Eddie Sutton

Eddie Sutton

Original Name Edward Eugene
Birth
Bucklin, Ford County, Kansas, USA
Death 23 May 2020 (aged 84)
Tulsa, Tulsa County, Oklahoma, USA
Burial Tulsa, Tulsa County, Oklahoma, USA
Plot Sec 11- Plot 256 - Sp 4
Memorial ID 210409607 · View Source
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American Basketball Coach. During his lengthy career of 36 years, Eddie Sutton was the coach of several Division I NCAA men's basketball programs including Creighton, Arkansas, the University of Kentucky, Oklahoma State, and the University of San Francisco. Over three decades, he became the first coach to lead four different schools to the NCAA championship tournament, as well as becoming one of eight coaches to attain over 800 career wins. Sutton's entrance into major division basketball came in 1969 when he left his position as the coach of the College of Southern Idaho to take the helm of the Creighton Bluejays. Five years later Creighton received a bid to the NCAA tournament, a first in Sutton's career. Following the schools narrow defeat to Kansas in the regional tournament, Sutton departed Nebraska to assume control of the University of Arkansas Razorbacks. For the next eleven years, he energized a once lackluster program, securing five Southwest Conference championships, nine NCAA tournaments bids, as well as an impressive performance during the 1978 season which saw the Razorbacks make it to the Final Four before losing to the University of Kentucky Wildcats. Sutton's career took another turn in 1985 when he replaced UK's Joe B. Hall, the very man who had ended his tournament run only seven years before. Sutton's tenure in Kentucky started with much promise with an Elite Eight appearance in 1986 as well as a Southeastern Conference championship two years later. However, the following year that promising career was derailed due to a major NCAA investigation into UK's athletics department. Presiding over a program accused of numerous policy violations, Sutton was forced to resign from what many consider to be one of the most prestigious coaching positions in the NCAA. With a career tarnished by the allegations stemming from his time at UK, Sutton quickly set out to restore his reputation in the game by taking the head coaching position at his own alma mater, Oklahoma State University. Over the next seventeen years, he revitalized the program, leading the Cowboy's to thirteen NCAA tournament appearances, two Final Fours, and three Big Eight Conference championships. With an impressive 368 career wins at Oklahoma State, Sutton stands at second in coaching victories at the school. In recognition of his accomplishments, the basketball court at Oklahoma State was renamed in coach Sutton's honor in 2005. His final coaching position came in 2007 when he was named as the University of San Francisco interim head coach. The following year he secured his 800th career victory, an accomplishment which placed him among other legendary coaching figures such as Adolph Rupp, Mike Krzyzewski, and Bob Knight. Only a few weeks before his passing, coach Sutton was elected to the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame, a final honor which enshrined his name with countless other legends in the sport which he devoted his life to.

Bio by: Kentucky Hill Hunter


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  • Maintained by: Find a Grave
  • Originally Created by: Kentucky Hill Hunter
  • Added: 24 May 2020
  • Find a Grave Memorial 210409607
  • Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed ), memorial page for Eddie Sutton (12 Mar 1936–23 May 2020), Find a Grave Memorial no. 210409607, citing Calvary Cemetery, Tulsa, Tulsa County, Oklahoma, USA ; Maintained by Find A Grave .