Whitey Ford

Whitey Ford

Original Name Edward Charles Ford
Birth
Manhattan, New York County (Manhattan), New York, USA
Death 8 Oct 2020 (aged 91)
Lake Success, Nassau County, New York, USA
Burial Locust Valley, Nassau County, New York, USA
Plot Double grave 14, 5th addition, Ketcham section, phase 4
Memorial ID 216682781 · View Source
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Major League Baseball Pitcher. He was a pitcher and was signed by the New York Yankees as an amateur free agent in 1947. He began his Major League Baseball (MLB) career on July 1, 1950, with the Yankees. He won his first nine decisions before losing a game in relief. He won the Sporting News Rookie of the Year Award. During the Korean War era, in 1951 and 1952, Ford served in the US Army. He rejoined the Yankees for the 1953 season, and their "Big Three" pitching staff became the "Big Four" as Ford joined Allie Reynolds, Vic Raschi, and Eddie Lopat. He wore number 19 in his rookie season, but when he returned, he changed to number 16, which he wore for the remainder of his career. He was often called "Chairman of the Board" for his ability to remain calm and in command during high-pressure situations. At the time, he tied the American League (AL) record for six consecutive strikeouts in 1956, and again in 1958. While never throwing a no-hitter, he did pitch two consecutive one-hit games in 1955 to tie a record held by several pitchers. Once Ralph Houk became manager of the Yankees in 1961, Ford got to play more often which helped his numbers. 1961 was his first 20-win season, a career best 25-4 record, and he won the Cy Young and Most Valuable Player Awards. He was a left-hander with a known pick-off move making him good at keeping runners on their base. He set a record in 1961 by pitching 243 consecutive innings without allowing a stolen base. In August 1966, he underwent surgery to correct a circulatory problem in his throwing shoulder. In May 1967, Ford lasted just one inning in what would be his final start. He announced his retirement at the end of the month at age 38. He won 236 games for the New York Yankees (career 236–106), still a franchise record and he is tied with Dave Foutz for the fourth-best winning percentage in baseball history at .690. His 2.75 earned run average is the third-lowest among starting pitchers whose careers began after the advent of the live-ball era in 1920. During his MLB career, he had 10 World Series victories, more than any other pitcher. Ford also leads all starters in World Series losses (8) and starts (22), as well as innings, hits, walks, and strikeouts. In 1974, Ford and Mickey Mantle were both elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame and at that time, the Yankees retired his number 16. In 1987, the Yankees dedicated plaques for Monument Park at Yankee Stadium for Ford and Lefty Gomez. In 1999, Ford ranked 52nd on The Sporting News List of Baseball's Greatest Players and was nominated for the Major League Baseball All-Century Team. He was a ten-time All-Star and six-time World Series champion. He led the AL in wins three times and in earned run average (ERA) twice. He is the Yankees franchise leader in career wins (236), shutouts (45), innings pitched (3,170 1⁄3), and games started by a pitcher (438; tied with Andy Pettitte). In 1977, he was part of the broadcast team for the first game in Toronto Blue Jays history. In 2008, Ford threw the first pitch at the 2008 Major League Baseball All-Star Game. In 2000, the ballfield overlooking the East River on 26th Avenue, between 1st and 2nd Streets in Astoria, Queens, was named Whitey Ford Field at a Yankee Stadium ceremony. When he died, he was the second-oldest living member of the Hall of Fame, after Tommy Lasorda.

Bio by: Glendora


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  • Maintained by: Find a Grave
  • Originally Created by: An Irish Blessing
  • Added: 11 Oct 2020
  • Find a Grave Memorial 216682781
  • Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed ), memorial page for Whitey Ford (21 Oct 1928–8 Oct 2020), Find a Grave Memorial no. 216682781, citing Locust Valley Cemetery, Locust Valley, Nassau County, New York, USA ; Maintained by Find A Grave .