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 Charles Nash Robinson
Cenotaph

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Charles Nash Robinson

Birth
Manhattan, Riley County, Kansas, USA
Death
29 Aug 1898 (aged 29)
Utuado, Utuado Municipality, Puerto Rico, USA
Cenotaph
Manhattan, Riley County, Kansas, USA
Memorial ID
222669807 View Source

Note: THIS IS A CENOTAPH.
A stone in Sunset Cemetery in Manhattan, Kansas, indicates he was buried in Arlington National Cemetery, Virginia. His obituary indicates he was buried in Utuado, Puerto Rico, after his death there of typhoid fever while serving as a soldier in the Spanish-American War.

Charles Nash Robinson was born February 20, 1869, in Manhattan, Kansas, to Thomas Jefferson Robinson, Sr., and Mary Elmira Burnell. His father was a physician who came to Manhattan in 1867 with his bride. Charles was married September 20, 1888, to Nellie Augusta Johnson in Manhattan, Kansas. They had two children: Prudence Robinson (1889-1985) and Oscar Charles Robinson (1895-1986).

OBITUARY printed in the Manhattan Nationalist (Manhattan, Kansas), Friday, November 25, 1898, Page 6.

DEATH OF CHARLES NASH ROBINSON
After so long a time, Dr. Robinson has received official notification of the death of his son, Charles N. Robinson, who died of typhoid fever at Utuado, Puerto Rico, August 28, 1898.

Capt. C. B. Hoppin, commanding Troop B, 2nd U. S. Cav., to which young Robinson belonged, writes to his father from Ponce, Nov. 8, received here the 21st.

"It has been a regret to me that I was unable to communicate with his friends at once, but it was impossible. His handbook in which addresses of soldier's relatives are entered was, I presume, taken with him to the hospital and among other things burned for fear of contagion, as we could find no trace of it in the Troop.

"During the time Blacksmith Robinson was with the Troop, he was an excellent man and a good soldier, and from what I knew of him, I can well appreciate that the home folks have been very anxious in regard to him.

"Robinson was buried in the cemetery at Utuado, and his grave marked with a headstone upon which his name, rank, and date of death was engraved by a member of the Troop. I most sincerely regret that the news I have to communicate is so sad in its character.

"This handbook was afterward found at Fort Logan, Colorado, by breaking open his locker, when news reached there that it could not be found with the Troop. When marching orders came to the 2d Cav., April 17, the haste with which the Troop must be "shod up" accounts sufficiently for the oversight which has resulted in such painful delay.

"It was like "Charley" to think last of himself and all who knew him can readily believe the many assurances these friends have received that he is mourned and missed not only by officers and comrades in his Troop but by many friends and acquaintances in this vicinity where he was so well known."

Note: THIS IS A CENOTAPH.
A stone in Sunset Cemetery in Manhattan, Kansas, indicates he was buried in Arlington National Cemetery, Virginia. His obituary indicates he was buried in Utuado, Puerto Rico, after his death there of typhoid fever while serving as a soldier in the Spanish-American War.

Charles Nash Robinson was born February 20, 1869, in Manhattan, Kansas, to Thomas Jefferson Robinson, Sr., and Mary Elmira Burnell. His father was a physician who came to Manhattan in 1867 with his bride. Charles was married September 20, 1888, to Nellie Augusta Johnson in Manhattan, Kansas. They had two children: Prudence Robinson (1889-1985) and Oscar Charles Robinson (1895-1986).

OBITUARY printed in the Manhattan Nationalist (Manhattan, Kansas), Friday, November 25, 1898, Page 6.

DEATH OF CHARLES NASH ROBINSON
After so long a time, Dr. Robinson has received official notification of the death of his son, Charles N. Robinson, who died of typhoid fever at Utuado, Puerto Rico, August 28, 1898.

Capt. C. B. Hoppin, commanding Troop B, 2nd U. S. Cav., to which young Robinson belonged, writes to his father from Ponce, Nov. 8, received here the 21st.

"It has been a regret to me that I was unable to communicate with his friends at once, but it was impossible. His handbook in which addresses of soldier's relatives are entered was, I presume, taken with him to the hospital and among other things burned for fear of contagion, as we could find no trace of it in the Troop.

"During the time Blacksmith Robinson was with the Troop, he was an excellent man and a good soldier, and from what I knew of him, I can well appreciate that the home folks have been very anxious in regard to him.

"Robinson was buried in the cemetery at Utuado, and his grave marked with a headstone upon which his name, rank, and date of death was engraved by a member of the Troop. I most sincerely regret that the news I have to communicate is so sad in its character.

"This handbook was afterward found at Fort Logan, Colorado, by breaking open his locker, when news reached there that it could not be found with the Troop. When marching orders came to the 2d Cav., April 17, the haste with which the Troop must be "shod up" accounts sufficiently for the oversight which has resulted in such painful delay.

"It was like "Charley" to think last of himself and all who knew him can readily believe the many assurances these friends have received that he is mourned and missed not only by officers and comrades in his Troop but by many friends and acquaintances in this vicinity where he was so well known."


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