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Henrietta <I>Rogers</I> Standage

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Henrietta Rogers Standage

Birth
Portage County, Ohio, USA
Death
11 Oct 1898 (aged 66)
Mesa, Maricopa County, Arizona, USA
Burial
Mesa, Maricopa County, Arizona, USA GPS-Latitude: 33.4377375, Longitude: -111.831665
Plot
Section 50, Lot 4, Grave 4
Memorial ID
View Source
Daughter of Noah Rogers and Eda Hollister

Married Henry M. Standage, 16 Apr 1851, Salt Lake City, Salt, Utah

Children - John Standage, William Noah Standage, Orpha Ascenath Standage, Josephine Henrietta Standage, Joseph Rogers Standage, John James Standage, Eda Elizabeth Standage, Matilda Augusta Standage, Sophronia Armenia Standage, Sarah Caroline Standage, Hannah Marina Standage

History - Henrietta Rogers, wife of Henry Standage (of the Mormon Battalion), daughter of Noah Rogers (one of the first missionaries to the Sandwich Islands) and Eda Hollister Rogers.

Henrietta was born in Shelersville, Portage County, Ohio. She was born at the time the Church was so early in its development that she shared all their experiences of hardship and persecutions. She was baptized in Nauvoo and in 1848 she started with her parents for Utah. At Mount Pisgah her father died and is buried there. He knew that he was going to die and he dreaded the thought of being buried without a coffin; so he said to his sons, "See those large trees up on that mountain" When I die go and peel off the bark and wrap me up in them" They promised to do so, but they got an old wagon box:, that had been left by a company that had gone the year before in 1847. They made coffin for their father from the box.

Now, before leaving Nauvoo, her father had made two boxes to fit across the width of the wagon, which he filled with flour. He had a wife and seven sons and two daughters. He wanted to support his large family and bring all the bread stuff he could. Just before the company started, orders were given for those that had flour to divide with those that had none, or very little; so her father gave half of what he had.

They arrived in Salt Lake in 1851. Henrietta and her sisters worked out for other people. Their brothers worked whenever they could also. Their flour gave out and they lived on Sego roots and mustard greens or whatever else they could find to eat. They went for a long time without tasting bread. One day a young man, who was living with Brother Snow's family, came to visit their home. He saw how they were living. He, himself, was living on rations of two biscuits a day. He went home and saved his share of bread and stole one biscuit from each of the rest of the family, slipping them inside his jumper (jacket). He saved them until he had enough for one apiece for the Rogers family. He did not eat any breakfast that morning and when asked the reason why, he said he was not hungry... He left the house and came to the Roger's home, and gave the bread he had stolen and saved by going without eating. Henrietta's mother, Eda, said that was the sweetest bread she had ever eaten; and spoke of it often afterwards.

Brother Snow's family missed the bread and upon investigation, they found out what the young man had done. Brother Snow got some flour for the Rogers family. They never went without bread after that. It was only 25 pounds of flour and when they reached the last mixing, it stayed that way. Henrietta's mother would say, "Well one more batch and then we'll be out." But there was always some left, and they never went without flour again. This was a great blessing from the Lord.

Henrietta, the other girls, and their mother had only one calico dress apiece and the boys had only one shirt apiece. Every Saturday night the mother had them all go to bed. Then she would wash and iron their clothes, so they could all go to Sunday School and meeting the next day. The boys did not have any underwear and the girls had very little.

Henrietta was 18 years old when she came to Utah. She worked for Henry Standage's first wife and that is the way that she and he became acquainted. She married Henry Standage in 1851 and became his second wife. Henry was one of the Mormon Battalion and also had been a member of the Nauvoo Legion. He had left his first wife and his mother without a place to live at Winter Quarters, when he went with the Battalion. Henry passed through all those hardships and went without eating. Many times they (the men of the Battalion) were so hungry they scrambled and fought for the pork rinds thrown out of the Captains tent into the sand. They were thankful when they could get them to chew on as they went along. They boiled the cinches from their saddles to eat. When they did get meat it was often alive with maggots and bugs.

Henrietta's oldest child, William Noah, was born 23 January 1852, in Salt Lake City. Then when the Saints moved to Springville, her second child, Eda Elizabeth was born 30 May 1853. They then moved to Ogden and helped to settle that place. Her third child, Hannah Marina, was born 8 November 1854; and also her next girl, Sarah Caroline, was born there, 26 September 1856.

The family then moved to Brigham City and helped to settle that place. Henry, her husband, was one of the workers on the first court house in Brigham City. They went through al the trials that the Saints passed through in these places. While in Brigham City, there was trouble with the Indians and an Indian drew his knife on Henrietta because she had no bread to give him. She was badly frightened and after her baby was born she still would faint if she saw anyone draw a knife, even if she knew they were only acting and not threatening her.

