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 James Philander Pendill

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James Philander Pendill

Birth
Batavia, Genesee County, New York, USA
Death
9 Mar 1885 (aged 72)
Marquette, Marquette County, Michigan, USA
Burial
Marquette, Marquette County, Michigan, USA
Memorial ID
21185279 View Source

Marquette [MI] Mining Journal, March 10, 1885

Monday afternoon, March 9, 1885, about two o'clock. Mr. J.P. Pendill, while back of his store, in some manner overstrained himself in lifting. Shortly after he entered his house and complained of severe pains in the chest and abdomen. Dr. Thiell was summoned, but he did not think there was anything serious the matter, and, after giving him an opiate to allay the pain, left. Immediately after, the pains increased in severity and spread over all the body, and he died a few minutes after. His son, James Pendill, Jr., had summoned Dr. Northrup, but before the physician arrived Mr. Pendill had passed away from earth. He was aged seventy-three years. Mr. Pendill was born in New York state, near Batavia. He came to Michigan in 1845 and located at Sault Ste. Marie, from which place he moved to Marquette ten years later, and to Negaunee in 1867, living there seven years, after which he located in Marquette, where he has resided ever since. In 1872 he was elected mayor of Negaunee, and re-elected in 1873. In 1879 he was elected mayor of Marquette and filled the office for three successive terms. In the administration of public affairs Mr. Pendill displayed the same life and activity that characterized the conduct of his own business. He was the first mayor of Negaunee, and during his incumbency instituted reforms and improvements that will long remain. While mayor of this city, his administration was energetic and progressive, and will be long remembered by the citizens. Personally, Mr. Pendill was scrupulously honest, and although blunt in his manner at times, he was generous and charitable, and was extremely popular in this community.[p.61] He was quite wealthy at the time of his death, and most of his property is located here and in Negaunee. During his residence in the two cities he did a general merchandise business, and accumulated his wealth by strict integrity and attention to business. He leaves a wife, three sons and a daughter, all of whom have the sincere sympathy of a wide circle of friends.

Marquette [MI] Mining Journal, March 11, 1885.

The shock caused by the unexpected and sudden death of Hon. James P. Pendill, on Monday afternoon, to us, and in fact this whole community, was so great that in the hastily written obituary notice given Tuesday morning, we did not as fully cover the subject as we desired, or as his worth merited. Yesterday we interviewed several of the older citizens as to Mr. Pendill's life, and there was but one expression, that of intense sorrow and regret, at his sudden "taking off." Said one: "I first made Mr. Pendill's acquaintance in the summer of 1849. He was then keeping a large store opposite the Van Auden House at Sault Ste. Marie, and was doing a good business. In the early spring of 1855 he sent the late J. W. Watson to this place with a stock of goods, to open a store, and later in the year he came himself, accompanied by his wife, to settle and live in Marquette, he having closed his business at the Sault. He expressed great faith in the future of Marquette, and of the whole iron region. His first place of business here was on the north side of Superior street, near the corner of Third, but after a few months spent in that location, he purchased the dwelling where his family now reside, on the south side of the same street, and erected a store just east of it, where he continued to do business to the hour of his death. In the spring of 1856, and for several years subsequently, he was elected supervisor of the then township of Marquette, and for many years he was chairman of the board of supervisors. As supervisor he rendered intelligent and valuable services, and would never consent to receive any compensation therefor. Later on, he served in the State Legislature as a member from this representative district, with honor and credit to himself, as well as to the advantage of his constituents. He procured an amendment to the mining law, by which one-half of all specific taxes paid into the State treasury by mining companies of the upper peninsula should be paid back to the counties from which they should be derived, and we are still enjoying the benefits of that wise and just legislation. He has many times held the position of school trustee, and always took great interest in all that tended to advance and improve our common schools. but it was as mayor of this city[p.62] for several successive terms that he rendered valuable and never-to-be-forgotten services. Touching on this point, Mr. Peter White said to the reporter: "If I were to recapitulate to you all the work and achievements of his mayoralty, it would fill two pages or more of your paper! I could recite to you anecdotes, peculiarities, eccentricities and good deeds that would fill a good-sized volume and be quite interesting, but I forbear for the moment. "He was always a kind and generous friend of the poor. He has ever been proud of the city or town where his home was, whether it was Negaunee or Marquette, and if the public would not make good roads and streets he would have them made at his own expense. In this connection I must relate a characteristic anecdote: It was several years ago, he was mayor of the city, and in spite of his opposition, a certain member of the council had by hook or by crook, log-rolled a scheme through that body by which the sum of $100 was appropriated to be expended under direction of said councilman to repair a certain bad piece of road about a mile from the center of the city. Early next morning the mayor and his son and two of his men, with his span of horses and wagon and tools, could have been seen wending their way to the aforesaid ‘certain bad road.' and in less than half a day it was repaired, and well done, too, andwithout taking a cent out of the city treasury. "Mr. Pendill was born in Batavia, in western New York, and moved to Michigan almost fifty years ago. He first settled in Niles, but did business in Michigan City, Ind., as well as Niles. Chauncey Blair, who in those days lived in that part of Michigan, but is now a wealthy banker in Chicago, has told me that he ‘knew Jim Pendill in Niles in 1837, and a right lively boy he was, too.’ He had often seen him driving his ‘four-in-hand.' with broadcloth suit on and in snow-white gloves, but he added: ‘Jim always paid his debts, and was a good citizen.' He has always been a man of sterling integrity, truthful and reliable in all his statements, vigorous in denouncing wrong, and ever willing to laud and praise a good act. I have never heard him accused of being two-faced or double. To speak words of praise of him in this community, where everybody knew him so well, seems a work of supererogation, and reminds me of the sermon preached by the great Dr. Muhlenburg over the remains of that splendid philanthropist, Robert B. Minturn, of New York City. The preacher ascended the pulpit, and standing before the vast audience assembled to pay the last token of respect to the departed, in solemn, measured tones, and in a vividly impressive manner, never to be forgotten by those present, said: ‘A good man hath gone to his[p.63] rest; let us pray.' I had almost forgotten to mention that Mr. Pendill was the first mayor of Negaunee, and in that capacity rendered that city services that were handsomely appreciated by its people. "‘A good man hath gone to his rest.' All honor to his memory."

