foot the most.
"People think," he says, "that not many folks are out at that hour and so they all drive as though there was nobody on the road but them."
Times Are Different
It's a bit different for him to drive today than it used to be when he was handling horses and he has watched all the developments that good roads have brought to the farmers of his district.
"It's certainly something," he says, "to be a farmer and get a check for your milk every morning. Why, in the old days anybody who had a regular check coming he would have felt he was sitting on top of the world even if the check __________"
Note: Ended here due to missing material




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  • Maintained by: Stacy Orr
  • Originally Created by: Jennifer L. Neff
  • Added: 15 Dec 2007
  • Find A Grave Memorial 23409630
  • Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed ), memorial page for George Frederick “Fred” Moherman (19 Apr 1881–16 May 1965), Find A Grave Memorial no. 23409630, citing Jackson Township Cemetery, North Jackson, Mahoning County, Ohio, USA ; Maintained by Stacy Orr (contributor 47402137) .