She gave birth to a daughter, Sophronia Atmenia, 17 September 1858. In 1860 they were called to go to Richmond and settle that place. That fall in a one room log house Henry and his two wives lived together. Before the house was finished Henrietta gave birth to Sophia Ascent 1 October 1860. Their house was on what is called the Public Square or where the large Tabernacle now stands.

Henrietta helped to fight the grasshoppers and crickets and worked outside raising garden stuff. She picked, washed, corded and spun what wool she could get. She wove all kinds of jeans for the men and blankets for their beds; flannel and lindsay for dresses, knit all their stockings and went through many trials and hardships up there besides the trouble with the Indians. Just before Orpha was born an Indian drew his gun on Henrietta and gave her another scare.

The family remained in Richmond and continued their family there. They had a pair of twins, Josephine Henrietta and Joseph Roger born 28 October 1862: another daughter Matilda Augusta born 8 June 1865 and a son John James born 10 April 1868.

The first store in Brigham City was a co-op store. It was started in one comer of their home. Henry was the ward clerk and manager of the store. He held that position until 1880, when he was called to leave Richmond and go to Arizona. They went by wagon and were three months on the road. They had to leave part of their wagons and thing on the desert, and when they went back for them, the wagons had been ransacked and every thing taken.

They helped to settle Mesa, Arizona area. Henry built the first log house in Mesa. Two married daughters remained in Utah. Henrietta joined the Relief Society in the Alma Ward and in 1883 was called to act as first counselor. She was faithful member and attended to every duty given her. She was always on hand to help relieve the sick and those in distress. As was stated by her Bishop Alexander Hunsaker, and all who spoke at her funeral, "Sister Standage, as a living member, was faithful to every duty and calling." From age experience and good works she has gone to her rest as a veteran in the Church of God leaving a Veteran's husband, eight children and forty-four grandchildren and four great grandchildren, to bear her name with honor and blessing through all generations of time.

A song cartage of kindred and friends followed her remains to the grave, toward the reunion of loved ones in the Sweet Bye and Bye. "Dearest Mother thou hast left us and the loss we deeply feel. But tis God that has bereft us, He can all our sorrows heal, Yet again we hope to meet thee when the day of life is fled there in heaven with joy to greet thee where no farewell tears are shed." She died at age 66 years and 4 months of female troubles.
Daughter of Noah Rogers and Eda Hollister

Married Henry M. Standage, 16 Apr 1851, Salt Lake City, Salt, Utah

Children - John Standage, William Noah Standage, Orpha Ascenath Standage, Josephine Henrietta Standage, Joseph Rogers Standage, John James Standage, Eda Elizabeth Standage, Matilda Augusta Standage, Sophronia Armenia Standage, Sarah Caroline Standage, Hannah Marina Standage

History - Henrietta Rogers, wife of Henry Standage (of the Mormon Battalion), daughter of Noah Rogers (one of the first missionaries to the Sandwich Islands) and Eda Hollister Rogers.

Henrietta was born in Shelersville, Portage County, Ohio. She was born at the time the Church was so early in its development that she shared all their experiences of hardship and persecutions. She was baptized in Nauvoo and in 1848 she started with her parents for Utah. At Mount Pisgah her father died and is buried there. He knew that he was going to die and he dreaded the thought of being buried without a coffin; so he said to his sons, "See those large trees up on that mountain" When I die go and peel off the bark and wrap me up in them" They promised to do so, but they got an old wagon box:, that had been left by a company that had gone the year before in 1847. They made coffin for their father from the box.

Now, before leaving Nauvoo, her father had made two boxes to fit across the width of the wagon, which he filled with flour. He had a wife and seven sons and two daughters. He wanted to support his large family and bring all the bread stuff he could. Just before the company started, orders were given for those that had flour to divide with those that had none, or very little; so her father gave half of what he had.

They arrived in Salt Lake in 1851. Henrietta and her sisters worked out for other people. Their brothers worked whenever they could also. Their flour gave out and they lived on Sego roots and mustard greens or whatever else they could find to eat. They went for a long time without tasting bread. One day a young man, who was living with Brother Snow's family, came to visit their home. He saw how they were living. He, himself, was living on rations of two biscuits a day. He went home and saved his share of bread and stole one biscuit from each of the rest of the family, slipping them inside his jumper (jacket). He saved them until he had enough for one apiece for the Rogers family. He did not eat any breakfast that morning and when asked the reason why, he said he was not hungry... He left the house and came to the Roger's home, and gave the bread he had stolen and saved by going without eating. Henrietta's mother, Eda, said that was the sweetest bread she had ever eaten; and spoke of it often afterwards.