Sault Ste Marie [MI] Evening News July 26, 1951 p. 5

Sale of property around Pendill's Creek in Chippewa County to the Federal government for use as a fish hatchery site was disclosed last week by Olive Pendill , 320 East Ridge Street in Marquette.
The property, named for her father, James P. Pendill, extends about a half a mile along the shoreline of Pendill's Bay and averages about a quarter of a mile in depth. It covers around 85 acres and is located some 20 miles west of Sault Ste. Marie. The creek empties into the bay at a point near the middle of the property.
Pendill's Creek is small, but its water conditions are excellent for hatchery purposes. The hatchery will be constructed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and will be devoted primarily to rearing of Lake Superior species, such as lake trout and whitefish. Preliminary operations already are underway.
Pendill, a native of Connecticut*, came to the Sault from Niles Mich. in 1845. He operated a business at the Sault and in 1852 purchased from the government a large portion of land on Whitefish Bay near the mouth of the Tahquamenon River. There he set up a sawmill and a general store. He continued to reside in the Sault, however. Part of the land purchased by Pendill now forms a portion of the Marquette National Forest.
In October, 1855, Pendill came to Marquette and opened the Tremont House, a three story hotel located on Baraga Avenue west of the railroad crossing. It was one of the first hotels to be built in Marquette and one of the leading region prior to 1870. The structure later was used for several years as a railway station.
Pendill served as mayor of Marquette from 1878 to 1881.

*Batavia, New York

Marquette [MI] Mining Journal, March 10, 1885

Monday afternoon, March 9, 1885, about two o'clock. Mr. J.P. Pendill, while back of his store, in some manner overstrained himself in lifting. Shortly after he entered his house and complained of severe pains in the chest and abdomen. Dr. Thiell was summoned, but he did not think there was anything serious the matter, and, after giving him an opiate to allay the pain, left. Immediately after, the pains increased in severity and spread over all the body, and he died a few minutes after. His son, James Pendill, Jr., had summoned Dr. Northrup, but before the physician arrived Mr. Pendill had passed away from earth. He was aged seventy-three years. Mr. Pendill was born in New York state, near Batavia. He came to Michigan in 1845 and located at Sault Ste. Marie, from which place he moved to Marquette ten years later, and to Negaunee in 1867, living there seven years, after which he located in Marquette, where he has resided ever since. In 1872 he was elected mayor of Negaunee, and re-elected in 1873. In 1879 he was elected mayor of Marquette and filled the office for three successive terms. In the administration of public affairs Mr. Pendill displayed the same life and activity that characterized the conduct of his own business. He was the first mayor of Negaunee, and during his incumbency instituted reforms and improvements that will long remain. While mayor of this city, his administration was energetic and progressive, and will be long remembered by the citizens. Personally, Mr. Pendill was scrupulously honest, and although blunt in his manner at times, he was generous and charitable, and was extremely popular in this community.[p.61] He was quite wealthy at the time of his death, and most of his property is located here and in Negaunee. During his residence in the two cities he did a general merchandise business, and accumulated his wealth by strict integrity and attention to business. He leaves a wife, three sons and a daughter, all of whom have the sincere sympathy of a wide circle of friends.

Marquette [MI] Mining Journal, March 11, 1885.

