Advertisement

 Andrew James Bishir

Advertisement

Andrew James Bishir

Birth
Death
1911 (aged 82–83)
Burial
Lynchburg, Highland County, Ohio, USA
Memorial ID
21504246 View Source

Andrew learned the cooper trade from his father and operated a shop on his farm. He was foreman of the Workum Distillery in Lynchburg, Ohio for 18 years. He served as a Sgt. in Company G, 192nd Ohio volunteer infantry during the Civil War.

------------

Andrew Bishir, retired farmer of Dodson township, is not only a descendant of old settlers but
may be regarded as one himself, his birth having occurred at an early period in the history of
Highland county. When his grandfather, Christopher Bishir, after tariying a while in 1810 at the
mouth of Crawfish river, came to Union township there were comparatively few people there to
greet him. In fact, the township had only been organized a year or two when this Pennsylvania
pioneer arrived with his wife and children. Even in 1833, when he built his log cabin in Dodson
township about one mile south of Lynchburg, the country was still wild and sparsely settled.
Aside from the dangers of Indian hostility, which had happily passed, the main features and
characteristics of a wilderness were all still present . Neighbors were few and far between, few
of the comforts of civilization were to be had and the wolves, still plentiful in the woods, made
night hideous with their dismal howlings. Deer, turkey, panthers, bear and other wild game
were yet abundant and the main reliance of the settlers for fresh meat. The pioneer alluded to
had a son named after himself, Christopher Bishir, who was born in Pennsylvania in 1805, and
after he grew to maturity in Ohio was married to Susan Hart, a native of North Carolina. This
couple passed away, the mother in 1839 and the father December 24, 1883, after rearing seven
children, of whom two sons and two daughters are living. One of the former is Andrew Bishir,
the honored subject of this sketch, who was born in Union township, Highland county, Ohio,
January 10, 1828. A few years after his birth he was taken by his parents to their new home in
Dodson township, where he grew to manhood, and October 23, 1850, was married to Piety
Ann Turner. This lady was a daughter of Calvin and Matilda (Wilson) Turner, Virginians who
came to Ohio in 1830, and she was born March 5, 1832, during their residence in Preble
county. Her parents went to Indiana in 1840, but after remaining there four years returned to
Ohio, where they both died, the father in 1872 at Martinsville, when sixty-two years old, and the
mother in 1893 at Farmers Station, in the eighty-fifth year of her age. The grandparents of Mrs.
Bishir, Meador and Catherine Turner, the former born in Virginia in 1783 and the latter in 1789,
also migrated to Ohio in 1830 and both died in Clinton county, he in 1853 and she in 1872.
Andrew Bishir, though reared on a farm, learned the cooper's trade and did considerable work
in that line, which was also the calling of his father. He obtained the position of foreman in the
distillery warehouse at Lynchburg and retained the same for eighteen years. May 2, 1864, Mr.
Bishir enlisted in one of the Ohio regiments organized for the hundred days' service and was
out with that command four months. February 10, 1865, he enlisted in Company G, One
Hundred and Ninetysecond regiment Ohio volunteer infantry, under Capt. Joseph Gayman, and
went with this organization to the lower Shenandoah valley in March. Their service was
confined to doing guard and garrison duty at Halltown and other places in that portion of
Virginia until September 6, 1865, when they were paid and discharged at Columbus, Ohio, Mr.
Bishir at the time holding the rank of sergeant. Mr. and Mrs. Bishir have had seven children, of
whom Isadora and Lizzie are dead, the living being Alonzo D., James W., Emma C., Mollie and
Arthur A. They celebrated their golden wedding October 23, 1900, and the occasion was a
memorable one for the large family connection, as well as the many friends of this venerable
and highly esteemed couple. All the children were present except James, accompanied by
their wives and offspring, the only notable absence being the wife of Arthur A., who was kept
away by sickness. Besides these, Samuel Turner, of Sabina, a brother of Mrs. Bishir, was
present, also her two sisters, Mary Dimmitt, of Marion, and Jennie Moon of Clinton county, and
Mr. Bishir's two sisters, Mrs. Elizabeth Fenner of Marshaltown, Iowa, and Sarah Walker of
Vienna, Ohio. Originally a Democrat, Mr. Bishir was converted to Republicanism by the
agitation of the questions growing out of the civil war. He and wife are members of the Christian
church and are passing the evening of their days in the quiet and retired life which fittingly ends
so many years of activity.