Brother Snow's family missed the bread and upon investigation, they found out what the young man had done. Brother Snow got some flour for the Rogers family. They never went without bread after that. It was only 25 pounds of flour and when they reached the last mixing, it stayed that way. Henrietta's mother would say, "Well one more batch and then we'll be out." But there was always some left, and they never went without flour again. This was a great blessing from the Lord.

Henrietta, the other girls, and their mother had only one calico dress apiece and the boys had only one shirt apiece. Every Saturday night the mother had them all go to bed. Then she would wash and iron their clothes, so they could all go to Sunday School and meeting the next day. The boys did not have any underwear and the girls had very little.

Henrietta was 18 years old when she came to Utah. She worked for Henry Standage's first wife and that is the way that she and he became acquainted. She married Henry Standage in 1851 and became his second wife. Henry was one of the Mormon Battalion and also had been a member of the Nauvoo Legion. He had left his first wife and his mother without a place to live at Winter Quarters, when he went with the Battalion. Henry passed through all those hardships and went without eating. Many times they (the men of the Battalion) were so hungry they scrambled and fought for the pork rinds thrown out of the Captains tent into the sand. They were thankful when they could get them to chew on as they went along. They boiled the cinches from their saddles to eat. When they did get meat it was often alive with maggots and bugs.

Henrietta's oldest child, William Noah, was born 23 January 1852, in Salt Lake City. Then when the Saints moved to Springville, her second child, Eda Elizabeth was born 30 May 1853. They then moved to Ogden and helped to settle that place. Her third child, Hannah Marina, was born 8 November 1854; and also her next girl, Sarah Caroline, was born there, 26 September 1856.

The family then moved to Brigham City and helped to settle that place. Henry, her husband, was one of the workers on the first court house in Brigham City. They went through al the trials that the Saints passed through in these places. While in Brigham City, there was trouble with the Indians and an Indian drew his knife on Henrietta because she had no bread to give him. She was badly frightened and after her baby was born she still would faint if she saw anyone draw a knife, even if she knew they were only acting and not threatening her.

She gave birth to a daughter, Sophronia Atmenia, 17 September 1858. In 1860 they were called to go to Richmond and settle that place. That fall in a one room log house Henry and his two wives lived together. Before the house was finished Henrietta gave birth to Sophia Ascent 1 October 1860. Their house was on what is called the Public Square or where the large Tabernacle now stands.

Henrietta helped to fight the grasshoppers and crickets and worked outside raising garden stuff. She picked, washed, corded and spun what wool she could get. She wove all kinds of jeans for the men and blankets for their beds; flannel and lindsay for dresses, knit all their stockings and went through many trials and hardships up there besides the trouble with the Indians. Just before Orpha was born an Indian drew his gun on Henrietta and gave her another scare.

The family remained in Richmond and continued their family there. They had a pair of twins, Josephine Henrietta and Joseph Roger born 28 October 1862: another daughter Matilda Augusta born 8 June 1865 and a son John James born 10 April 1868.

The first store in Brigham City was a co-op store. It was started in one comer of their home. Henry was the ward clerk and manager of the store. He held that position until 1880, when he was called to leave Richmond and go to Arizona. They went by wagon and were three months on the road. They had to leave part of their wagons and thing on the desert, and when they went back for them, the wagons had been ransacked and every thing taken.

They helped to settle Mesa, Arizona area. Henry built the first log house in Mesa. Two married daughters remained in Utah. Henrietta joined the Relief Society in the Alma Ward and in 1883 was called to act as first counselor. She was faithful member and attended to every duty given her. She was always on hand to help relieve the sick and those in distress. As was stated by her Bishop Alexander Hunsaker, and all who spoke at her funeral, "Sister Standage, as a living member, was faithful to every duty and calling." From age experience and good works she has gone to her rest as a veteran in the Church of God leaving a Veteran's husband, eight children and forty-four grandchildren and four great grandchildren, to bear her name with honor and blessing through all generations of time.

A song cartage of kindred and friends followed her remains to the grave, toward the reunion of loved ones in the Sweet Bye and Bye. "Dearest Mother thou hast left us and the loss we deeply feel. But tis God that has bereft us, He can all our sorrows heal, Yet again we hope to meet thee when the day of life is fled there in heaven with joy to greet thee where no farewell tears are shed." She died at age 66 years and 4 months of female troubles.


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  • Created by: SMS
  • Added: Oct 24, 2007
  • Find a Grave Memorial ID:
  • Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/22427416/henrietta-standage: accessed ), memorial page for Henrietta Rogers Standage (30 May 1832–11 Oct 1898), Find a Grave Memorial ID 22427416, citing City of Mesa Cemetery, Mesa, Maricopa County, Arizona, USA; Maintained by SMS (contributor 46491005).