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Maj Charles Frederick Taggart

Maj Charles Frederick Taggart

Birth
Winchester, Winchester City, Virginia, USA
Death 24 Oct 1863 (aged 30)
Warrenton, Fauquier County, Virginia, USA
Burial Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania, USA
Plot Section G, Lot 222 & 224 West 1/2
Memorial ID 23310 · View Source
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Civil War Union Army Officer. Born in Winchester, Virginia, he was an 1852 graduate of the University of Pennsylvania. He was occupied as a merchant in Philadelphia, and was enrolled in the 1st Philadelphia City Troop on November 10, 1857. When the Civil War began in April 1861, the City Troop was mobilized for Federal service in response to the crisis, and from May to August 1861, they provided cavalry support in northern Virginia to the green troops that had been deployed in the area, going on reconnaissance, scouting and picket duty, and skirmishing with Confederate troops. When Charles F. Taggart and his comrades were mustered out of Federal service on August 17, 1861, they were highly praised by Colonel George H. Thomas (the future Major General) for their performance. He then had a hand in the recruitment and training of a new regiment, the 2nd Pennsylvania Volunteer Cavalry. Commissioned Major, Field and Staff, of the new unit on November 18, 1861, his new commanding officer, Colonel Richard Butler Price, had served as 1st Lieutenant in the City Troop during their time in Virginia, and the regiment’s chief surgeon was his older brother, Doctor William H. Taggart. After training first at Camp Patterson outside of Philadelphia, then in Washington, DC, the 2nd Pennsylvania would cross over the Potomac River into Virginia on June 27, 1862 and join the Army of the Potomac, with whom they would go on to participate in the 1862 Battles of 2nd Bull Run and Chantilly. In March-April 1863 he was in command of the cavalry garrison at Dranesville, Virginia, and his troopers were tasked to root out the successful Confederate guerilla Colonel John Singleton Mosby and his Rangers. Learning the partisan leader was at a nearby farm with 70 of his men, Major Taggart dispatched 150 men from the 1st Vermont Cavalry to capture Mosby. Despite having the element of surprise and superior numbers, the Vermonters were routed, and most of them captured by Colonel Mosby and his partisans. Major Taggart then sent out a force of 50 more men to pursue Mosby, but they failed to overtake the partisans. Soon afterwards he was assigned to the staff of Brigadier General Julius Stahel. After serving the July 1863 Battle of Gettysburg, Major Taggart and his men found themselves constantly in the field, scouting and skirmishing numerous times in northern Virginia. In the aftermath of the Union victory at Gettysburg and the subsequent escape of the Confederate Army under General Robert E. Lee into Virginia, the 2nd Pennsylvania Cavalry was sent with the rest of the Army in pursuit in the fall of 1863 in what became known as the Mine Run Campaign. On October 22, 1863 the regiment was detailed to picket the stretch of the Rappahannock River from Kelly's Ford, to Beverly Ford. They soon discovered Confederates consisting of two cavalry regiments and one infantry regiment destroying a nearby railroad track at Bealeton Station, and the unit’s 1st Battalion, under command of Major Taggart, charged the marauding rebels. At the head of the charge, Major Taggart was shot in the knee, and the skirmish culminated into a daylong firefight between the 2nd Pennsylvania and the Confederate forces, with the Confederates eventually being driven off. Major Taggart was brought to nearby Warrenton, where regimental surgeon Dr. William M. Weidman amputated his leg. However, it was not enough to save him, and he died of his wounds two days later. His remains were brought back to Philadelphia, and his funeral was held from his residence on 1610 Chestnut Street on Thursday, October 29th, with Episcopal services by the Reverend Kingston Goddard. Six members of the City Troop acted as pall bearers as the remains were conveyed to Laurel Hill Cemetery, and he was buried in the family plot in Section G, Lot Lot 222 & 224 West ½..


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  • Maintained by: Russ Dodge
  • Added: 25 Jul 2001
  • Find A Grave Memorial 23310
  • Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed ), memorial page for Maj Charles Frederick Taggart (3 May 1833–24 Oct 1863), Find A Grave Memorial no. 23310, citing Laurel Hill Cemetery, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania, USA ; Maintained by Russ Dodge (contributor 309) .