More information about Andrew James Bishir is here

Andrew learned the cooper trade from his father and operated a shop on his farm. He was foreman of the Workum Distillery in Lynchburg, Ohio for 18 years. He served as a Sgt. in Company G, 192nd Ohio volunteer infantry during the Civil War.

------------

Andrew Bishir, retired farmer of Dodson township, is not only a descendant of old settlers but
may be regarded as one himself, his birth having occurred at an early period in the history of
Highland county. When his grandfather, Christopher Bishir, after tariying a while in 1810 at the
mouth of Crawfish river, came to Union township there were comparatively few people there to
greet him. In fact, the township had only been organized a year or two when this Pennsylvania
pioneer arrived with his wife and children. Even in 1833, when he built his log cabin in Dodson
township about one mile south of Lynchburg, the country was still wild and sparsely settled.
Aside from the dangers of Indian hostility, which had happily passed, the main features and
characteristics of a wilderness were all still present . Neighbors were few and far between, few
of the comforts of civilization were to be had and the wolves, still plentiful in the woods, made
night hideous with their dismal howlings. Deer, turkey, panthers, bear and other wild game
were yet abundant and the main reliance of the settlers for fresh meat. The pioneer alluded to
had a son named after himself, Christopher Bishir, who was born in Pennsylvania in 1805, and
after he grew to maturity in Ohio was married to Susan Hart, a native of North Carolina. This
couple passed away, the mother in 1839 and the father December 24, 1883, after rearing seven
children, of whom two sons and two daughters are living. One of the former is Andrew Bishir,
the honored subject of this sketch, who was born in Union township, Highland county, Ohio,
January 10, 1828. A few years after his birth he was taken by his parents to their new home in
Dodson township, where he grew to manhood, and October 23, 1850, was married to Piety
Ann Turner. This lady was a daughter of Calvin and Matilda (Wilson) Turner, Virginians who
came to Ohio in 1830, and she was born March 5, 1832, during their residence in Preble
county. Her parents went to Indiana in 1840, but after remaining there four years returned to
Ohio, where they both died, the father in 1872 at Martinsville, when sixty-two years old, and the
mother in 1893 at Farmers Station, in the eighty-fifth year of her age. The grandparents of Mrs.
Bishir, Meador and Catherine Turner, the former born in Virginia in 1783 and the latter in 1789,
also migrated to Ohio in 1830 and both died in Clinton county, he in 1853 and she in 1872.
Andrew Bishir, though reared on a farm, learned the cooper's trade and did considerable work
in that line, which was also the calling of his father. He obtained the position of foreman in the
distillery warehouse at Lynchburg and retained the same for eighteen years. May 2, 1864, Mr.
Bishir enlisted in one of the Ohio regiments organized for the hundred days' service and was
out with that command four months. February 10, 1865, he enlisted in Company G, One
Hundred and Ninetysecond regiment Ohio volunteer infantry, under Capt. Joseph Gayman, and
went with this organization to the lower Shenandoah valley in March. Their service was
confined to doing guard and garrison duty at Halltown and other places in that portion of
Virginia until September 6, 1865, when they were paid and discharged at Columbus, Ohio, Mr.
Bishir at the time holding the rank of sergeant. Mr. and Mrs. Bishir have had seven children, of
whom Isadora and Lizzie are dead, the living being Alonzo D., James W., Emma C., Mollie and
Arthur A. They celebrated their golden wedding October 23, 1900, and the occasion was a
memorable one for the large family connection, as well as the many friends of this venerable
and highly esteemed couple. All the children were present except James, accompanied by
their wives and offspring, the only notable absence being the wife of Arthur A., who was kept
away by sickness. Besides these, Samuel Turner, of Sabina, a brother of Mrs. Bishir, was
present, also her two sisters, Mary Dimmitt, of Marion, and Jennie Moon of Clinton county, and
Mr. Bishir's two sisters, Mrs. Elizabeth Fenner of Marshaltown, Iowa, and Sarah Walker of
Vienna, Ohio. Originally a Democrat, Mr. Bishir was converted to Republicanism by the
agitation of the questions growing out of the civil war. He and wife are members of the Christian
church and are passing the evening of their days in the quiet and retired life which fittingly ends
so many years of activity.

More information about Andrew James Bishir is here


Inscription

Civil War Marker

Gravesite Details

Old Masonic Cemetery (not F&AM)


Family Members

Parents
Spouse

Flowers

In their memory
Plant Memorial Trees

Sponsored by Ancestry

Advertisement