Elizabeth <I>Hoffman</I> Back

Elizabeth Hoffman Back

Birth
Madison County, Virginia, USA
Death
1815 (aged 68–69)
Rockingham County, Virginia, USA
Burial
Elkton, Rockingham County, Virginia, USA
Memorial ID
218340050 View Source

DO NOT MERGE THIS MEMORIAL WITH ANY OTHER MEMORIAL. IT IS NOT A DUPLICATE OF ANY OTHER MEMORIAL. DEVIOUS PEOPLE KEEP TRYING TO STEAL MY MEMORIALS, BUT THE MANAGERS AT FINDAGRAVE HAVE STOPPED IT, AND THEY WILL CONTINUE TO STOP IT. THE GENEALOGY SHOWN HERE IS ACCURATE & PROVEN…PLEASE STOP TRYING TO DESTROY IT.

THIS MEMORIAL IS NOT A DUPLICATE OF #20965011.
PLEASE DO NOT MERGE THEM.

IN FACT, MEMORIAL #20965011 IS A FAKE GRAVESTONE. IT WAS CREATED IN 1998, IN ORDER TO SELL A FRAUDULENT GENEALOGY BOOK ABOUT THE BACK (BACH) FAMILY IN SOUTHEASTERN KENTUCKY. THE WOMAN DESCRIBED ON THAT FAKE GRAVESTONE IS NOT THE WOMAN WHO IS ACTUALLY BURIED UNDERNEATH IT.


Many years ago, a fraudulent genealogy of this Back family was created by "The Back-Bach Genealogical Society," which was a small group of people in southeastern Kentucky. They formed that little club, for the sole purpose of creating that fraudulent genealogy. Oddly enough, not one of them was a genealogist. Even more strange was the fact that every one of them already knew the actual genealogy of their own family, and so they knew full well that the genealogy they were creating was fraudulent. So, why did they do it?

Well, they thought that they would make a lot of money by creating a connection between their Back (Bach) family in southeastern Kentucky, and a man named Harman Back, who was an immigrant from Freudenberg, Germany. That's because Harman Back was one of the early German immigrants being researched by The Germanna Foundation, which was an organization that made a tremendous amount of money selling genealogy. So, the people in "The Back-Bach Genealogical Society" thought that, if they could somehow connect their family to Harman Back, they could made a tremendous amount of money as well.

They published their fraudulent genealogy, in a big, orange book, in 1994. It falsely claimed that Henry Back (1743-1809), who was the husband of Elizabeth Hoffman Back (born 1746), and his brother John Back (1738-1794), were sons of Harman Back, even though there was not one piece of evidence in their book (or anywhere else) to prove it.

They also claimed that Henry Back (1743-1809) and his wife Elizabeth Hoffman Back (born 1746) had two sons that they never had: John Back (1774-1853) and Henry Back (1785-1871). They further claimed that, after Henry died, in 1809, his widow Elizabeth, and those two sons (that they never had) migrated to southeastern Kentucky and founded the Back (Bach) family there. But all of that was completely false.

Here is the truth: Henry Back (1743-1809), and his brother John Back (1738-1794), were not the sons of Harman Back. And Henry Back (1743-1809) and his wife Elizabeth Hoffman Back (born 1746) did not have those two sons: John Back (1774-1853) and Henry Back (1785-1871). And after Henry died, in 1809, his widow Elizabeth did not migrate to southeastern Kentucky; she never went to Kentucky.

Henry Back (1743-1809) and his wife, Elizabeth Hoffman Back (born 1746), did have sons named John and Henry, but they were two different men. Their son John was born in 1776; and their son Henry (Henry Jr.) was born in 1783; they never went to Kentucky either.

John Back (1774-1853) and his brother Henry Back (1785-1871) were actually the sons of Joseph Back (1745-1819) and his wife, Elizabeth Hoffman-Maggard Back (1755-1826).

And it was Joseph Back (1745-1819), his wife Elizabeth Hoffman-Maggard Back (1755-1826), and their children, including John Back (1774-1853) and Henry Back (1785-1871), who actually migrated to southeastern Kentucky and founded the Back (Bach) family there.

Joseph Back (1745-1819) was actually the brother of Henry Back (1743-1809) and John Back (1738-1794). Please see the memorials for Joseph Back and his wife, Elizabeth Hoffman-Maggard Back: Joseph Back and Elizabeth Hoffman-Maggard Back.

