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Frank Little Hughes

Birth
California, USA
Death
6 Jul 1907 (aged 49–50)
Nevada County, California, USA
Burial
Grass Valley, Nevada County, California, USA Add to Map
Memorial ID
View Source
The Morning Union Grass Valley, California Tuesday July 16, 1907 Page 8
FOUND HUGHES’ BODY IN CREEK
He had Been Dead for Nine Days and Lay in the Bottom of Pool.
Brought From Deer Creek and Laid at Rest in the I.O.O.F. Cemetery.
A nine days’ mystery was cleared up Sunday morning when the body of Frank Hughes was found floating in a pool in Deer Creek, opposite the home of Michael Kendrick. Beyond a doubt the body had lain at the bottom of the hole since a week ago Saturday.
The discovery was made by Kendrick about 11 o’clock in the morning on going down to the creek. Word was immediately sent to the authorities and the brother of the dead man, James Hughes himself hurried to this city and told of the gruesome find. Undertaker Thomas Harris, accompanied by Coroner Gill, soon after drove to the scene, returning with the remains during the middle of the afternoon. The body was badly decomposed and the undertaker took it to the receiving vault at Greenwood cemetery to await burial. It gave evidence that the unfortunate man had suffered greatly and had sustained painful injuries during his delirious ramblings. His hands were badly cut and the fingers worn and the flesh in pieces hanging in shreds. A large lump was discerned behind one ear and his shirt was torn to ribbons, mute evidence of his terrible struggle through the heavy brush. It is probable that he fell at the edge of the pool, sustaining the bruise at the back of the head, was rendered unconscious and rolled into the water, only to sink to the bottom, there to remain until the proverbial nine days, when a body comes to the surface.
Hughes was undoubtedly the man whom a Mrs. Waite saw on the morning of the 6th staggering along the banks of the creek in an aimless manner, waving his hands in the air. She observed him through a field glass and reported the matter, but despite the fact that his brother, James, William Deeble and others went up and down the creek after the news reached them, not the slightest trace of the missing man was found. All this points to the fact that he staggered along in the throes of temporary insanity until he took the fatal plunge into the hole near the Kendrick place.
At that point Kendrick has constructed a small temporary dam across the stream in order to obtain water for irrigating purposes, he having quite a truck garden on the flat near by. The water is only four or five feet deep, and under ordinary circumstances a man could easily clamber out even if unable to swim. It seems to have been the belief of residents in that section that the body was in the hole, and after Mrs. Waite told her story, as a lad named Brown waded through the pool several times the latter part of the week for the express purpose of ascertaining whether or not Hughes’ body was hidden in the darkened depths. It is possible that he missed the body by an inch or two, as it would have been impossible for it to have floated down to the dam, since in places there are only a few inches of water in the stream. Besides, its bed was closely patrolled days before.
Decedent was born on the Hughes ranch, on the old Nevada road, and had he lived until September 25th would have been fifty years of age. The Hughes place in the fifties and early sixties was a great gathering place for the fun-loving. It was a combination hotel and wayside place, and at one time the grounds were covered with fruit trees and grapevines. Old timers recall the many good times which took place there in the shape of parties, dances and horse races. The Hughes family was widely known and held in high esteem. Frank Hughes himself owned considerable property on Hills Flat, left by his parents, and, though his weakness finally led him to a sad end, he had not an enemy in the world. Men pitied the poor fellow and his friends offered good advice time and again. He had no enemy but himself. He leaves two brothers, James C. of this place, Charles of San Francisco, and Mrs. John Davis, also of San Francisco. The funeral took place last evening, Rev. C. M. Hitchcock officiating. The remains were interred in the Odd Fellows’ cemetery.
Coroner Gill and a jury held an inquest last night after the funeral. A verdict of accidental death from drowning was returned.
The Morning Union Grass Valley, California Tuesday July 16, 1907 Page 8
FOUND HUGHES’ BODY IN CREEK
He had Been Dead for Nine Days and Lay in the Bottom of Pool.
Brought From Deer Creek and Laid at Rest in the I.O.O.F. Cemetery.
A nine days’ mystery was cleared up Sunday morning when the body of Frank Hughes was found floating in a pool in Deer Creek, opposite the home of Michael Kendrick. Beyond a doubt the body had lain at the bottom of the hole since a week ago Saturday.
The discovery was made by Kendrick about 11 o’clock in the morning on going down to the creek. Word was immediately sent to the authorities and the brother of the dead man, James Hughes himself hurried to this city and told of the gruesome find. Undertaker Thomas Harris, accompanied by Coroner Gill, soon after drove to the scene, returning with the remains during the middle of the afternoon. The body was badly decomposed and the undertaker took it to the receiving vault at Greenwood cemetery to await burial. It gave evidence that the unfortunate man had suffered greatly and had sustained painful injuries during his delirious ramblings. His hands were badly cut and the fingers worn and the flesh in pieces hanging in shreds. A large lump was discerned behind one ear and his shirt was torn to ribbons, mute evidence of his terrible struggle through the heavy brush. It is probable that he fell at the edge of the pool, sustaining the bruise at the back of the head, was rendered unconscious and rolled into the water, only to sink to the bottom, there to remain until the proverbial nine days, when a body comes to the surface.
Hughes was undoubtedly the man whom a Mrs. Waite saw on the morning of the 6th staggering along the banks of the creek in an aimless manner, waving his hands in the air. She observed him through a field glass and reported the matter, but despite the fact that his brother, James, William Deeble and others went up and down the creek after the news reached them, not the slightest trace of the missing man was found. All this points to the fact that he staggered along in the throes of temporary insanity until he took the fatal plunge into the hole near the Kendrick place.
At that point Kendrick has constructed a small temporary dam across the stream in order to obtain water for irrigating purposes, he having quite a truck garden on the flat near by. The water is only four or five feet deep, and under ordinary circumstances a man could easily clamber out even if unable to swim. It seems to have been the belief of residents in that section that the body was in the hole, and after Mrs. Waite told her story, as a lad named Brown waded through the pool several times the latter part of the week for the express purpose of ascertaining whether or not Hughes’ body was hidden in the darkened depths. It is possible that he missed the body by an inch or two, as it would have been impossible for it to have floated down to the dam, since in places there are only a few inches of water in the stream. Besides, its bed was closely patrolled days before.
Decedent was born on the Hughes ranch, on the old Nevada road, and had he lived until September 25th would have been fifty years of age. The Hughes place in the fifties and early sixties was a great gathering place for the fun-loving. It was a combination hotel and wayside place, and at one time the grounds were covered with fruit trees and grapevines. Old timers recall the many good times which took place there in the shape of parties, dances and horse races. The Hughes family was widely known and held in high esteem. Frank Hughes himself owned considerable property on Hills Flat, left by his parents, and, though his weakness finally led him to a sad end, he had not an enemy in the world. Men pitied the poor fellow and his friends offered good advice time and again. He had no enemy but himself. He leaves two brothers, James C. of this place, Charles of San Francisco, and Mrs. John Davis, also of San Francisco. The funeral took place last evening, Rev. C. M. Hitchcock officiating. The remains were interred in the Odd Fellows’ cemetery.
Coroner Gill and a jury held an inquest last night after the funeral. A verdict of accidental death from drowning was returned.


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