The shock caused by the unexpected and sudden death of Hon. James P. Pendill, on Monday afternoon, to us, and in fact this whole community, was so great that in the hastily written obituary notice given Tuesday morning, we did not as fully cover the subject as we desired, or as his worth merited. Yesterday we interviewed several of the older citizens as to Mr. Pendill's life, and there was but one expression, that of intense sorrow and regret, at his sudden "taking off." Said one: "I first made Mr. Pendill's acquaintance in the summer of 1849. He was then keeping a large store opposite the Van Auden House at Sault Ste. Marie, and was doing a good business. In the early spring of 1855 he sent the late J. W. Watson to this place with a stock of goods, to open a store, and later in the year he came himself, accompanied by his wife, to settle and live in Marquette, he having closed his business at the Sault. He expressed great faith in the future of Marquette, and of the whole iron region. His first place of business here was on the north side of Superior street, near the corner of Third, but after a few months spent in that location, he purchased the dwelling where his family now reside, on the south side of the same street, and erected a store just east of it, where he continued to do business to the hour of his death. In the spring of 1856, and for several years subsequently, he was elected supervisor of the then township of Marquette, and for many years he was chairman of the board of supervisors. As supervisor he rendered intelligent and valuable services, and would never consent to receive any compensation therefor. Later on, he served in the State Legislature as a member from this representative district, with honor and credit to himself, as well as to the advantage of his constituents. He procured an amendment to the mining law, by which one-half of all specific taxes paid into the State treasury by mining companies of the upper peninsula should be paid back to the counties from which they should be derived, and we are still enjoying the benefits of that wise and just legislation. He has many times held the position of school trustee, and always took great interest in all that tended to advance and improve our common schools. but it was as mayor of this city[p.62] for several successive terms that he rendered valuable and never-to-be-forgotten services. Touching on this point, Mr. Peter White said to the reporter: "If I were to recapitulate to you all the work and achievements of his mayoralty, it would fill two pages or more of your paper! I could recite to you anecdotes, peculiarities, eccentricities and good deeds that would fill a good-sized volume and be quite interesting, but I forbear for the moment. "He was always a kind and generous friend of the poor. He has ever been proud of the city or town where his home was, whether it was Negaunee or Marquette, and if the public would not make good roads and streets he would have them made at his own expense. In this connection I must relate a characteristic anecdote: It was several years ago, he was mayor of the city, and in spite of his opposition, a certain member of the council had by hook or by crook, log-rolled a scheme through that body by which the sum of $100 was appropriated to be expended under direction of said councilman to repair a certain bad piece of road about a mile from the center of the city. Early next morning the mayor and his son and two of his men, with his span of horses and wagon and tools, could have been seen wending their way to the aforesaid ‘certain bad road.' and in less than half a day it was repaired, and well done, too, andwithout taking a cent out of the city treasury. "Mr. Pendill was born in Batavia, in western New York, and moved to Michigan almost fifty years ago. He first settled in Niles, but did business in Michigan City, Ind., as well as Niles. Chauncey Blair, who in those days lived in that part of Michigan, but is now a wealthy banker in Chicago, has told me that he ‘knew Jim Pendill in Niles in 1837, and a right lively boy he was, too.’ He had often seen him driving his ‘four-in-hand.' with broadcloth suit on and in snow-white gloves, but he added: ‘Jim always paid his debts, and was a good citizen.' He has always been a man of sterling integrity, truthful and reliable in all his statements, vigorous in denouncing wrong, and ever willing to laud and praise a good act. I have never heard him accused of being two-faced or double. To speak words of praise of him in this community, where everybody knew him so well, seems a work of supererogation, and reminds me of the sermon preached by the great Dr. Muhlenburg over the remains of that splendid philanthropist, Robert B. Minturn, of New York City. The preacher ascended the pulpit, and standing before the vast audience assembled to pay the last token of respect to the departed, in solemn, measured tones, and in a vividly impressive manner, never to be forgotten by those present, said: ‘A good man hath gone to his[p.63] rest; let us pray.' I had almost forgotten to mention that Mr. Pendill was the first mayor of Negaunee, and in that capacity rendered that city services that were handsomely appreciated by its people. "‘A good man hath gone to his rest.' All honor to his memory."

Sault Ste Marie [MI] Evening News July 26, 1951 p. 5

Sale of property around Pendill's Creek in Chippewa County to the Federal government for use as a fish hatchery site was disclosed last week by Olive Pendill , 320 East Ridge Street in Marquette.
The property, named for her father, James P. Pendill, extends about a half a mile along the shoreline of Pendill's Bay and averages about a quarter of a mile in depth. It covers around 85 acres and is located some 20 miles west of Sault Ste. Marie. The creek empties into the bay at a point near the middle of the property.
Pendill's Creek is small, but its water conditions are excellent for hatchery purposes. The hatchery will be constructed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and will be devoted primarily to rearing of Lake Superior species, such as lake trout and whitefish. Preliminary operations already are underway.
Pendill, a native of Connecticut*, came to the Sault from Niles Mich. in 1845. He operated a business at the Sault and in 1852 purchased from the government a large portion of land on Whitefish Bay near the mouth of the Tahquamenon River. There he set up a sawmill and a general store. He continued to reside in the Sault, however. Part of the land purchased by Pendill now forms a portion of the Marquette National Forest.
In October, 1855, Pendill came to Marquette and opened the Tremont House, a three story hotel located on Baraga Avenue west of the railroad crossing. It was one of the first hotels to be built in Marquette and one of the leading region prior to 1870. The structure later was used for several years as a railway station.
Pendill served as mayor of Marquette from 1878 to 1881.

*Batavia, New York


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