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BG Charles Carroll Walcutt

BG Charles Carroll Walcutt

Birth
Columbus, Franklin County, Ohio, USA
Death 2 May 1898 (aged 60)
Omaha, Douglas County, Nebraska, USA
Burial Columbus, Franklin County, Ohio, USA
Plot Section C, Lot 122
Memorial ID 20819 · View Source
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Civil War Union Brigadier General. He was born in Columbus, Ohio, the son of a veteran of the War of 1812 and the grandson of a soldier who served in the Revolution, he graduated in 1858 from the Kentucky Military Institute. He devoted himself to civilian pursuits, principally as a county surveyor in central Ohio, until April 1861, when he raised a company of Ohio volunteers, an ambition temporarily frustrated when the state, having filled its original enlistment quota, refused to accept his unit. For a time he had to be contented with the rank of Major of state troops, but on October 1, 1861, he entered Federal service as a field officer in the 46th Ohio Infantry. He was wounded in his first battle, Shiloh, where his regiment was ravaged by a Confederate brigade that assaulted the far Union right. Though a minie ball lodged in his left shoulder, he remained with his regiment, becoming its Colonel on October 16, 1862, and fighting skillfully throughout the Vicksburg Campaign. Late in 1863, at Missionary Ridge and during the relief of Knoxville, he commanded a brigade in the XV Corps, Army of the Tennessee. He rendered his most conspicuous service during the Atlanta Campaign and on Major General William T. Sherman's March to the Sea as a Brigadier General of Volunteers. He distinguished himself at Dallas, Georgia, on May 28, 1864, where his troops repulsed the charging brigade of Brigadier General Frank C. Armstrong on the Villa Rica road, killing or wounding almost 250 Confederate. Four months later, he led the Union forces in the only pitched battle on the road from Atlanta to the sea. At Griswoldville, on November 22, his brigade, guarding Sherman's rear, destroyed a larger force comprising Georgia militia and state troops. Among the few Federal casualties was himself, wounded in the leg. Recovered, he returned to his brigade in March 1865 and early the next month succeeded to the command of the 1st Division, XIV Corps. As a brevet Major General, he was mustered out of the volunteers on January 15, 1866, to become warden of the Ohio Penitentiary. He briefly returned to uniform as Lieutenant Colonel of the newly authorized black unit, the 10th United States Cavalry, but resigned later that same year. In 1869 President Ulysses S. Grant appointed him collector of internal revenue. Later a 2 term mayor of Columbus, Ohio, and active in Republican and veterans' circles, he died in Omaha, Nebraska.

Bio by: Ugaalltheway


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  • Maintained by: Find A Grave
  • Added: 11 Mar 2001
  • Find A Grave Memorial 20819
  • Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed ), memorial page for BG Charles Carroll Walcutt (12 Feb 1838–2 May 1898), Find A Grave Memorial no. 20819, citing Green Lawn Cemetery, Columbus, Franklin County, Ohio, USA ; Maintained by Find A Grave .