Suggest Edits
 Francesco Canova da Milano

Photo added by Bobb Edwards

Francesco Canova da Milano

Lutenist, Composer. Arguably the greatest lute player of the Renaissance, he was called "Il divino" ("The Divine"). Francesco was born in Monza, near Milan. From 1519 he was based in Rome, where he was employed at the Papal Courts of Leo X, Clement VII, and Paul III, as well as by Cardinal Ippolito de' Medici. He maintained close ties with his native region and was appointed a Canon at Milan's Basilica dei SS Apostoli e Nazaro Maggiore, a position he later resigned to marry a wealthy Milanese noblewoman. He was buried at the Church of Santa Maria della Scala, which was demolished in 1776 to make way for the La Scala opera house. Francesco was one of the most famous musicians of his era. Popes and visiting royalty bowed before his talent and written accounts of his playing range from superlative to awestruck. His 124 known lute compositions, published in seven books between 1536 and 1548 and reprinted througout Europe, remain among the most dazzling works for that instrument. They include 60 freestyle ricercars, 40 fantasias, a toccata, and arrangements of contrapuntal vocal music. The latter reflected his knowledge of the French school (he adapted songs by Sermisy, Compere, and Mouton), though his style was thoroughly Italianate. A number of Francesco's pieces have been transcribed for modern guitar.

Bio by: Bobb Edwards


Advertisement

Advertisement

Advertisement

Advertisement

How famous was Francesco Canova da Milano?

Current rating:

20 votes

Sign-in to cast your vote.

  • Maintained by: Find A Grave
  • Originally Created by: Bobb Edwards
  • Added: 8 Aug 2007
  • Find A Grave Memorial 20842435
  • Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed ), memorial page for Francesco Canova da Milano (18 Aug 1497–2 Jan 1543), Find A Grave Memorial no. 20842435, citing Chiesa di Santa Maria della Scala (Defunct), Milan, Città Metropolitana di Milano, Lombardia, Italy ; Maintained by Find A Grave .