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 Malcolm Hulke

Malcolm Hulke

Birth
Hampstead, London Borough of Camden, Greater London, England
Death 6 Jul 1979 (aged 54)
Cambridge, City of Cambridge, Cambridgeshire, England
Burial Girton, South Cambridgeshire District, Cambridgeshire, England
Plot Ashes Taken Away - Location Unknown
Memorial ID 22224 · View Source
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Screenwriter, Novelist. Born to a single mother in an era that was not accepting of such, there was no record made of his birth, a fact that became inconvenient later. He served in the military during the Second World War, and after demobilization joined the Communist Party of Great Britain. He made his debut as a professional writer with the television series “Television Playwright” with the episode “This Day in Fear” in 1958. In 1960 he wrote the series of six episodes for the program “Project Luna,” gaining him recognition. He was picked up by the “Pathfinder” series, writing multiple episodes for Pathfinders in Space, to Mars, and to Venus between 1960 and 1961. He wrote for several series in the coming decade, including “Ghost Squad,” “Gideon C.I.D.” “United,” and “The Avengers” written between 1962 and 1964. His most notable contributions, however, were probably to the cult series “Doctor Who.” In 1967, he debuted with the six episode arc, “The Faceless Ones,” with David Ellis, for the Second Doctor. This was followed by the ten episode arc, “The War Games,” which, for the first time, explained the Doctor's origins and introduced the Time Lords. He also introduced the Silurian race with his next outing; “Doctor Who and the Silurians,” a seven episode arc in 1970 and then their cousins, “The Sea Devils,” a six episode arc in 1972 for the Third Doctor. All told, he authored 53 episodes, the last of which were the six episodes of “Invasion of the Dinosaurs” in 1974. He also contributed to Target Books' series of Doctor Who novelizations, adapting all but one of his scripts including "Doctor Who and the Cave-Monsters" (1974), "Doctor Who and the Doomsday Weapon" (1974), "Doctor Who and the Sea-Devils" (1974), "Doctor Who and the Dinosaur Invasion" (1976), "Doctor Who and the Space War" (1976). His novelizations were noted for their wealth of added background detail and character depth. Additionally, a colleague suggested that one could find a political subtext in everything he wrote. He died soon after completing his novelization of "Doctor Who and the War Games" (1979).

Bio by: Iola


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  • Maintained by: Find A Grave
  • Added: 16 May 2001
  • Find A Grave Memorial 22224
  • Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed ), memorial page for Malcolm Hulke (21 Nov 1924–6 Jul 1979), Find A Grave Memorial no. 22224, citing Cambridge City Crematorium, Girton, South Cambridgeshire District, Cambridgeshire, England ; Maintained by Find A Grave .