****************
As stated above, "The Back-Bach Genealogical Society" published their fraudulent genealogy book, in 1994. In order to make their fraudulent genealogy seem more likely to be true, they actually spent several years, destroying evidence of the actual genealogy of their own family. It sounds impossible to believe, but it is most definitely true.

In the fall of 1988, they went to The Maggard Cemetery, in Partridge, Kentucky, to get rid of a huge piece of evidence, which was the gravestone of Elizabeth Hoffman-Maggard Back (1755-1826).

Elizabeth Hoffman-Maggard Back (1755-1826) was the actual matriarch of the Back (Bach) family in southeastern Kentucky, and members of "The Back-Bach Genealogical Society" knew that. She had come to Kentucky, in 1791, with her husband Joseph Back (1745-1819), and their children, including John Back (1774-1853) and Henry Back (1785-1871). When she died, she was buried next to a tree, not far from the Poor Fork of the Cumberland River. Shortly after that, The Maggard Cemetery was created, around her grave. It was named The Maggard Cemetery, because Elizabeth had been raised by the Maggard family, and so the Back family had always been very close to the Maggard family.

Because the fraudulent genealogy that was created by "The Back-Bach Genealogical Society" claimed that Elizabeth Hoffman Back (born 1746) was the matriarch of the Back (Bach) family in southeastern Kentucky, and had migrated there, in 1809, they "simply had to get rid of" the gravestone of Elizabeth Hoffman-Maggard Back (1755-1826), because it was proof of the actual genealogy of the family.

So they actually pulled her gravestone up, from the ground, and then they threw it over the hill! She was their own great, great grandmother!

Then they put that fake gravestone, which they had recently made, which described Elizabeth Hoffman Back (born 1746), on top of the remains of Elizabeth Hoffman-Maggard Back (1755-1826), their own great-great grandmother! That is the fake gravestone on Memorial #20965011. The fake gravestone has Elizabeth Hoffman Back's year of death as 1832, which is incorrect as well.

Afterwards, they claimed that their newly-erected fake gravestone "proved" that their fraudulent genealogy was correct! One of the authors of that fraudulent genealogy book, Custer Back, even bragged, in an article that he wrote, for the Filson Club History Quarterly, that they were going to "replace" that gravestone. That article is attached to this memorial.

That fake gravestone is still there today. It is absolutely immoral that it is still sitting on top of the remains of the woman who is actually buried there.
****************


Here is the actual genealogy of Elizabeth Hoffman Back (born 1746): She was born on July 13, 1746, one of the many children of John Hoffman and his second wife, Maria Sabina Folg. The family lived along the Robinson River, in what is now Madison County, Virginia. When Elizabeth was born, that land was in the southern part of Orange County; it became the far southern part of Culpeper County in 1749; and it became Madison County, in 1792.

Her father, John Hoffman, kept a Family Bible, in which he wrote down the names and dates of birth of all of his children. (He also wrote down his name and date of birth, and the names and dates of birth of both of his wives). He wrote down Elizabeth's date of birth (July 13, 1746), which has been documented in many sources; one of which is attached to this memorial.

Her father, John Hoffman, was a very wealthy and very prominent man; he owned 3,525 acres of land around that part of the Robinson River. When he died, in 1772, he left land to all of his children, including his daughters (which was somewhat unusual, back then). Each daughter received 150 acres.

Around 1775, Elizabeth married Henry Back (1743-1809). He was the son of one of their nearest neighbors, John Henry Back, who lived along Crooked Creek (also known as Meander Run), near where it flowed into the Robinson River. Elizabeth's sister Margaret married John Back (1738-1794), who was Henry's brother. It may have been a double wedding.

It is important to understand that, back in those days, social and economic standing were strong considerations, when it came to marriage. Someone of John Hoffman's prominence and wealth would never have permitted his daughters to marry men who were poor, and who came from families without significant social standing. John Henry Back was a highly-respected millwright in that part of Virginia, and he owned 786 acres of land, adjacent (or very close) to John Hoffman. John Henry Back was also the grandson of Johann Christoph Bach (1642-1703), who was a well-known composer and musician, back in Germany; in fact, his first cousin (once removed) was the highly-acclaimed composer and musician, Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750), who was celebrated around the world. Therefore, John Henry Back was certainly in the same social and economic arena as John Hoffman, and thus, his sons were worthy of marrying the daughters of John Hoffman.

