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John Evers “Rokked” Robinson

Birth
Kansas, USA
Death
14 May 1990 (aged 25)
New Haven, New Haven County, Connecticut, USA
Burial
Hamden, New Haven County, Connecticut, USA Add to Map
Plot
unmarked plot
Memorial ID
View Source
Friends bid goodbye to beloved 'Rokked'
NewspaperMarch 18, 1990 | New Haven Register (CT)

About 200 friends of John Evers Robinson, attending a memorial service at a Yale University chapel Saturday, hugged and openly wept for the man they affectionately called "Rokked," who died violently last week at the hands of an unknown assailant.

"John's friends were the texture of his life. He had the ability to touch a very rich assortment of lives. We are all shocked and saddened by his absence. We need him to help us deal with our grief," said Bob Osborne, who coached Robinson in the New Haven Youth Soccer League about eight years ago.

"New Haven had three famous rocks - East Rock, West Rock and Rokked," (a symbol for his involvement in rock music pronounced rockhead), said Ben Fussiner, who referred to Robinson as his brother, teacher and protector.

Robinson, 24, was found dead Wednesday in a room in an office building at 178 Temple St., where he had been staying and rehearsing. His skull had been crushed by several blows from a blunt instrument, according to the state medical examiner.

"J.R. had a gift of making you love him whether you wanted to or not," Osborne said.

A vase of flowers nestled in front of a red guitar served as a somber reminder of Robinson's love and close relationship with his music. Robinson played guitar for an underground rock band named Sold on Murder.

As guitarists Josh Gubitz and Claude Cahn, both of New Haven, played "Wish You Were Here" by Pink Floyd, and sang the wishful lyrics to their departed friend, loud sobs could be heard throughout the small chapel with few dry eyes left in the crowd.

Struggling with the words and fighting back the tears, Anna Myer of Boston said she had come to "dance with John today." Moving gracefully to the music of Bach, Myer performed an emotional ballet.

"John danced to the often frenzied rhythms of life daily. He swept us along with his emotions. We're still waiting for his smile. We're still stunned and angered by his absence," Osborne said.

"Many might have done more to help John be as kind to his own future as he was to ours. The city of New Haven needs to build a more peaceful city which means more responsibility for all of us," said Douglas Rae, the city's chief administrative officer.

Mayor John C. Daniels led the people in prayer. "On behalf of the entire city, we mourn his death with you," Daniels said.

Robinson's mother, from Wichita, Kan., speaking briefly to the group, said she finally learned the meaning of real love after meeting the people of New Haven, who deeply cared about her son.
Friends bid goodbye to beloved 'Rokked'
NewspaperMarch 18, 1990 | New Haven Register (CT)

About 200 friends of John Evers Robinson, attending a memorial service at a Yale University chapel Saturday, hugged and openly wept for the man they affectionately called "Rokked," who died violently last week at the hands of an unknown assailant.

"John's friends were the texture of his life. He had the ability to touch a very rich assortment of lives. We are all shocked and saddened by his absence. We need him to help us deal with our grief," said Bob Osborne, who coached Robinson in the New Haven Youth Soccer League about eight years ago.

"New Haven had three famous rocks - East Rock, West Rock and Rokked," (a symbol for his involvement in rock music pronounced rockhead), said Ben Fussiner, who referred to Robinson as his brother, teacher and protector.

Robinson, 24, was found dead Wednesday in a room in an office building at 178 Temple St., where he had been staying and rehearsing. His skull had been crushed by several blows from a blunt instrument, according to the state medical examiner.

"J.R. had a gift of making you love him whether you wanted to or not," Osborne said.

A vase of flowers nestled in front of a red guitar served as a somber reminder of Robinson's love and close relationship with his music. Robinson played guitar for an underground rock band named Sold on Murder.

As guitarists Josh Gubitz and Claude Cahn, both of New Haven, played "Wish You Were Here" by Pink Floyd, and sang the wishful lyrics to their departed friend, loud sobs could be heard throughout the small chapel with few dry eyes left in the crowd.

Struggling with the words and fighting back the tears, Anna Myer of Boston said she had come to "dance with John today." Moving gracefully to the music of Bach, Myer performed an emotional ballet.

"John danced to the often frenzied rhythms of life daily. He swept us along with his emotions. We're still waiting for his smile. We're still stunned and angered by his absence," Osborne said.

"Many might have done more to help John be as kind to his own future as he was to ours. The city of New Haven needs to build a more peaceful city which means more responsibility for all of us," said Douglas Rae, the city's chief administrative officer.

Mayor John C. Daniels led the people in prayer. "On behalf of the entire city, we mourn his death with you," Daniels said.

Robinson's mother, from Wichita, Kan., speaking briefly to the group, said she finally learned the meaning of real love after meeting the people of New Haven, who deeply cared about her son.

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