Lou Brock

Lou Brock

Original Name Louis Clark Brock
Birth
El Dorado, Union County, Arkansas, USA
Death 6 Sep 2020 (aged 81)
St. Louis City, Missouri, USA
Burial Creve Coeur, St. Louis County, Missouri, USA
Memorial ID 215304898 · View Source
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Professional Baseball Player. He started in the Major Baseball League (MLB) with the Chicago Cubs but his career took off after he was traded to the St. Louis Cardinals on June 15, 1964. He became St. Louis' left fielder and hit .348 with 12 homers, 44 RBIs and 33 steals in 103 games. The Cardinals won the World Series in seven games against the New York Yankees in 1964. He led the team back to the World Series in 1967 and 1968. He had 12 hits in 1967, when St. Louis beat the Boston Red Sox in seven games, and had 13 hits a year later, when the Detroit Tigers took the title. Those two years were part of a 12-season stretch starting in 1965 in which Brock averaged 65 steals and 99 runs scored, with a batting average above .300 in six of those years. He hit 21 homers and stole 52 bases in 1967, making him the first player to hit more than 20 homers with at least 50 steals in a season. In 1974, he surpassed Maury Wills' single-season mark with 118 stolen bases, and he eclipsed Ty Cobb for the career mark in 1977, finishing with 938. He ended his 19-year career with 3,023 hits, 149 homers, 900 RBIs and a .293 average. He was so synonymous with base-stealing that in 1978 he became the first major leaguer to have an award named for him while still active: the Lou Brock Award, for the National League's leader in steals. For Brock, base-stealing was an art form and a kind of warfare. He was among the first players to study films of opposing pitchers and, once on base, relied on skill and psychology. In his 1976 memoir, "Lou Brock: Stealing is My Game," he explained his success. Take a "modest lead" and "stand perfectly still." He closed out his career in 1979 by batting .304, making his sixth All-Star Game appearance and winning the Comeback Player of the Year award. The Cardinals retired his uniform number, 20, and he was inducted into the Hall of Fame in his first year of eligibility in 1985.

Bio by: Glendora


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  • Maintained by: Find a Grave
  • Originally Created by: Zachary Finne
  • Added: 6 Sep 2020
  • Find a Grave Memorial 215304898
  • Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed ), memorial page for Lou Brock (18 Jun 1939–6 Sep 2020), Find a Grave Memorial no. 215304898, citing Bellerive Heritage Gardens, Creve Coeur, St. Louis County, Missouri, USA ; Maintained by Find A Grave .