At Christmastime of 1787, Elizabeth went to visit her father-in-law, John Henry Back, who lived nearby. She took her 2-month-old son Lewis with her (born October 14, 1787). Her husband Henry did not go with her; he must have been busy, working on their farm. At the time of Elizabeth's visit, her father-in-law was taking care of three of his grandchildren, for a couple of months; they were the three youngest children of his son Joseph. He was taking care of them while Joseph, his wife, Elizabeth Hoffman-Maggard, and their oldest son (Joseph Jr.) were over in Kentucky, checking on some land that Joseph was trying to buy. Joseph's three children were: John (born November 19, 1774); Mary (born November 1, 1777); and Henry (born February 6, 1785).

While Elizabeth was there, visiting with her father-in-law, he pulled out the Bach Family Bible, and he made an entry. He wrote down Elizabeth's name, and her date of birth (July 13, 1746); and then he wrote down the names and dates of birth of the four children who were there, in chronological order (John, Mary, Henry, and Lewis). A copy of that entry into the Bach Family Bible is attached to this memorial. NOTE: Many years later, around 1817, Joseph made an entry into the Bach Family Bible, right below this 1787 entry; he copied the name and date of birth for Lewis, and he added the name and date of birth for Alfred Back (born December 27, 1806), who was born to his daughter Mary.

That entry into the Bach Family Bible is extremely significant. It proves, beyond any doubt, that Elizabeth Hoffman Back (born on July 13, 1746), who was the daughter of John Hoffman, married into the family of John Henry Back, and not the family of Harman Back. Her name, and her exact date of birth, were written into both her father's Family Bible, and into the Family Bible owned by John Henry Back. This is undisputable proof that Elizabeth Hoffman Back's husband, Henry Back, was not the son of Harman Back; he was the son of John Henry Back.

The old Bach Family Bible is still in existence today. It is now at the Breathitt County Public Library, in Jackson, Kentucky. The Library Director, Dr. Stephen Bowling, has digitized each page, and has posted all the pages on the library's website, so you can see those pages online (on that website, click on page 292-293, to see that page from Christmastime of 1787). A copy of that page is also attached to this memorial.

Elizabeth Hoffman Back, and her husband Henry Back, lived on the 150-acre farm that she had inherited from her father, and they raised their children there. They had eight children: John (born 1776); Benjamin (born 1781); Joseph (born 1782); Henry (born 1783); Aaron (born June 18, 1785); Lewis (born October 14, 1787); and two daughters whose names and dates of birth are not known.

In 1794, Elizabeth's sister Margaret lost her husband John Back, who was the brother of Elizabeth's husband Henry. Several years later, in 1807, Margaret decided to leave Madison County, Virginia, and move about thirty-five miles away, to Rockingham County, to live on a farm that was owned by her daughter Elizabeth, and her husband John Embry. They had married in 1800, and they owned 100 acres, just east of the town of Elkton, along a creek called "Wolf Run." It is believed that 50 acres was on one side of the creek, and 50 acres was on the other side. It is suspected that John Embry and his wife lived on 50 acres, on one side of the creek, and so Margaret moved onto 50 acres, on the other side of the creek. Margaret took her three unmarried daughters with her.

Two years after that, Elizabeth's husband Henry died, in 1809. He died, sometime before April. On April 10, 1809, Elizabeth's son Aaron, and Elizabeth's sister Margaret, bought the entire 100 acres along Wolf Run, from Margaret's daughter Elizabeth and her husband John Embry. That land purchase included the 50 acres that Margaret was already living on; and the other 50 acres was for Aaron, his mother Elizabeth, and Elizabeth's two daughters (whose names are not known).

On September 28, 1809, Elizabeth sold her 150-acre farm in Madison County, to Ephraim Fray for $900 (Madison County Deed Book #4, p. 500). She then moved to Rockingham County, and settled along Wolf Run, with her son Aaron, and her two daughters. (It has been proven that Ephraim Fray lived in the part of Culpeper County that became Madison County in 1792, and also that he and his family lived in Bromfield Parish, which became the parish of Madison County in 1792. Please see the 1791 information about the will of Ephraim's father, John Fray, which proves that the Fray family lived in Bromfield Parish. Elizabeth's husband Henry was a witness to that will. That will is attached to Ephraim's memorial: Ephraim Fray).

Elizabeth Hoffman Back (born 1746), the daughter of John Hoffman and Maria Sabina Folg, and the widow of Henry Back (died 1809), was seen living in Rockingham County, in the 1810 Census Report, with her son Aaron Back, and her two daughters. That census report is attached to this memorial. There was only one man in early America named Aaron Back, which was her son. In that Census Report, Aaron's name was reported as being the head of the house, and Elizabeth was indicated in the 10th column, for females age 45 & older (she was then 64). They lived next door to Henry Hammer Sr. and his family; Aaron married their daughter, Margaret Elizabeth Luger Hammer, on March 9, 1811. (Aaron's wife went by her middle name of Elizabeth, as shown on their marriage record, which is attached to his memorial.)

Elizabeth Hoffman Back (born 1746) was also seen living in Rockingham County, in the 1810 Land Tax List, and in the 1810 Personal Property Tax List. Both listings were written as, "Aaron Back and mother." After Aaron got married in 1811, he moved off of Wolf Run. Elizabeth was then listed as "Elizabeth Back," in the 1815 Land Tax List. All three Tax Lists are attached to this memorial.

This 1810 Census Report, and these three Tax Lists, are absolute proof that Elizabeth Hoffman Back (born 1746), the daughter of John Hoffman and Maria Sabina Folg, and the widow of Henry Back (died 1809), never moved to Kentucky, after her husband Henry died. These documents prove that she moved to Rockingham County, Virginia, to live near her widowed sister Margaret.

It is believed that Elizabeth Hoffman Back died, either in late 1815, or early 1816. She was probably buried in an unmarked grave, in the nearby Elk Run Cemetery, where her son Aaron's in-laws would later be buried.

Shortly after Elizabeth died, her son Aaron and his wife Elizabeth (Margaret Elizabeth Luger Hammer Back), sold the 50 acres that Elizabeth had been living on (and where Aaron had first lived, when he arrived in Rockingham County), on August 20, 1816. That 1816 deed described how Aaron and his aunt (Margaret Hoffman Back) had bought that land, back on April 10, 1809. A copy of that deed is attached to this memorial.

Aaron, his wife, and their infant son, then left Rockingham County and migrated to Ohio. Elizabeth's sister Margaret continued to live on her 50 acres along Wolf Run, until she died, around 1831.

All of this information can be easily verified, and you are encouraged to do so.

DO NOT MERGE THIS MEMORIAL WITH ANY OTHER MEMORIAL. IT IS NOT A DUPLICATE OF ANY OTHER MEMORIAL. DEVIOUS PEOPLE KEEP TRYING TO STEAL MY MEMORIALS, BUT THE MANAGERS AT FINDAGRAVE HAVE STOPPED IT, AND THEY WILL CONTINUE TO STOP IT. THE GENEALOGY SHOWN HERE IS ACCURATE & PROVEN…PLEASE STOP TRYING TO DESTROY IT.

THIS MEMORIAL IS NOT A DUPLICATE OF #20965011.
PLEASE DO NOT MERGE THEM.

IN FACT, MEMORIAL #20965011 IS A FAKE GRAVESTONE. IT WAS CREATED IN 1998, IN ORDER TO SELL A FRAUDULENT GENEALOGY BOOK ABOUT THE BACK (BACH) FAMILY IN SOUTHEASTERN KENTUCKY. THE WOMAN DESCRIBED ON THAT FAKE GRAVESTONE IS NOT THE WOMAN WHO IS ACTUALLY BURIED UNDERNEATH IT.


Many years ago, a fraudulent genealogy of this Back family was created by "The Back-Bach Genealogical Society," which was a small group of people in southeastern Kentucky. They formed that little club, for the sole purpose of creating that fraudulent genealogy. Oddly enough, not one of them was a genealogist. Even more strange was the fact that every one of them already knew the actual genealogy of their own family, and so they knew full well that the genealogy they were creating was fraudulent. So, why did they do it?

Well, they thought that they would make a lot of money by creating a connection between their Back (Bach) family in southeastern Kentucky, and a man named Harman Back, who was an immigrant from Freudenberg, Germany. That's because Harman Back was one of the early German immigrants being researched by The Germanna Foundation, which was an organization that made a tremendous amount of money selling genealogy. So, the people in "The Back-Bach Genealogical Society" thought that, if they could somehow connect their family to Harman Back, they could made a tremendous amount of money as well.

They published their fraudulent genealogy, in a big, orange book, in 1994. It falsely claimed that Henry Back (1743-1809), who was the husband of Elizabeth Hoffman Back (born 1746), and his brother John Back (1738-1794), were sons of Harman Back, even though there was not one piece of evidence in their book (or anywhere else) to prove it.

They also claimed that Henry Back (1743-1809) and his wife Elizabeth Hoffman Back (born 1746) had two sons that they never had: John Back (1774-1853) and Henry Back (1785-1871). They further claimed that, after Henry died, in 1809, his widow Elizabeth, and those two sons (that they never had) migrated to southeastern Kentucky and founded the Back (Bach) family there. But all of that was completely false.

Here is the truth: Henry Back (1743-1809), and his brother John Back (1738-1794), were not the sons of Harman Back. And Henry Back (1743-1809) and his wife Elizabeth Hoffman Back (born 1746) did not have those two sons: John Back (1774-1853) and Henry Back (1785-1871). And after Henry died, in 1809, his widow Elizabeth did not migrate to southeastern Kentucky; she never went to Kentucky.

Henry Back (1743-1809) and his wife, Elizabeth Hoffman Back (born 1746), did have sons named John and Henry, but they were two different men. Their son John was born in 1776; and their son Henry (Henry Jr.) was born in 1783; they never went to Kentucky either.

John Back (1774-1853) and his brother Henry Back (1785-1871) were actually the sons of Joseph Back (1745-1819) and his wife, Elizabeth Hoffman-Maggard Back (1755-1826).

And it was Joseph Back (1745-1819), his wife Elizabeth Hoffman-Maggard Back (1755-1826), and their children, including John Back (1774-1853) and Henry Back (1785-1871), who actually migrated to southeastern Kentucky and founded the Back (Bach) family there.

Joseph Back (1745-1819) was actually the brother of Henry Back (1743-1809) and John Back (1738-1794). Please see the memorials for Joseph Back and his wife, Elizabeth Hoffman-Maggard Back: Joseph Back and Elizabeth Hoffman-Maggard Back.

****************
As stated above, "The Back-Bach Genealogical Society" published their fraudulent genealogy book, in 1994. In order to make their fraudulent genealogy seem more likely to be true, they actually spent several years, destroying evidence of the actual genealogy of their own family. It sounds impossible to believe, but it is most definitely true.

In the fall of 1988, they went to The Maggard Cemetery, in Partridge, Kentucky, to get rid of a huge piece of evidence, which was the gravestone of Elizabeth Hoffman-Maggard Back (1755-1826).

Elizabeth Hoffman-Maggard Back (1755-1826) was the actual matriarch of the Back (Bach) family in southeastern Kentucky, and members of "The Back-Bach Genealogical Society" knew that. She had come to Kentucky, in 1791, with her husband Joseph Back (1745-1819), and their children, including John Back (1774-1853) and Henry Back (1785-1871). When she died, she was buried next to a tree, not far from the Poor Fork of the Cumberland River. Shortly after that, The Maggard Cemetery was created, around her grave. It was named The Maggard Cemetery, because Elizabeth had been raised by the Maggard family, and so the Back family had always been very close to the Maggard family.

Because the fraudulent genealogy that was created by "The Back-Bach Genealogical Society" claimed that Elizabeth Hoffman Back (born 1746) was the matriarch of the Back (Bach) family in southeastern Kentucky, and had migrated there, in 1809, they "simply had to get rid of" the gravestone of Elizabeth Hoffman-Maggard Back (1755-1826), because it was proof of the actual genealogy of the family.

So they actually pulled her gravestone up, from the ground, and then they threw it over the hill! She was their own great, great grandmother!

Then they put that fake gravestone, which they had recently made, which described Elizabeth Hoffman Back (born 1746), on top of the remains of Elizabeth Hoffman-Maggard Back (1755-1826), their own great-great grandmother! That is the fake gravestone on Memorial #20965011. The fake gravestone has Elizabeth Hoffman Back's year of death as 1832, which is incorrect as well.

Afterwards, they claimed that their newly-erected fake gravestone "proved" that their fraudulent genealogy was correct! One of the authors of that fraudulent genealogy book, Custer Back, even bragged, in an article that he wrote, for the Filson Club History Quarterly, that they were going to "replace" that gravestone. That article is attached to this memorial.

That fake gravestone is still there today. It is absolutely immoral that it is still sitting on top of the remains of the woman who is actually buried there.
****************


Here is the actual genealogy of Elizabeth Hoffman Back (born 1746): She was born on July 13, 1746, one of the many children of John Hoffman and his second wife, Maria Sabina Folg. The family lived along the Robinson River, in what is now Madison County, Virginia. When Elizabeth was born, that land was in the southern part of Orange County; it became the far southern part of Culpeper County in 1749; and it became Madison County, in 1792.

Her father, John Hoffman, kept a Family Bible, in which he wrote down the names and dates of birth of all of his children. (He also wrote down his name and date of birth, and the names and dates of birth of both of his wives). He wrote down Elizabeth's date of birth (July 13, 1746), which has been documented in many sources; one of which is attached to this memorial.

Her father, John Hoffman, was a very wealthy and very prominent man; he owned 3,525 acres of land around that part of the Robinson River. When he died, in 1772, he left land to all of his children, including his daughters (which was somewhat unusual, back then). Each daughter received 150 acres.

Around 1775, Elizabeth married Henry Back (1743-1809). He was the son of one of their nearest neighbors, John Henry Back, who lived along Crooked Creek (also known as Meander Run), near where it flowed into the Robinson River. Elizabeth's sister Margaret married John Back (1738-1794), who was Henry's brother. It may have been a double wedding.

It is important to understand that, back in those days, social and economic standing were strong considerations, when it came to marriage. Someone of John Hoffman's prominence and wealth would never have permitted his daughters to marry men who were poor, and who came from families without significant social standing. John Henry Back was a highly-respected millwright in that part of Virginia, and he owned 786 acres of land, adjacent (or very close) to John Hoffman. John Henry Back was also the grandson of Johann Christoph Bach (1642-1703), who was a well-known composer and musician, back in Germany; in fact, his first cousin (once removed) was the highly-acclaimed composer and musician, Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750), who was celebrated around the world. Therefore, John Henry Back was certainly in the same social and economic arena as John Hoffman, and thus, his sons were worthy of marrying the daughters of John Hoffman.

At Christmastime of 1787, Elizabeth went to visit her father-in-law, John Henry Back, who lived nearby. She took her 2-month-old son Lewis with her (born October 14, 1787). Her husband Henry did not go with her; he must have been busy, working on their farm. At the time of Elizabeth's visit, her father-in-law was taking care of three of his grandchildren, for a couple of months; they were the three youngest children of his son Joseph. He was taking care of them while Joseph, his wife, Elizabeth Hoffman-Maggard, and their oldest son (Joseph Jr.) were over in Kentucky, checking on some land that Joseph was trying to buy. Joseph's three children were: John (born November 19, 1774); Mary (born November 1, 1777); and Henry (born February 6, 1785).

While Elizabeth was there, visiting with her father-in-law, he pulled out the Bach Family Bible, and he made an entry. He wrote down Elizabeth's name, and her date of birth (July 13, 1746); and then he wrote down the names and dates of birth of the four children who were there, in chronological order (John, Mary, Henry, and Lewis). A copy of that entry into the Bach Family Bible is attached to this memorial. NOTE: Many years later, around 1817, Joseph made an entry into the Bach Family Bible, right below this 1787 entry; he copied the name and date of birth for Lewis, and he added the name and date of birth for Alfred Back (born December 27, 1806), who was born to his daughter Mary.

That entry into the Bach Family Bible is extremely significant. It proves, beyond any doubt, that Elizabeth Hoffman Back (born on July 13, 1746), who was the daughter of John Hoffman, married into the family of John Henry Back, and not the family of Harman Back. Her name, and her exact date of birth, were written into both her father's Family Bible, and into the Family Bible owned by John Henry Back. This is undisputable proof that Elizabeth Hoffman Back's husband, Henry Back, was not the son of Harman Back; he was the son of John Henry Back.

The old Bach Family Bible is still in existence today. It is now at the Breathitt County Public Library, in Jackson, Kentucky. The Library Director, Dr. Stephen Bowling, has digitized each page, and has posted all the pages on the library's website, so you can see those pages online (on that website, click on page 292-293, to see that page from Christmastime of 1787). A copy of that page is also attached to this memorial.

Elizabeth Hoffman Back, and her husband Henry Back, lived on the 150-acre farm that she had inherited from her father, and they raised their children there. They had eight children: John (born 1776); Benjamin (born 1781); Joseph (born 1782); Henry (born 1783); Aaron (born June 18, 1785); Lewis (born October 14, 1787); and two daughters whose names and dates of birth are not known.

In 1794, Elizabeth's sister Margaret lost her husband John Back, who was the brother of Elizabeth's husband Henry. Several years later, in 1807, Margaret decided to leave Madison County, Virginia, and move about thirty-five miles away, to Rockingham County, to live on a farm that was owned by her daughter Elizabeth, and her husband John Embry. They had married in 1800, and they owned 100 acres, just east of the town of Elkton, along a creek called "Wolf Run." It is believed that 50 acres was on one side of the creek, and 50 acres was on the other side. It is suspected that John Embry and his wife lived on 50 acres, on one side of the creek, and so Margaret moved onto 50 acres, on the other side of the creek. Margaret took her three unmarried daughters with her.

Two years after that, Elizabeth's husband Henry died, in 1809. He died, sometime before April. On April 10, 1809, Elizabeth's son Aaron, and Elizabeth's sister Margaret, bought the entire 100 acres along Wolf Run, from Margaret's daughter Elizabeth and her husband John Embry. That land purchase included the 50 acres that Margaret was already living on; and the other 50 acres was for Aaron, his mother Elizabeth, and Elizabeth's two daughters (whose names are not known).

On September 28, 1809, Elizabeth sold her 150-acre farm in Madison County, to Ephraim Fray for $900 (Madison County Deed Book #4, p. 500). She then moved to Rockingham County, and settled along Wolf Run, with her son Aaron, and her two daughters. (It has been proven that Ephraim Fray lived in the part of Culpeper County that became Madison County in 1792, and also that he and his family lived in Bromfield Parish, which became the parish of Madison County in 1792. Please see the 1791 information about the will of Ephraim's father, John Fray, which proves that the Fray family lived in Bromfield Parish. Elizabeth's husband Henry was a witness to that will. That will is attached to Ephraim's memorial: Ephraim Fray).

Elizabeth Hoffman Back (born 1746), the daughter of John Hoffman and Maria Sabina Folg, and the widow of Henry Back (died 1809), was seen living in Rockingham County, in the 1810 Census Report, with her son Aaron Back, and her two daughters. That census report is attached to this memorial. There was only one man in early America named Aaron Back, which was her son. In that Census Report, Aaron's name was reported as being the head of the house, and Elizabeth was indicated in the 10th column, for females age 45 & older (she was then 64). They lived next door to Henry Hammer Sr. and his family; Aaron married their daughter, Margaret Elizabeth Luger Hammer, on March 9, 1811. (Aaron's wife went by her middle name of Elizabeth, as shown on their marriage record, which is attached to his memorial.)

Elizabeth Hoffman Back (born 1746) was also seen living in Rockingham County, in the 1810 Land Tax List, and in the 1810 Personal Property Tax List. Both listings were written as, "Aaron Back and mother." After Aaron got married in 1811, he moved off of Wolf Run. Elizabeth was then listed as "Elizabeth Back," in the 1815 Land Tax List. All three Tax Lists are attached to this memorial.

This 1810 Census Report, and these three Tax Lists, are absolute proof that Elizabeth Hoffman Back (born 1746), the daughter of John Hoffman and Maria Sabina Folg, and the widow of Henry Back (died 1809), never moved to Kentucky, after her husband Henry died. These documents prove that she moved to Rockingham County, Virginia, to live near her widowed sister Margaret.

It is believed that Elizabeth Hoffman Back died, either in late 1815, or early 1816. She was probably buried in an unmarked grave, in the nearby Elk Run Cemetery, where her son Aaron's in-laws would later be buried.

Shortly after Elizabeth died, her son Aaron and his wife Elizabeth (Margaret Elizabeth Luger Hammer Back), sold the 50 acres that Elizabeth had been living on (and where Aaron had first lived, when he arrived in Rockingham County), on August 20, 1816. That 1816 deed described how Aaron and his aunt (Margaret Hoffman Back) had bought that land, back on April 10, 1809. A copy of that deed is attached to this memorial.

Aaron, his wife, and their infant son, then left Rockingham County and migrated to Ohio. Elizabeth's sister Margaret continued to live on her 50 acres along Wolf Run, until she died, around 1831.

All of this information can be easily verified, and you are encouraged to do so.


Family Members

Parents
Spouse
Siblings Half Siblings
Children

See more Back or Hoffman memorials in:

Flower Delivery